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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all the great snowboarders out there, I'm stuck in a limbo on three boards and would really appreciate your professional and experienced advices.:

1) 157cm, 2021 Capita Mercury (Pre-Ordered, no option to cancel order) - S$805
2) 157cm, 2020 Jones Mountain Twin (On hand, won as a free gift) - S$Free
3) 155cm, 2021 YES Typo (Thinking of buying) S$620 - 680

I know I might have jumped the gun and got too excited and hooked onto snowboarding that I bought boards that may be too advanced for me, please don't bash me for it as I know I might have screwed up thus seeking for advice here so as to not waste any money further

Stats about me: 170-177lbs, 5'9"
Experience Level: Approximately 10 days of riding under belt - I can now link turns in both directions on green (beginner) and intermediate (blue/red) slopes. Have attempted Blacks, but mostly 'C' turns on them. My turns are skidded "S" shape turns with little to no carve lines; mostly skidded and I can mostly able to control my speed if I feel it’s uncomfortable. Boarded at Mount Hotham in icy Australia and did okay okay on Blue/Red equivalent-Intermediate runs except for flat cat tracks where i kept catching an edge.
Board used: Bought a second hand YES Basic (2011-2013 model) for a dirt cheap price instead of using rentals.
Days Planned to ride yearly: On average 7-14 days / year

Would like to seek for advice on the feasibility and/or practicality on the above mentioned three boards, with the following questions:

1) Is the YES Typo more forgiving board among the three with the 2mm raise nose and tail rocker? As the Flex people reviewed actually feels like 4-5/10 instead of YES Rated at 6.10.

2) Are there a lot of overlap between these three boards?

3) Should I then purchase the YES Typo for better progression on board before moving to either the Mercury or Mountain Twin?

4a) If I should purchase the YES Typo, what size would be best? the 155 or 158?
4b) If I should NOT purchase the YES Typo, is it because of the overlap? And which board would be more forgiving to learn on and which to sell (Mercury or MT)?

Thank ya'll in advance!
 

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I have Mercury 2020 157 ~86 kg, 9,5 US), my bud owns Typo 2018 155 (he’s 70 kg, 9 US) so I can give you the insight into these, I haven’t been on the Mountain Twin.

You seem to be stoked and motivated to improve your riding and so was my bud from the very early on. He got his Typo around day 6-8 on snow and since he could already link turns (no ruddering) he enjoyed it very much from that day.

I’d say Typo in 157 would be a perfect choice for you now as you won’t have any problem handling it but it will still offer many days of progression on piste and in the park.

The only issue is that you already own Yes Basic that should be a budget version of the Typo. The Basic already offers you a friendly progression at your level.

The Mercury has a way more aggressive feel than the Typo. I have noticed that and so did my friend on his ~~40th day on snow last season when he was already able to leave a thin carve line with a grab on the heelside (he usually rode Amplid Surfari 157 last season).

You say you own the Mercury and the Mountain Twin already. If money is not an issue you can take them out when you feel the Basic starts lacking in carving.

In your current quiver the Typo makes no sense, even though it’s the board that at this very moment is the best choice from these for you imo.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Hi @Yeahti87 , thanks for your quick message and advices.

Yes I am very motivated! Though I'm new but I'm very much addicted to snowboarding (even though I'm not good enough) and I read too much and watch too much that led me to buy the Capita Mercury on impulse.

Thanks for the insights as its really helpful. I had the same thought as what you mentioned in the last part.

Now that I have your insights on Mercury and the Typo, I'm not sure if the Mountain Twin can "replace" the Typo as the 'best choice' board for me as I understand from reading websites that the 2020 Mountain Twin is not as stiff as Jones rated it to be 7/10 and feels more 5-6/10 instead. And the Typo I read that it feels like 4.5/10 instead of YES rating it as 6/10.

I'm in a dilemma now, whether to:
1) Sell the Mountain Twin or the Mercury and buy the Typo?
Or
2) sell both the Mountain Twin and Mercury and buy the Typo, as like you said, the Typo is at this very moment the best choice for me... (BTW, I've sold away the 2011-2013 YES Basic Already, I found it lost its profile shape etc alr...)

Really unsure if keeping either the MT or Mercury and buying a Typo, would there be a huge overlap. But I'm sure the Jones MT and Mercury has a huge overlap now.

Hopefully someone who's familiar with the MT and other 2 boards for comparison can help. Though now can safely conclude that the Mercury have to wait at my level.

Thanks again!
 

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I haven’t been on the MT but it’s a camrocker and if it’s not stiffer than the Mercury it would be my pick from the two. I’ve put 2 buds their first season (2 day instructor lessons first so again no self-learnt rudder boys) on Rossi One LF and Jibsaw which are also camrocks and they both enjoy progressing on these without catching the edge.
@zc1 has had the Mercury and a couple of Jones boards.
 

