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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Reading DaveZ's back n forth with Sabatoa in Mi. Regional thread got me thinking. First time I set foot on a skate board 40 some odd years ago, I hit one of those pebbles Dave described and spent 2 weeks picking gravel out of my knees, elbows n chin! Haven't ridden one since!

My very first time snowboarding, On the last run of the night. I caught an edge n slammed HARD! I found out later that what I had was called a Hip Pointer injury. I was in such obvious pain, I had to repeatedly talk the ski patrol out of stretchering me off the hill. I wasn't entirely certain I would be able to drive once I finally reached my car.

Oddly enough, next week I was back for more! AND, even managed to repeat the Exact Same injury that night. (...this time I was wearing DIY hip pads. Good thing too, cuz if I hadn't been, I would have needed a stretcher!)

....but once again, by the next weekend, I was back out trying to get the basics of not falling down!

Im sure a few of us recall, near the end of last season. New members Jennifer and Beachlegogal, they kept posting about the "Brutal" beatings they were taking trying to learn how to snowboard! Still, they kept going back out! I know I've talked to others who took some really massive hits early on, but didn't give up. They kept going back until it "Clicked!"

With the season soon approaching, I thought it would be interesting to hear from other SBF members who like myself and I suspect a few others, kept coming back even after all the bruises and sprains of those first few outings and persevered despite the pain for the sake of "The Stoke!"

There are precious few things in my life that I would be willing to endure such pain trying and yet would continue to go back and try over and over again!!!

I know we will probably hear from a few "Gnartural Athletes" who "never had a lesson, just borrowed a bud's board and were hitting the Super Pipe by the end of the day! ;). but I really want to hear from those who kept asking themselves, "Why am I beating the Piss out of myself?" But kept coming back anyway! :)

How about it? Anyone! :thumbsup:
 

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I think I'm somewhere in the middle. I took a couple of good falls (think I might have cracked a rib on one of them) but mostly it was more embarrassing and irritating than crippling. Yeah, I've been sore at the end of the day (and the next day) but I've been doing various sports (and weight-lifting) all my life so that just seems normal.

The worst injuries I've had were last season. I got an abdominal pull trying to dig myself out on a deep deep pow day, and a tailbone injury from getting knocked over coming off the lift.
 

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I skied for years before I tried boarding in the early 2000's. I picked it up fairly quickly but I had my bruises along the way.

The one that remains a clear memory is the slam on the cat track. I was flat basing to keep up speed through a flat part - at this point I could barely link turns. I caught a front edge and violently slammed on a ice patch. I layed there for what seemed like an eternity just trying to catch my breath! I couldn't sleep or put a Tshirt on by myself for weeks. I was broke back then and did not have insurance so I never went in, pretty sure I atleast cracked my ribs. Maybe a slight concussion too.

Fast forward a couple weeks and I back out there trying again. I picked it up and progressed from there! I do recommend lessons, I think that would of made my first few weeks easier. My buddies took me up the chair after a 10 min lesson on skating from them. They basically said good luck, cya in the bar around noon!

Only one of those buddies still rides and keeps up with me! Cheesy as it is... No pain no gain!

I seem to get worse injuries now than I did learning, I don't wreck very often but when I do it's usually painful. Last year I was reminded to scope out cliffs before you huck your body off them! I followed a line and had a bad time.
 

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I skied for years before I tried boarding in the early 2000's. I picked it up fairly quickly but I had my bruises along the way.

The one that remains a clear memory is the slam on the cat track. I was flat basing to keep up speed through a flat part - at this point I could barely link turns. I caught a front edge and violently slammed on a ice patch. I layed there for what seemed like an eternity just trying to catch my breath! I couldn't sleep or put a Tshirt on by myself for weeks. I was broke back then and did not have insurance so I never went in, pretty sure I atleast cracked my ribs. Maybe a slight concussion too.

