Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm a 50 year old female just learning to snowboard. Can only handle about 2 hours each time before it kicks my butt. I'm not planning on doing any jumps, boxes, rails, etc. I just want a board to go down the mountain on. I am on green runs and would like to get to blue runs - not interested in diamond or black runs. Just want to easily cruise down the hill with some s curves and linking turns. The guy at the pro shop suggested I get a flat rocker board (not a banana board). But some internet reading suggests that's more for doing jumps, etc. so I am confused. Would a 0 degree rocker board be okay for me for the limited use I need. I usually ski at Snow Summit in California which is mostly groomed runs. I've also read that it can be hard to carve on these boards, which would be what I need to do on blue runs. Any advise?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
Go on here and find your board size. Snowboard Sizing Guide, Size Calculator

Then go on Craigslist and find a used girls board in your range. Don't worry about the banana, reverse camber jargon. Most any board made in the last 10-15 years will meet your needs fine, you just need the right size. Then get GOOD BOOTS that FIT. Get bindings with a Toe Cap, but that's not as important as good boots that fit, (no movement in those boots and make sure they are tight when you buy them because they pack out.)

Then take lessons from a professional at the mountain, not a friend that is good at snowboarding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I've already been to that site. I have my board size, have great boots and bindings, just was wondering about this flat rocker board that the pro shop said I should get. Any thoughts? Rocker or regular camber board since I just want to go down the mountain at an easy slow pace.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,213 Posts
The base material (sintered over extruded), stiffness (stiffer = faster), and length (longer = faster) affect the board's speed more than camber profiles.

If you want a board for general cruising, you want a softer board. I would look at boards in the 4-6 range of stiffness on a 10 scale.

I actually think a rocker board or some sort of hybrid will be better for your purposes. The reason being that rockered boards are more forgiving. This means you have less chance of catching edges which is great for general green cruising. If you so do feel inclined to become a good carver, then a flat camber or regular camber will be the best route. A hybrid will give you the best of both worlds.

This one is not a big deal, but a directional or directional twin will be a good choice for you. True twins will work too, but since you don't sound like you'll be doing switch or tricks, directional boards will carve better (for the most part).

I highly recommend the Ride Promise. It's a great female all-mountain board with slightly more than mid-flex. It has a very mellow LowRize rocker which gives you that catch-free playfulness without being too loose. The flex is perfect for your type of riding.

Dunno if this is your size, but take a look.
Ride Promise Womens Snowboard 2011

The GNU B-Street is another good choice. This one is a twin, but carves nicely because of the Magnetraction. The biggest benefit of Magnetraction is icey conditions. It will carve on ice without a problem.
Gnu B-Street BTX Womens Snowboard 2011
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
If you are a 50 year old female just learning to snowboard you kick ass and will not be satisfied with cruising green/blue groomers for long. :D Go for it!:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Camber boards hold an edge better for carving on groomers. Rocker boards float better on powder. Hybrid (e.g., rocker-camber) boards are more forgiving and as someone else already said, are less likely to catch an edge and send you to the ground. Hybrids also have easier turn initiation and float pretty damn well on powder, so I think they're the best of both worlds.

I've never ridden a flat rocker board. Is it a Ride brand board the salesman was suggesting?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
We didn't get into brand names with the sales guy.

Since the mountain is mostly groomed hard packed icy runs which melt and get slushy by mid morning, sounds like the flat rocker would not be good unless I started the day when the snow is slushy. I want something good on the hard packed icy runs as we usually get there first thing in the morning before a lot of people show up.

If the flat rocker does not carve well, I don't understand why the sales guys was trying to talk me into it. For just cruising down the mountain on blue runs, no air, no jumps, sounds like the flat rocker should not be considered and I should get a camber - but even the post above from Leo said the flat rocker would be okay.

See my confusion? Any other comments you guys may have?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
598 Posts
We didn't get into brand names with the sales guy.

