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Leg blasters. Google it, do em till u puke u weakling. Then u will crush with bEastly fashion! Or buy a peloton
 

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It sure makes riding in a proper athletic stance a lot more natural and increases range of motion a lot, especially for heelside turns. Maybe not so useful in the park, but sure helps in tight trees.


I would argue that it unnaturally forces you into an athletic stance. Since the high back is forcing you into this position, it is hardly a naturally occurring position, therefore not “natural”. Any potential gain in range of motion in the bottom of a squat is lost since it decreases your range of motion at the top because you can’t relax and stand all the way up. Better to learn how to move your body into this position.

Again, forward lean has it place for someone who is looking for a mechanical advantage to leverage their heel side, but this is not a beginner who needs to learn the fundamentals of body positioning.
 

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Properly leveraging heelside turns. Forward lean in the bindings should be used as more of an adjustment for an advanced rider looking for an exact performance outcome not as a learning crutch.
What specific mechanics are involved in “properly leveraging” heelside turns that are circumvented by forward lean though? As far as I can tell it doesn’t take the place of anything—it just amplifies the effect of technique that’s already happening.

I mean why have high backs at all if not to add leverage?
 

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What specific mechanics are involved in “properly leveraging” heelside turns that are circumvented by forward lean though? As far as I can tell it doesn’t take the place of anything—it just amplifies the effect of technique that’s already happening.

I mean why have high backs at all if not to add leverage?
The forward lean of high backs adds a positive mechanical advantage to positioning the weight of the body to maximize the transfer of energy into the heel edge on steep angles. It’s basic physics. One can achieve this same ends through proper body positioning and that is a fundamental aspect of snowboarding that one should learn.
 

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The forward lean of high backs adds a positive mechanical advantage to positioning the weight of the body to maximize the transfer of energy into the heel edge on steep angles. It’s basic physics. One can achieve this same ends through proper body positioning and that is a fundamental aspect of snowboarding that one should learn.
I find that it enables me to very quickly steer the front of the board through very rapid turns like roller coaster rides through trees with very small lower body motions. It also allows my legs to absorb bumps easily even when hard on my heel edge.
 

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I find that it enables me to very quickly steer the front of the board through very rapid turns like roller coaster rides through trees with very small lower body motions. It also allows my legs to absorb bumps easily even when hard on my heel edge.
That’s great. However, I suspect that you are using forward lean to enhance competent technique, not as a solution to overcome poor technique.
Sports require specific skill, specific technique and sufficient strength. Skills and technique are practiced in order to improve performance. The OP needs to address his technique and strengthen his body. Perhaps further down the line, once he has become an intermediate +/advanced rider, he will find that forward lean enhances his technique as well.
 

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The forward lean of high backs adds a positive mechanical advantage to positioning the weight of the body to maximize the transfer of energy into the heel edge on steep angles. It’s basic physics. One can achieve this same ends through proper body positioning and that is a fundamental aspect of snowboarding that one should learn.
Sorry, but I’m still not sure why this applies to forward lean, specifically, but not any of the other tools we use to snowboard. High backs exist in the first place to provide a mechanical advantage. Snowboard-specific boots exist to provide a mechanical advantage (and, I should add, have forward lean built in). Should beginners do without both?
 

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At a minimum its good to have the forward lean set so that there is no gap between the high back and the boot. This will give instant response otherwise you are waiting for that gap to fill to some degree when you initiate a turn.

Not saying you have to do this but just be aware of whats happening. On my park board I don't run any forward lean but I do on all my other boards.
 

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At a minimum its good to have the forward lean set so that there is no gap between the high back and the boot. This will give instant response otherwise you are waiting for that gap to fill to some degree when you initiate a turn.

Not saying you have to do this but just be aware of whats happening. On my park board I don't run any forward lean but I do on all my other boards.
I have lots of forward lean, and very stiff boots. This makes for very fast edge response. When I got those stiff boots, I was amazed how much better I could control the edge for carving. I need way less knee motion to get the same solid edge angle. As a 71 YO, I don't go near the boxes and rails, If I did, I might have made different choices.
 

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I have lots of forward lean, and very stiff boots. This makes for very fast edge response. When I got those stiff boots, I was amazed how much better I could control the edge for carving. I need way less knee motion to get the same solid edge angle. As a 71 YO, I don't go near the boxes and rails, If I did, I might have made different choices.
Interestingly, I started out with stiffer boots (Thirty-Two Focus Boas) and recently moved to a somewhat softer boot.
 

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I've been going back towards a softer set up for most things lately. Really, I'm into lateral flex and toe/heel response. I find forward lean restricts my lateral movement too much. I match the static lean on my boots with the highbacks.

I found forward lean and stiff boots to be helpful when I was struggling to control my board. As I progressed, it just seemed to get in my way and be uncomfortable. I still have stiff bindings on my aggressive freeride board, but I match the highback's lean to my boots.
 

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Sorry, but I’m still not sure why this applies to forward lean, specifically, but not any of the other tools we use to snowboard. High backs exist in the first place to provide a mechanical advantage. Snowboard-specific boots exist to provide a mechanical advantage (and, I should add, have forward lean built in). Should beginners do without both?
I think it's because if you FORCE yourself into a crouch with the highbacks, you don't have the same amount of fine tuning motion range with knee/ankle/toe adjustment as if when you would be crouched low "naturally". With the first, you are fixated to that fwd angle. Knees, ankles are forced into a certain angle. Hips n upper body have to adjust to that fixated fwd lean, too, to balance out. There's no give and take, highback is there, period. You lean into them and at that very angle they sit, you will give the pressure.

If there's not a fixated lean OTOH, you can move your butt/legs more far behind over the edge and fine adjust the heelside tilt by lifting toes.
Leverage over heel edge via highbacks is more like the brute force in comparison.