Fast forward a couple weeks and I back out there trying again. I picked it up and progressed from there! I do recommend lessons, I think that would of made my first few weeks easier. My buddies took me up the chair after a 10 min lesson on skating from them. They basically said good luck, cya in the bar around noon!

Only one of those buddies still rides and keeps up with me! Cheesy as it is... No pain no gain!

I seem to get worse injuries now than I did learning, I don't wreck very often but when I do it's usually painful. Last year I was reminded to scope out cliffs before you huck your body off them! I followed a line and had a bad time.
there seems to be two kinds of injuries, slow speed beginner injuries that can be really nasty - caught edges, scorpions, etc., and intermediate/advanced rider injuries from either going somewhere you shouldn't, or going too fast.

for me personally my worst injuries came from slow speed at the beginner level, hooked edges in the flats etc, I'm pretty conservative in my riding now but I can't believe how badly I hurt myself at speeds not much faster than walking when I was learning.
 

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I was a 1-day/year rider in 2011. During that 1 day I somehow managed to fall and get a concussion. Everyone was super worried due to my behavior, so they ran a lot of scans and tests that ended up inflating my final cost total to $5k. I have no idea how or where I fell.

So how did I do things differently next season? Bought my first setup and gear, and did a 40-day season =D

.... Oh and bought a helmet.
 

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One of my first beginner spills ended in a hip injury as well. It was my third time ever riding and I was just getting used to carrying a little bit of speed. I probably wasn't going any faster than 25 mph but I somehow unexpectedly caught an edge and slammed on my hip and chest so fast I didn't have time to put my hands up. I just made a loud "HUUUUUUuuuuu" noise as I smacked the ice. Later that night getting into my friends SUV I couldn't lift my left leg up to get in the seat. I ended up lifting my leg up with my arms and throwing it in the footwell so I could climb in. I was back at it a few weeks later.

I've taken many spills since then. Some worse than that day. But, I never once thought about not going back to the hill once I healed up.
 

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TAILBONE!! that was the worst injury I had when I was learning to snowboard. I was lucky that my work was walking distance from my house cuz driving was not feasible. My job as a mechanic keeps me on my feet all day but I would not drive the forklift though. I still went each weekend but I taught myself not to land on my ass when I fall. but the worst part of it was the chairlift, I had to ride by myself and cringe everytime I sit down. It hurt but I was determined to learn how to ride. thank god I kept at it.
 

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First day of snowboarding:
-Bruised tailbone(from falling on my ass so much)
-Twisted ankle(skating and losing control of the board)
-Pulled groin muscle(coming off the lift I put my rear foot down to stop and my board kept going so I did the splits)
-Sprained both wrists(I caught my toe edge so hard and I stuck out my hands to catch myself. I couldnt bend my wrists for 10 mins, I was sure I had just broken both of them)

Could barely walk, couldn't sit at all. I had to lift my legs manually with my arms, I literally could not get them up something small like a curb or a set of stairs. Driving to work was the most painful thing, I stood up for 3 weeks and slept on my stomach. I really wanted to give up after that and not do it anymore.

Then I took lessons and after one, I was able to link turns comfortably but still would fall. After 6, I became much more fluid and natural and began hitting jumps and boxes. I highly recommend professional instruction to anyone getting into snowboarding, save your body the abuse and get trained by someone who knows how to teach.
 

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for me personally my worst injuries came from slow speed at the beginner level, hooked edges in the flats etc,
+1

I've taken some spectacular wipeouts over the years, but I honestly don't think I've ever slammed as hard as I did as a beginner catching an edge at 5 mph.
 

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I couldn't do sit-ups for two weeks after my first snowboarding trip. My tailbone was bruised I think. I had a few slams last time, but I've gotten very good at the art of falling. No pain really, just utter exhaustion.
 