Since the mountain is mostly groomed hard packed icy runs which melt and get slushy by mid morning, sounds like the flat rocker would not be good unless I started the day when the snow is slushy. I want something good on the hard packed icy runs as we usually get there first thing in the morning before a lot of people show up.

If the flat rocker does not carve well, I don't understand why the sales guys was trying to talk me into it. For just cruising down the mountain on blue runs, no air, no jumps, sounds like the flat rocker should not be considered and I should get a camber - but even the post above from Leo said the flat rocker would be okay.

See my confusion? Any other comments you guys may have?
The flat rocker will carve fine. Really. The camber will carve better. The distinction being skill and run difficulty. You'll be happy with either board. The flat rocker will be more forgiving if you catch yourself on a rough patch and start to lose your balance. If this happens on a camber board, it doesn't take much to catch an edge and send you to the lodge for the remainder of the day. With a flat rocker, the bevel on the edges help avoid catching an edge...allows you a little bit of wiggle room, if you will. Camber boards are preferred for all mountain riders who like speed. The benefit of camber is that its very stable and stiff at high speeds. Thus more control and quality ride.

If you're looking to do greens and blues, and don't plan on going fast. The board shop guy was right on with what to get. flat rocker will be the best of both worlds. Will get you the forgiveness of rocker with the stability of a flat bottom.

Hope this helped. Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Okay, here is my update. Got the flat rocker board and tried is yesterday morning after a few runs on my original camber board. The first time down was awful, when it is flat on the snow it is really squirrelly and I was having a hard time losing it going from toe edge to back edge - felt like I couldn't dig in on my back edge. After two runs I said I don't think it's for me. My husband got a flat rocker also - still a beginner, and on his second run he LOVED it. He told me to give it a few more runs but I was exhausted by then. I came back to the condo and researched online some more and then this morning tried it again with my mind set that it will be best for me in the long run and to "suck it up". Once I got used to the squirrelly feeling when it is flat and that you have to lean more in the turns, I have decided that I love the board. After two hours I have done the best I'd done yet on my run down the mountain. I went the fastest I've gone yet and was passing everyone on the run. I was able to do front edge to back edge all the way down the mountain! woo hoo! I'm sold - I think all beginners should learn on this board. I could totally feel on this board where it would have caught an edge on the camber board but this board was able to continue just as the ads say. I can't wait to go back tomorrow morning! Thanks for your post Nefarious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
I'm a 50 year old female just learning to snowboard. Can only handle about 2 hours each time before it kicks my butt. I'm not planning on doing any jumps, boxes, rails, etc. I just want a board to go down the mountain on. I am on green runs and would like to get to blue runs - not interested in diamond or black runs. Just want to easily cruise down the hill with some s curves and linking turns. The guy at the pro shop suggested I get a flat rocker board (not a banana board). But some internet reading suggests that's more for doing jumps, etc. so I am confused. Would a 0 degree rocker board be okay for me for the limited use I need. I usually ski at Snow Summit in California which is mostly groomed runs. I've also read that it can be hard to carve on these boards, which would be what I need to do on blue runs. Any advise?
Board with skiing eh? Same boat here. At 39, decided to take it up. Don't know about the board, really, I think there is ALOT of bad advice out there. My advice would be to read, read ask questions then read some more.

Boots seem to be more important than the board honestly. At least it was for me. I've ridden so many different boards and binding setups when I first started and the biggest difference comes with a comfortable pair of boots. If my feet hurt I'm not riding right. I'm also thinking about getting a helmet.

I did something pretty stupid last week. I saw a big jump and decide to ride over it to get a feel for it, gaining speed after each run till I caught air more and more. On my first run, I didn't realize there was a gap between the jump lol. I tried to abort the mission , caught an edge, flew over the jump and landed in the middle on my head. Scrambled my brains a bit. Scrambled my brains a bit. Did I mention I scrambled my brains a bit? I think I should mention that I might be getting a helmet because I scrambled my brains a bit.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top