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I haven't ridden any of these boards, so just a general opinion - MT is suitable for your level and potential progression path. A more experienced rider might appreciate Mercury for certain riding style, but with your number of days per year it can take you a few years to get there. By then there will be a new Mercury with new technologies, etc. So if you'd like to keep it simple, you could sell Mercury and keep MT.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks @Yeahti87 ! Just that the online review I can find in comparison with Jones MT vs Mercury is on Youtube, and the reviewer mentioned that the jones MT is softer in flex like a 5/10 insteaad of the rated 7/10 by Jones vs. the Mercury at the correct feel of 6.5/10. However he was riding the 154 Jones MT vs the 157 Mercury which I found to be an off comparison too regarding flex as the 154 will definitely feel softer.

@lbs123 - thanks for your advice! So you think the 2020 MT is really suitable for my level? Especially at 157cm when the ideal learning board for my weight is 154/155cm? I'm really quite unclear on what I should do... hmm...
 

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I'd say the Mountain Twin is perfect for you, and pretty much any intermediate rider. Especially at that size it covers all the bases for you. Later if you get into a lot of freestyle/jibs you can go smaller, if you want to carve hard you can get something more aggressive.

Point is, the Mountain Twin is a board that you won't outgrow and by the time you feel like you want something different, you'll really know what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'd say the Mountain Twin is perfect for you, and pretty much any intermediate rider. Especially at that size it covers all the bases for you. Later if you get into a lot of freestyle/jibs you can go smaller, if you want to carve hard you can get something more aggressive.

Point is, the Mountain Twin is a board that you won't outgrow and by the time you feel like you want something different, you'll really know what you want.
Hi @drblast ! Thanks for your inputs. My worry now is that the Mountain Twin might be too stiff and torsionally stiff for me to learn proper fundamental riding at my experience level mentioned above. Though I’ve read that the 2020 MT that I own now is softer than years before, but it is still not as forgiving at the 2021 or the Typo. My understanding could be flawed, do correct me, but I somehow feel that I might not be able to progress as well on MT vs. a softer board when classified as ‘higher end beginner’ or ‘very Low end intermediate’ who can just skid S turns gently and not yet learn how to be Super aggressive.

Also, may I ask, how high is the rocker for the MT? As the typo is slated to be 2-4-2mm , is the MT considered the same profile?

thanks!
 

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Well, here's my theory on this and you can take it or leave it. Remember that I learned in the 90's when there was no such thing as a beginner board, just cheap boards that sucked. The board I learned on was a full camber 163w 27cm waist width monster that's so stiff and heavy nobody would buy it today. As far as I'm concerned you could totally go ride on the Mercury and it would be fine. But...

It is easier for beginners to learn to ride on the most forgiving board they can find, which for beginners is usually a soft rocker board. That gets you to the point where you're comfortable linking turns, have your balance and weight mostly figured out, and aren't catching edges.

Once you get to that point where you can ride blues without falling, I'd recommend riding the most challenging board you aren't afraid to ride which is usually a little stiffer with some camber. That kind of board will give you way more feedback so you learn to do things the right way, with a better sense of how you need to balance and weight everything. It's not that if you do something wrong you're going to fall - a lot of times you can just feel yourself do something wrong even though you ride away clean.

My wife spent a few beginner seasons on a rocker board and got the hang of it and could do most runs very slowly, but only really enjoyed riding in powder. Then one season she got on the female version of the mountain twin and you could see an immediate improvement in her riding; faster, more confident, well balanced. She improved so much that season because she had feedback from the board that forced her to ride correctly. Same for multiple friends I've taught to ride - as soon as they get on that more aggressive board their riding improves dramatically.

And that's how I've learned everything I can do halfway decently - bite the bullet and do it the hard way. It took me a long time to get good at switch riding until I flipped the bindings around on a directional board and forced myself to only ride switch. It sucked, but only for a day, and I improved way faster.

It's all about how you have fun though. If it's me I want to spend as few days as possible sucking at something. So if I had 14 days to go riding I'd want to challenge myself for about three days so I could do things for the next 11 that I wasn't able to do before rather than take the full 14 days to get there. That's fun to me. But fun to other people is learning at a slower pace and messing around more.

So my advice is to not worry about a board being too difficult to ride because, within reason, your skill level will come up to match it within a few days. Exceptions are boards that everybody says things like "you have to be on your A game to ride this." The Mountain Twin and Mercury are not that kind of board.
 

