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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, going to work a season in america when i finish school (from Australia) and interested on what everyone thinks is best job to work? Im currently a register operator so by the time i will go will have 4 years experience handling cash and face to face customer service, i also have child care experience if that will help.
I was thinking about being a liftie, sounds like fun / not to hard. But it doesn't sound like i'd get much ride time (anyone know how much i would get?)

Dont really care about making a profit for the season but i want to make enough not to lose money over the season (i.e enough to pay rent, food etc). I'll be 18 when i go so i wont be able to go out to much at night, so happy to save money in that respect.

Night jobs the best?
and suggested resort?

:confused: :eek:
 

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There's a bunch of threads about it on here and the general consensus is that it's the worst idea ever if what you want to do is ski/board.
 

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Snowolf is right. I worked as an instructor and yeah, you had to be a line-up for lessons at certain times of the day... but you can usually make first tracks before (if you don't have private lesson) and get tons of turn in throughout the day... And if you get a lesson that can really tear it up?!? You literally get to shred your brains out while getting PAID... You gotta have the skills to teach better riders, but if you can do it, I 100% would vote for instructor... Unless you are a fair-weather rider, cause you have to be out there, rain or shine, -20 or 60 degrees... And if you are outgoing and can sell yourself (I got business cards), then you get push private lessons and end up getting paid 20 to 30 dollars an hour... At one point during the height of the season, I was getting paid $25/hour (not including tips) to ride powder in the glades with advanced lessons... Yeah, that job really sucked...:confused:
 

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I work graveyards at one of the hotels up at Snowbird and it's awesome. I get off at 8, change into my gear, and am first person in line when the lifts open at 9. Ride for a few hours, go home and crash, then back at it again. Never worry about missing out on pow cus the canyon road is closed, since I'm already up there! Plus your always in a good mood since its just so damn beautiful up there.
 

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I actually only teach about 20 days a season and the the rest of the time I am free riding and enjoying the free season pass, a free season locker, 50% discount on food and and equipment, free training clinics, Great social interaction with good riders and skiers, free letters to ride anywhere in the west for free (10 days at Alyeska every other year and have never bought a lift ticket). Yeah that is hard to cope with.
Shhhh...don't tell everyone what a great deal it is. You've perfectly described my situation the past couple of seasons, I think I have one of the best jobs at a resort. I've ridden about 50 days this season and so far only had to teach about 12 of those days. And even the teaching days have all been fun.
 

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What's with the military time? Your making my head explode.
... Seriously? If it's under 12 it's AM, if it's over subtract 12 and it's PM.

I read an article in a magazine recently that made it sound as if pro Ski Patrol is in need of more personnel.
I don't know about that, Ski Patrol jobs are sort of like the resort version of being on the board of Goldman Sachs. They are often highly exclusive and given to those who have connections. Might be different on the East Coast due to tiny mountains.
 

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I don't know anything about working a resort from a personal perspective but i know 3 people right now all working at afferent resorts. One in Fernie, one in Whistler and one in Breckenridge. All three of them actually love doing what they do, they all have free season passes and about 50% off food on the mountain plus other perks like Snowolf said like first tracks and riding after close.

The guy at Breck i forgot what he actually does but he wear the yellow jacket (there are red, yellow, blue, and black jackets denoting jobs i believe) and he works 4 days a week. During his 4 days he routinely logs 16000 vertical feet per day so it would be fair to assume thats a good bit of riding. Anyway just thought i would say if thats what you want to do i know 3 guys who are loving it right now. I guess they are not part of the 95%......
 

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I don't know about that, Ski Patrol jobs are sort of like the resort version of being on the board of Goldman Sachs. They are often highly exclusive and given to those who have connections. Might be different on the East Coast due to tiny mountains.
The gist of the article was that the average age of pro patrol is rising (it was something like age 45-55 or so) as there are few young people who want to enter that line of work. They expressed concern that as the older patrollers retire there would come a shortfall of personnel, and they wanted to encourage younger people to consider a career in patrol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wooah! Thanks everyone for your opinions!
How hard is it to get a Groomer Job having had no experience? I notice that a lot of places state a minimum amount of experience.

REASONS FOR WORKING FOR RESORT -
- Free Lift Pass
- Food Discounts
- Equipment Discounts (Going when im 18, i plan to buy a whole setup as ill be at the end of my growing)
- Employee Accommodation (Coming from Australia, having pre-arranged accommodation would be wonderful)

:)
 

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Does anyone know if American resorts accept CASI certified instructors, or would you have to take the tests all over again?
 

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It's a moot point because it doesn't apply to the OP (this won't happen for someone in their first season), but to say "NOBODY" can have fun working at a resort is just wrong.

If you think your gonna ride fresh powder every morning..unless your ski patrol forget it!
If you cultivate your clientele correctly you can be riding fresh pow when it hits and skipping lift lines as a bonus.

NOBODY will have fun at any resort unless you are there specifically to enjoy the place and not work there. you wont ride any more than a customer will....your working:laugh:
Have you ever worked at a West Coast resort? When you're skipping lift lines on a pow day, riding three laps to the average customers (and off duty employees) one, all while working the best paying non-management job on the hill, work is very, very, fun.
 

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Technically that is true Argo. From a practical sense however, to get an instructor job at a destination resort, you had better be at least a cert 1 and if you want to actually have a chance to teach good lessons and privates, you had better be a cert 2.

Random Hero, yes AASI recognizes CASI and the CASI standards are actually a little higher. Typically, an AASI level 2 is considered CASI level 1. If you have a CASI 2 and come to work in the US you can pay your dues and may have to take an evaluation exam and you in.

I've been really surprised that about half the instructors I've met in vail are not certified. They make a big deal of it when they do get their certain... I used to think they all were.....
 
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