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The snowboarder that talks about boards being quick edge to edge will enjoy forward lean.
He rocks his lower body from side to side. Giving no time to his turns, yeah its quick edge to edge he claims as he procedes almost in a straight line down the hill.

Its bad form, he usually has his jacket open as he rides, I see him daily.

The snowboarder who gives time to his turns does not talk about quick edge to edge for he spends time on this edge, then time on that one.
The time it takes to flip edges is irrelevant.
To this snowboarder forward lean becomes irrelevant, next on his list of unnecessary things are stiff boots and stiff boards.
 

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As for stretches, start by assessing your normal stance as a human.
Many of us have nerd neck and our butts poking out before we even strap in.
Hips forward like a little boy doing a pee is the cure, it is also a toe turn friendly position to be in.
Knees together. Hips forward for toe turns.
Knees apart, sit on the toilet for heel turns.
 

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The snowboarder that talks about boards being quick edge to edge will enjoy forward lean.
He rocks his lower body from side to side. Giving no time to his turns, yeah its quick edge to edge he claims as he procedes almost in a straight line down the hill.

Its bad form, he usually has his jacket open as he rides, I see him daily.

The snowboarder who gives time to his turns does not talk about quick edge to edge for he spends time on this edge, then time on that one.
The time it takes to flip edges is irrelevant.
To this snowboarder forward lean becomes irrelevant, next on his list of unnecessary things are stiff boots and stiff boards.
The time it takes to flip edge to edge is critical in tight trees or for controlling speed in narrow steeps. It is a different way of riding than cruising carves on the groomers.
 

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As for stretches, start by assessing your normal stance as a human.
Many of us have nerd neck and our butts poking out before we even strap in.
Hips forward like a little boy doing a pee is the cure, it is also a toe turn friendly position to be in.
Knees together. Hips forward for toe turns.
Knees apart, sit on the toilet for heel turns.
For anyone trying to lock in toe edge carves, starting a carve and then arching your back strongly can be quite a revelation. Knees together will make the board handle more like a soft rockered board, for easier turns in soft snow, while pushing the knees apart will effectively increase the camber, for increased edge hold on hard snow or ice.
 

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Depends on your stance angles I think. My natural 'attack' stance already has more lean on the rear, even when I had a mild duck stance and when i did longboarding. On a longboard, you can change your 'stance' so I could see that more fwd = speed, stability, flow and power through turns. While duck or less fwd was better for 'freestyle' and sliding because that's what I moved my feet to when doing different stuff.... so I carried that over I guess.

This is all with ++ stance:
http://instagr.am/p/BNe_Ny4DsPL/ http://instagr.am/p/yyuXlBGUxK/
In the end, I tried different stances and settled with what felt better overall and with compromises here and there. I can still ride different stances, and it's still ok. It's not that it's unrideable.

I kinda thought about and evolved my stance from this:
So those maniacs are jumping all over their boards with varying stances. What is your end compromise? I rock forward stance on all my boards. Do you vary the stance by what type of riding you’ll be doing? I tend to find myself “always bombing”. Just wondering if it is a product of my personality or stance.
 

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The snowboarder that talks about boards being quick edge to edge will enjoy forward lean.
He rocks his lower body from side to side. Giving no time to his turns, yeah its quick edge to edge he claims as he procedes almost in a straight line down the hill.

Its bad form, he usually has his jacket open as he rides, I see him daily.

The snowboarder who gives time to his turns does not talk about quick edge to edge for he spends time on this edge, then time on that one.
The time it takes to flip edges is irrelevant.
To this snowboarder forward lean becomes irrelevant, next on his list of unnecessary things are stiff boots and stiff boards.
Quick edge to edge is very important. There's far more than open groomed runs a mountain can offer.
But forward lean/stiff boots/stiff boards are irrelevant though.

As for stretches, start by assessing your normal stance as a human.
Many of us have nerd neck and our butts poking out before we even strap in.
Hips forward like a little boy doing a pee is the cure, it is also a toe turn friendly position to be in.
Knees together. Hips forward for toe turns.
Knees apart, sit on the toilet for heel turns.
Hips forward/sitting on the toilet is just one way of doing turns that use your upper body (imo less effective way because cog will be outside of your board and it will be tricky on hard snow). Check the way Japanese riders carve and how they contract their body and put a lot pressure on edge without moving their cog too far outside of the board.
 

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What boots are those? I ride hardboots and they flex so that I had to replace one of the buckles because it got busted from contact with one of the others. I have no experience in softboots, but from how a human body works I would say this: In order to drive a powerful toeside, you need to get your knee down. I don't know how you would do that without ankle flex.
For me, the whole point of stiff boots is so I don't need to bend my knees nearly as far to engage the toe edge firmly, which gives much stronger response. When I got my first pair of stiff boots, it made a huge difference in carving.
 

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For me, the whole point of stiff boots is so I don't need to bend my knees nearly as far to engage the toe edge firmly, which gives much stronger response. When I got my first pair of stiff boots, it made a huge difference in carving.
I've found that proper body position on toesides makes a lot more difference. It was like lightning striking when the instructor managed to get me to do it right (humping the air). I use a softer boot nowadays, because I can.
 
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