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@Legendaryl
You have what you need already, IMO. You have a Yes Basic and a Jones Mountain Twin.
If you haven't ridden the JMT, ride it for a while before over-thinking yourself out of it.
Overthinking and what-ifs are deadly. If you really want the Mercury, complete the order, but at this point, you probably don't need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, here's my theory on this and you can take it or leave it. Remember that I learned in the 90's when there was no such thing as a beginner board, just cheap boards that sucked. The board I learned on was a full camber 163w 27cm waist width monster that's so stiff and heavy nobody would buy it today. As far as I'm concerned you could totally go ride on the Mercury and it would be fine. But...

It is easier for beginners to learn to ride on the most forgiving board they can find, which for beginners is usually a soft rocker board. That gets you to the point where you're comfortable linking turns, have your balance and weight mostly figured out, and aren't catching edges.

Once you get to that point where you can ride blues without falling, I'd recommend riding the most challenging board you aren't afraid to ride which is usually a little stiffer with some camber. That kind of board will give you way more feedback so you learn to do things the right way, with a better sense of how you need to balance and weight everything. It's not that if you do something wrong you're going to fall - a lot of times you can just feel yourself do something wrong even though you ride away clean.

My wife spent a few beginner seasons on a rocker board and got the hang of it and could do most runs very slowly, but only really enjoyed riding in powder. Then one season she got on the female version of the mountain twin and you could see an immediate improvement in her riding; faster, more confident, well balanced. She improved so much that season because she had feedback from the board that forced her to ride correctly. Same for multiple friends I've taught to ride - as soon as they get on that more aggressive board their riding improves dramatically.

And that's how I've learned everything I can do halfway decently - bite the bullet and do it the hard way. It took me a long time to get good at switch riding until I flipped the bindings around on a directional board and forced myself to only ride switch. It sucked, but only for a day, and I improved way faster.

It's all about how you have fun though. If it's me I want to spend as few days as possible sucking at something. So if I had 14 days to go riding I'd want to challenge myself for about three days so I could do things for the next 11 that I wasn't able to do before rather than take the full 14 days to get there. That's fun to me. But fun to other people is learning at a slower pace and messing around more.

So my advice is to not worry about a board being too difficult to ride because, within reason, your skill level will come up to match it within a few days. Exceptions are boards that everybody says things like "you have to be on your A game to ride this." The Mountain Twin and Mercury are not that kind of board.
Hi @drblast, I understand where you're coming from regarding the 'past not having hybrid boards then', but with all due respect, i believe that since technology is here to aid in improving or making things easier for us, we should use it?(no disrespect intended and I respect all veterans snowboarders who went through the tough route so that the next generation can reap the benefits).

Thank you for sharing your experience and I feel the same as you in terms of 'only wanting to suck at something for a short period of time'. I'm pretty much alone in the sport (no family or friends interested) as I'm stuck having to learn for myself and/or hire coach (but because I'm alone most of the time when I board, everything is more expensive). Therefore I do not want a scenario where it is "Eventually be able grow into the board, just a matter of time" and rather have "This board fits you and your level now, ride it and become better". But it sounds like the MT isn't something that is overly far for me at this moment compared to the mercury, so I'll attempt to try it and hopefully, like your wife, able to gain that speed and confidence and improve dramatically.

Thanks so much!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@Legendaryl
You have what you need already, IMO. You have a Yes Basic and a Jones Mountain Twin.
If you haven't ridden the JMT, ride it for a while before over-thinking yourself out of it.
Overthinking and what-ifs are deadly. If you really want the Mercury, complete the order, but at this point, you probably don't need it.
Hi @MountainMystic , thanks for you advices too! I don't know what I don't know, thus seeking for advice. You're right that I've been too geeked out on snowboarding that I'm over-reading/over-watching/over-buying on equipments. I don't have the 2011-2013 basic anymore. Have sold it. And seems like everyone is in-line that Mercury is not as favourable for me to the MT, thus I will sell the Mercury and ride the MT instead.

Thank you mate!
 

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MT 157 weight range is listed as 130-180 lbs so if you are around 170-177lbs it should feel even a bit softer. You would out of the range on 154 (120 - 170 lbs). Another factor is that 157 is 3mm wider which depending on your boot size can play some role.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
MT 157 weight range is listed as 130-180 lbs so if you are around 170-177lbs it should feel even a bit softer. You would out of the range on 154 (120 - 170 lbs). Another factor is that 157 is 3mm wider which depending on your boot size can play some role.
Hi @lbs123! Thanks! I think though I’m at the upper range of the weight. My thoughts WERE that it’s not my weight but my experience level and not know how to manipulate my strength/weight over different parts of the board to fully utilise the advantage of being ‘heavier so should feel softer’ ... that was my thoughts. Also read that the MT is stiffer torsionally as compared to Mercury
 
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