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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I have done a fair bit of research on the internet, including this site, but I still have massive confusion about board selection. I went to the local shop today, but of course they only had a limited number of boards and a million skiis. I've been boarding for probably about 4 years now, mostly self taught. Every year I board probably 20ish times and I think I can safely fall into the intermediate category... maybe even advanced in some conditions?. I ride a vast array of conditions, mostly being hardpack groomed stuff and small terrain parks - just because thats the way CT and MA boarding is for the first month or so. However, I do travel to VT, NH, and ME regularly so I do experience powder, bigger mountains, and woods/glade runs. Often times I like to bomb the runs. Currently I have a Ride Agenda - 161cm Wide. Its been my first and only board so I dont have much to compare to.

Given my style of riding and conditions I believe I am looking for an all mountain board. I think I would like something equal to or a little more stiff than my current setup (at high speeds I feel like it is too shaky and cant carve too well - maybe thats just the twin hybrid rocker style?). I would also like a little more pop out of my board. Like I said, I'm lost with all the styles and cross styles of snowboards so any friendly advice would be much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I should add that I mainly ride normal, although I like the ability to ride goofy and therefore would probably want a board that rides just as good this way. Also, I dont mind a little extra maintenance on the board so a sintered base would be preferred. As far as parks are concerned, I'm a complete noob. I hit kickers and boxes. So I wouldnt mind if the board favored free ride, groomed trails, etc a little bit over parks. I'd rather not mess up this new board learning rains and such
 

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First, check out the many threads here on boot sizing and make sure you're actually a size 11. It's likely that you can get into smaller sized boots. My foot measures 28cm which equates to a US size 10, which is great because I don't have to get a wide board if I don't want to. Wiredsport will probably chime in at some point with instructions on how to measure your feet.

Second, I can narrow down the field for you a bit. As an intermediate board I'd go with a camber dominant board (camber or camrock/RCR) because that will help you progress faster than an rocker or flat-to-rocker board. You'll feel more locked in on carves than you do with your current board, and you'll get more pop out of it.

Also, since if you're a park newb and favor freeride a directional twin would be a good fit. You'll still be able to do park things and ride switch, but the slight directional shape and flex will make the board more versatile for you.

So check out perennial favorites like the Jones Mountain Twin, Rome National, Yes Standard, Capita Mercury, and Burton Custom.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Drblast, thanks for all the info. Your suggestions are clear and make alot of sense. I just checked my boot and turns out its a size 12. Ill have to read up on boot sizing like you mentioned, but I doubt Ill be able to drop two sizes off of what I have. Is there a set boot size that requires a wide board? Like will a 10 fit a regular board but an 11 requires wide?
 

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Drblast, thanks for all the info. Your suggestions are clear and make alot of sense. I just checked my boot and turns out its a size 12. Ill have to read up on boot sizing like you mentioned, but I doubt Ill be able to drop two sizes off of what I have. Is there a set boot size that requires a wide board? Like will a 10 fit a regular board but an 11 requires wide?
It differs from board to board, which is why it's important to get the boot sizing right especially if you might be right on the edge of needing a wide (longer boards generally have a wider waist which will support bigger feet without necessarily needing a "wide", but in general, size 12 will probably be a wide).
 

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You definitely want to get this right so you don't get a board that's too wide or narrow.

Please measure your foot using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
 

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Drblast, thanks for all the info. Your suggestions are clear and make alot of sense. I just checked my boot and turns out its a size 12. Ill have to read up on boot sizing like you mentioned, but I doubt Ill be able to drop two sizes off of what I have. Is there a set boot size that requires a wide board? Like will a 10 fit a regular board but an 11 requires wide?
The industry wants us to believe the 11 is the size that needs wide, but there are other factors to consider like if your boots have a reduced foot print and if your bindings have toe ramps or a high base for a few examples. And then binding angles and stance width also play a role.
And you may be surprised after following Wired's err Dr.Blasts advice how small you a snowboard boot you can fit into.
 

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With size US12 you will need a wide.
Size US11 is borderline. You will boot out; but if you have high angles, a wide-ish board, and control how deep you carve, then you can make it work if you realize you won't be able to go all Korua Yearning for Turning on it.
 

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Hi All,

I have done a fair bit of research on the internet, including this site, but I still have massive confusion about board selection. I went to the local shop today, but of course they only had a limited number of boards and a million skiis. I've been boarding for probably about 4 years now, mostly self taught. Every year I board probably 20ish times and I think I can safely fall into the intermediate category... maybe even advanced in some conditions?. I ride a vast array of conditions, mostly being hardpack groomed stuff and small terrain parks - just because thats the way CT and MA boarding is for the first month or so. However, I do travel to VT, NH, and ME regularly so I do experience powder, bigger mountains, and woods/glade runs. Often times I like to bomb the runs. Currently I have a Ride Agenda - 161cm Wide. Its been my first and only board so I dont have much to compare to.

Given my style of riding and conditions I believe I am looking for an all mountain board. I think I would like something equal to or a little more stiff than my current setup (at high speeds I feel like it is too shaky and cant carve too well - maybe thats just the twin hybrid rocker style?). I would also like a little more pop out of my board. Like I said, I'm lost with all the styles and cross styles of snowboards so any friendly advice would be much appreciated.
For boards.... I would say Capita DOA, Capita Mercury, Arbor Coda camber, Endeavor BOD, Burton Free Thinker, Yes Greats would be good choices if you want mostly twin-ish boards.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You definitely want to get this right so you don't get a board that's too wide or narrow.

Please measure your foot using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
So I came up with a length (toe to heal) of 27.305cm. and a width (inside to outside of foot) of 9.144cm. From what I've looked up this equates to a 9.5US size. But I know I will not width in a 9.5 boot, my smallest sneaker is is a 10.5 because that brand runs a little large.
 

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So I came up with a length (toe to heal) of 27.305cm. and a width (inside to outside of foot) of 9.144cm. From what I've looked up this equates to a 9.5US size. But I know I will not width in a 9.5 boot, my smallest sneaker is is a 10.5 because that brand runs a little large.
I'm 27.7cm long and 10.4cm wide. I make a size 9 Ride Fuse work with a 9.5 liner in it. I should be in a 10, and I wear an 11 shoe.

Double check those measurements, and then try on a minimum of 5 pairs of boots in a 9.5.

As for boards I'd probably stick in the 160 realm, in those small terrain parks are you riding many rails, or typically more jumps? Much switch riding?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I actually found a shop about 45 minutes away that claims to be "one of the top ranked bootfitters in America". I'll probably swing through there next week to get their opinion and try on a bunch of boots. As far as the parks are concerned, right now I'm only hitting boxes, smaller rails, and small jumps. However, I would like this board to be decent in the parks because thats one of my main focuses this year. I'd like to be able to hit good sized jumps, bigger rails, and learn some more advanced butter tricks.
 
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