I don't use any fwd lean as the MOW conda I use have more than enough for me at zero position.
 

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Sorry, but I’m still not sure why this applies to forward lean, specifically, but not any of the other tools we use to snowboard. High backs exist in the first place to provide a mechanical advantage. Snowboard-specific boots exist to provide a mechanical advantage (and, I should add, have forward lean built in). Should beginners do without both?
That's because what he's saying is ridiculous. Nothing in snowboard is "natural". Natural for us is to walk, and definitely not sideways with a plank stuck to our feet, bound by stiff boots.

Forward lean certainly doesn't HINDER learning proper technique, so it can't be "wrong" to use it to learn or whenever. Essentially, you can learn proper anything with or without fwd lean.

So a powder board makes it easier to ride on powder... should you learn on a shitty park twin to "learn proper pow riding"? No.
Stiff cambered boards help develop proper technique... should riders learn park on stiff camber boards "to learn proper technique"? No.
 

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That's because what he's saying is ridiculous. Nothing in snowboard is "natural". Natural for us is to walk, and definitely not sideways with a plank stuck to our feet, bound by stiff boots.

Forward lean certainly doesn't HINDER learning proper technique, so it can't be "wrong" to use it to learn or whenever. Essentially, you can learn proper anything with or without fwd lean.

So a powder board makes it easier to ride on powder... should you learn on a shitty park twin to "learn proper pow riding"? No.
Stiff cambered boards help develop proper technique... should riders learn park on stiff camber boards "to learn proper technique"? No.
We’re not talking about powder boards. We talking about excessive forward lean vs. learning how to use your body. It’s not a forward lean issue, it a movement pattern issue. Being a dick in your response doesn’t change the fact that the OP needs to learn how to ride a snowboard with proper body mechanics. Goddamn....
 

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We’re not talking about powder boards. We talking about excessive forward lean vs. learning how to use your body. It’s not a forward lean issue, it a movement pattern issue. Being a dick in your response doesn’t change the fact that the OP needs to learn how to ride a snowboard with proper body mechanics. Goddamn....
LOL oooooohhh somebody's triggered cause others don't agree with their nonsense.

OP and anybody can learn proper technique WITH or WITHOUT fwd lean.
"excessive" is a word YOU plugged in to try and plug some sense into your nonsense. Nobody talked about excessive fwd lean until you did.
 

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Consistent feedback I'm getting from more experienced riders is that I'm 'bending at the waist' , 'hunched over'. I absolutely agree with them although when I try to 'straighten up', I feel much more off-balance, even a bit uncomfortable. No doubt if I can improve my posture I can dramatically improve my general riding, carving and balance. I do ride with quite a bit of forward lean in my bindings to help with heelside carving, in case that might affect things. I try to 'sit in chair' on heelside and 'tilt pelvis' for toeside (humping motion - pardon the expression, though that's the way other's have described to me), though it's difficult to do consistently.

I'm guessing I have some tight muscles/imbalances contributing. (Dayjob at computer, hunched forward - definitely doesn't help) Anyone else experience the same?

I'm going to talk to my physio but hoping to hear from other snowboarders what's been helpful. Any suggestions you can offer for stretches/exercises, both pre and post-snowboarding session?

Thanks
Dear snowboarder of the internet,

Check this out and listen to this guy. Specifically listen to what he says at 1:03:

And don't listen to that guy above.

Love,
F1EA
xoxo
 

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We’re not talking about powder boards. We talking about excessive forward lean vs. learning how to use your body. It’s not a forward lean issue, it a movement pattern issue. Being a dick in your response doesn’t change the fact that the OP needs to learn how to ride a snowboard with proper body mechanics. Goddamn....
So... what specific movement pattern does forward lean interfere with learning?
 

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I think it's because if you FORCE yourself into a crouch with the highbacks, you don't have the same amount of fine tuning motion range with knee/ankle/toe adjustment as if when you would be crouched low "naturally". With the first, you are fixated to that fwd angle. Knees, ankles are forced into a certain angle. Hips n upper body have to adjust to that fixated fwd lean, too, to balance out. There's no give and take, highback is there, period. You lean into them and at that very angle they sit, you will give the pressure.

If there's not a fixated lean OTOH, you can move your butt/legs more far behind over the edge and fine adjust the heelside tilt by lifting toes.
Leverage over heel edge via highbacks is more like the brute force in comparison.

I don't use any fwd lean as the MOW conda I use have more than enough for me at zero position.
This is interesting. Would you say you'd even prefer a gap between the "lean" of your boots and the lean of your highbacks for more flexibility? To me it seems like that would take me out of a crouch more often than not--like, to make contact with my highbacks my knees and ankles would have to be straighter, when I want the contact to happen when they're bent.

Forward lean gives me contact in what is already my natural riding position, but I wouldn't say it forces me into it.
 

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I don't even think I need highbacks with how good boots and straps have gotten. No Highback Theory- Mike RanquetIf your body mechanics are on point and you're stacking weight over the edge properly, I don't see the need for forward lean. It's just uncomfortable. I've got respect for Ryan Kanpton, but I don't agree with him here. There's more than one way to get your carve on- shred your own shred. If you like that feeling, go for it! I don't feel forward lean is the only way to ride well.

To the OP, maybe try out some lean. It'll force you into a more proper attack position and you can learn what that feels like and what to shoot for. Experiments like this are good- they can teach you a lot.
 

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Without forward lean you can only bend the knees properly if you put the board on edge. Otherwise you'd have to bend at the waist as well. I think that a bit of forward lean helps out.

I suppose that if you ride with really soft boots and bindings you could do it without forward lean.
 
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