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Cool, I will take a look. In general though, you put it outside of the liner right?
Footbeds/tongue shims generally inside the liner.
Almost everything else (J bars/c bars/butterflies/other heel hold aides, foam padding, etc) generally outside the liner.
Heel wedges/cups are case-by-case ( often inside the liner but it depends - eg wedges/heel lifts generally go outside).
 

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He was just getting the minimum 10 characters to post.


Yes.
Footbeds/tongue shims generally inside the liner.
Almost everything else (J bars/c bars/butterflies/other heel hold aides, foam padding, etc) generally outside the liner.
Heel wedges/cups are case-by-case ( often inside the liner but it depends - eg wedges/heel lifts generally go outside).
10 character minimum for a post!!! >:)

Tognar.com
Alright, I'll try what I have right now, and likely pick up something from Tognars.
 

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Thanks @wrathfuldeity for the insightful thread. After being fitted by Wiredsport on his thread, my only option for my wide foot was a snowboarding boot half a size bigger, I have already gotten some Surefeet insoles. So, after two days riding in my boots I'm experiencing heel lift, I'll definitely get started in that. Should I start now before my boot actually packs out or start with the butterfly adjustments then c and j bars?

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Discussion Starter #65
Thanks @wrathfuldeity for the insightful thread. After being fitted by Wiredsport on his thread, my only option for my wide foot was a snowboarding boot half a size bigger, I have already gotten some Surefeet insoles. So, after two days riding in my boots I'm experiencing heel lift, I'll definitely get started in that. Should I start now before my boot actually packs out or start with the butterfly adjustments then c and j bars?

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WinterLion...ru the one that bought 32 lashed boots and your one foot is 1/2 size smaller?...If not, what do you got?
 

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WinterLion...ru the one that bought 32 lashed boots and your one foot is 1/2 size smaller?...If not, what do you got?
No, from wired's thread I got the Salomon Dialogue Wide Men's Size 7 because they don't sell 6.5 in men's. I believe that according to my measurements this means I'm a little more than a "C" wide in women's but just under the men's...

My measurements are:
Left foot: 24. 3 cm Length/9.646 inches
9.2 cm width/3.622 inches

Right foot: 24.5cm/9.843 Length
9.4 cm/3.701 inches


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Discussion Starter #67
winter-lion...well to me the numbers don't mean much but to get you in the ballpark. Hopefully you have gotten to try on the dialogues.

ime, as long as your foot is not getting severely pinched width wise or toes...length wise, you are good...so as you are able to wiggle the tootsies. But the arch/instep thing is more of the issue; in part due to support of the arch (thus the aftermarket insoles that fit your arch) and the insoles help to keep your foot planted inside your boot/liner. I have 32 focus boas and can/do leave the tension fairly loose and at times even unlatched in the foot/lower boa. The lower boa is just to hold your foot in place with enough pressure to keep your foot planted on the insole...it does NOT take that much pressure...And in fact if you are crank it too much you will definitely get pain, numb feet and feel like your foot is getting crushed...because it is.

However, as for the inner lace that holds the ankle and heel in the heel pocket...that is locked down...about as tight as I can pull it. This inner lace is what holds the foot back and locks down the ankle...so that there is very little/no heel lift. You will see in some of my responses...the reference to using "butterfly" wraps...the reason, is the butterfly actually creates a deeper heel pocket and has the potential to mould around the back of the ankle above the heel (skinny part)...and thus help to lock down the heel...due to the creation of the deeper heel pocket.

As for the cuff, i.e., the upper boa...that is snugged down pretty firmly...because the cuff area of the boot/leg is what gives you the leverage to engage your edges. If you have too much slop in the cuff you can't get the power, leverage or support of driving your knees and thus pressuring the edges of the board. This is also where adding some foam to the outside of the liner on the tongue...this will help to push the heel back into the heel pocket and give you a bit of extra padding on the shin...so that you can really cinch the inner laces.

ime, the above works for me. But also ANTICIPATE that you will have some packing out...so when the packing out occures then you will feel it and adjust/add more foam as needed. Again at some point...the packing out will stop (at least in my case with 32 intuition liners) and hopefully you will have made the adjustments/modifications so that they will fit like slippers for years...until the boot shell gives out. Right now on my white 32 focus boas...iirc have 5-6 seasons = maybe 125 days and probably next year...this summer will looking to replace das boots
 

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What is a good brand of boot to get? I Nearest boot fitter is 3 hours from me. My goal right now is to get a good brand of boot and mess with it from there. I was looking at a pair of DC boots?
 