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I had the typical learning curve injuries. Nothing serious, but I took some pretty hard spills on the cat tracks. Luckily none of them gave me concussive symptoms, and the only one that lasted more than a day or two was when I managed to punch my rib somehow. That was more of a serious bruise though, nothing like cracking it. My wife, on the other hand, was getting beat up by camber so badly that we eventually invested in impact pants for her. She got whiplash on a bad spill heel side, and is convinced she concussed herself toe side once. To this day she more or less refuses to ride any camber decks even though they aren't any big deal for her once she's on it.
 

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I don't know if there are any other surfers here, but learning to surf is really hard. Just learning to paddle effectively is like an entire sport requiring practice and endurance training. To Chomps' inititial question, no other sport for me has ever had such a high degree of committment for such a long-awaited reward, or come close.

It pays off though, those paddle muscles are like riding a bike once you can do it.
 

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My worst would obviously be my snapped Achilles two years ago, maybe my sixth or seventh time riding. Going back last season was interesting, as I was determined but definitely nervous (a little) and cautious (a lot). My worst fall last year I straight leg timbered backwards barely moving and I hit the ground so hard I thought I tore my rectum. Awesome. Now, when I get exhausted I call it a day. It helps that my slopes are 30 minutes away, I don't feel guilty leaving, I can just go back the next day. Anyway, I ended up riding 25-30 days last year, with no major dings after that first fall of the year. Now I fall much more gracefully and never stiff legged. Lol
 

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Did never get injured from snowboarding but had some memorable falls.
“First” one: Eagerly trying to follow the new BF, not using the edges properly, I slipped on an icy slope and smashed hip/butt :dizzy:. Could barely walk in the evening, hematoma as big as a DIN A4. Next day: Eagerly trying to follow the new BF, but not using the edges properly, I slipped on an icy slope and smashed hip/butt, AGAIN, the exactly same way and spot. Gosh, that one hurt... Swallow the tears, stand up, pat off snow, and ride again. BF (now husband) uses to say that this was the moment he knew “that’s my girl” :)
Most scary one: the hit-a-fence-pole-beneath-the-deep-pow-full-stop-half-salto-head-down-almost-suffocating fall.
Most painful one: Vividly remember the last caught edge… Had two relatively freshly ruptured neck disks (from horseriding) and had to wear a neck stabilizer. I really shouldn’t have been snowboarding then but… no but, I just did anyway. Caught a back edge and scorpioned backwards, dashing the neck backwards albeit the neck collar. I first thought the neck is broken :blink:. Made me ride by far more defensive the rest of the season :laugh:

From all sports I do/tried, horseriding is the one with most sweat and tears cos the learning curve it not continuous as with other sports. First it takes years till YOU reach a decent level. Then it takes years of education till a young horse reaches a certain level. When the horse gets old, you begin from scratch with a young one: again a lot of sweat and tears. It though is very rewarding to see the development from a reluctant clumsy young almost unable to sort his 4 legs over a 10in “obstacle”, getting scared by everything (a leaf on the track, a shadow, an umbrella, a plastic bag, a straw lying on the ground, ad infinitum) and some years later fearlessly tackling a XC track.
In-between lie many falls with only two options how to react: a) if not badly injured: stand up, pat off the dirt and mount back in the saddle again b) go to A&E. That's not to play tough, but due to the fact the horse should never be rewarded for throwing the rider off. To call it a day after a fall just cos your bones hurt would be a reward for it and can enhance this habit :unsure:
 

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I don't know if there are any other surfers here, but learning to surf is really hard. Just learning to paddle effectively is like an entire sport requiring practice and endurance training. To Chomps' inititial question, no other sport for me has ever had such a high degree of committment for such a long-awaited reward, or come close.

It pays off though, those paddle muscles are like riding a bike once you can do it.
Yeh I very occasionally try to surf.
I can skate, I can snowboard but god damn I can't paddle a surfboard to save my life. At least when learning to snowboard you get dropped at the top of a lift and you have sometimes hours of standing up practice time on the way down to learn, with surfing you might catch one wave for the whole day and spend 2 seconds on it before bailing.
I'm hoping one day it 'clicks' like boarding has though.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I don't know if there are any other surfers here, but learning to surf is really hard. Just learning to paddle effectively is like an entire sport requiring practice and endurance training....
Ah Yes! Surfing! I tried that too,... once! :blink: That would have been about 30 years ago! Socal, San Clemente! I was still in the service. Just Paddling was hard! But then there was, getting out past the breaking swells, judging when to start paddling to put yourself on the face of the incoming wave! And lest we forget, just trying to stand up on the friggin' board, let alone ride it any distance!

And just like with skate boarding,...

....After a good sized wave broke "On Top" of me and body slammed the F*ck out of me, but more specifically, BITCH BOUNCED my godamm face right into the board? Surfing career? Done and DONE!!!:laugh: :eusa_clap: (...I seem to recall having to scrape SexWax off my teeth after that!!) :laugh:

....To Chomps' inititial question, no other sport for me has ever had such a high degree of committment for such a long-awaited reward, or come close....
Yup! Exactly!!!! That is the exact train of thought that lead me to start this thread! After some definitely very painful, but ultimately not really very serious injuries sustained during my first attempts at various other activities. I immediately deemed the potential reward, unlikely to be worth "the beating" I envisioned myself taking!

Not so with snowboarding??!!! Right from the start, I just KNEW! I wanted this!!! I mean, despite that second hip pointer? (...Oh Man! Was that painful!!) I went out and spent a TON of money on my own board set up, boots, helmet and other gear!

For me, Snowboarding has been worth every single bruise, bump, sprain, strain, twist, tear, severe arthritic episode, and last but not least, painful and humiliating wishbone & fail dismounting the lifts, etc!!! ;)
 

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For me, the injuries were/are more psychological. I don’t have a ton of natural athletic ability – my talents are definitely in other areas – although I do work out regularly, keep myself in good shape, and oddly, enjoy athletic activities (glutton for punishment I guess). I’m still a beginner snowboarder, and I’d be embarrassed to tell you how many times I went out last season, but I can’t really link turns yet. And yes, I’ve had 3 (or maybe 4?) lessons plus practice on my own. I’ve definitely been frustrated but keep going back for more. There’s something about snowboarding that’s addictive . . .

I don't know if there are any other surfers here, but learning to surf is really hard . . .
I surf ~2 weeks out of the year when I visit my family in Florida, and I find it much more frustrating than snowboarding. I just don’t see my skills consistently progressing like I do in snowboarding, where I do see slooow but steady progress. I agree that it probably has something to do with this:
With surfing you might catch one wave for the whole day and spend 2 seconds on it before bailing.
It’s also not as addictive for me as snowboarding for some reason.
 

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From all sports I do/tried, horseriding is the one with most sweat and tears
+100 And it was seriously addictive for me until the accident that resulted in 5 broken bones, a punctured/collapsed lung, 2 surgeries, and over a week in the hospital (and this was only a few months after a concussion + cracked tailbone). I quit after that. :( I still miss it . . . but took up snowboarding instead . . . :)
 

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I was lucky enough to learn when I was 11, so I healed easily! Plenty of sore knees and butt cheeks though...

The fiancee learned in her late 20's and had a tougher time of it. Took the better part of a season for her to really start to get semi-comfortable, but at the same time she loved it.

What is it about adults learning to snowboard that makes them want to persevere?!? :dunno:
 

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For me, Snowboarding has been worth every single bruise, bump, sprain, strain, twist, tear, severe arthritic episode, and last but not least, painful and humiliating wishbone & fail dismounting the lifts, etc!!! ;)
Absolutely! I've had week long trips to Jay Peak where on day one I landed hard on my chest, and continued to ride hard for 4 days (advil does wonders!)... Got back to Canada and right to the hospital where they hooked me up to machine to see if I had fluid around my heart! :blink:

It's the only thing where I'll play through the pain because the reward is so worth it!
 
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