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What is a good brand of boot to get? I Nearest boot fitter is 3 hours from me. My goal right now is to get a good brand of boot and mess with it from there. I was looking at a pair of DC boots?
There's a lot of good brands but they all fit a little different. The best brand for you is the one that fits. If you haven't already, measure your feet and work out exactly what size you need and go from there.
 

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BA has kicked up an excellent series on boot fitting. Go watch it even if you dont think you have boot issues...its pure gold, straight from the leppercon himself.
THANKS @BurtonAvenger

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QaWEpvPSess#
You mean Cenacorn sir.
I wuz wunderin' why there wasn't more (any?) buzz surrounding BA's new boot fitting video series around here...? (I only just discovered & binge watched it myself a couple days ago.) ;) :D

As wrath mentioned,.. some pure gold in that series. I'm planning on saving a little of my disability payments to join the pay wall. (...looking forward to the monthly stickers!) :laugh: :cheer:
 

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Hello,

I'm new to snowboarding, currently having indoor lessons in the UK and in the process of booking a trip for next Jan/Feb. Based on my experience of hire boots at my UK lessons I'm keen to get hold of my own boots before going.

I measure 29.8 cm heel to toe and standard width (can't remember the measurement) but I never need wide for football boots, golf shoes etc. and I know I generally have a narrow heel.

I have a friend who went and bought everything new for his first trip last winter and after four days he quit and spent the rest of his holiday in the bar. He's offered me his 2018 Salomon Launch BOA SJ (2018) for a bargain price of £45 and they look unused to the eye.

They are size UK 12 (31.0) which is a full size larger than my measurement (I've read all I can about fitting on this forum) but I've tried them on a few times over the past week and walked round the house up to an hour at a time. My toes are just about touching the liner front and I have plenty of wriggle room with no noticeable heel lift when trying to simulate turns.

Now on to the point of my post - are Salomon boots known to come up small? I've put my foot over the standard insole and it doesn't seem like I have 1 cm of space past my toes.

Would his four days of falling over have packed them out much? How much packing out can I expect in a week of riding - although they feel fine now I don't want them to be huge.

I know the ultimate answer is get fitted for new boots, and I probably will if I like this trip and plan another.

Thanks
 

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I was told the best boots are the ones that fit your feet and have found that to be good advice for 20 years, regardless of the brand. A professional boot fitter is worth their weight I have found although all boots pack out and die eventually. Joeysmyoko helped me last year and sold me a pair of Strapins which also made a big difference to my heel lift and response.
 

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I was told the best boots are the ones that fit your feet and have found that to be good advice for 20 years, regardless of the brand. A professional boot fitter is worth their weight I have found although all boots pack out and die eventually. Joeysmyoko helped me last year and sold me a pair of Strapins which also made a big difference to my heel lift and response.
If power straps such as Strapins make a big difference for heel hold, your boots do not fit well or your boots are almost certainly too large.
 

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Understand that ALL boots pack out and eventually you will have heel lift, especially in your back foot if you do a lot of tree riding in powder. This includes high-end boots that were perfect and fitted by a professional boot fitter and less than a season old and I have had many such boots over the years.
They definitely help with heel lift, but I didn't buy them for that purpose. I bought them for backcountry insurance but found they are worth keeping on everywhere. Or just buy a new pair of boots every year if you like.
 

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Understand that ALL boots pack out and eventually you will have heel lift, especially in your back foot if you do a lot of tree riding in powder. This includes high-end boots that were perfect and fitted by a professional boot fitter and less than a season old and I have had many such boots over the years.

They definitely help with heel lift, but I didn't buy them for that purpose. I bought them for backcountry insurance but found they are worth keeping on everywhere. Or just buy a new pair of boots every year if you like.


The point is to buy boots to fit your foot AFTER they pack out.


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Have been reading a lot of great advice on this forum, so throwing my situation out there for help: I have small hobbit feet: 25.5cm with max width 9.5cm about where the forefoot meets the mid-foot. Based on my research, that lines up with size 8 in regular width. However, when I’ve boot shopped in the past, even a size 9 tends to feels like a boa constrictor on my foot, so I tend to size up. I typically wear a 9 dress shoe due to what I perceive is a fairly narrow heal, but 9.5 or even 10 in atheletic shoes to get a comfortable fit. I don’t believe I have a severely high arch, but the top of my foot is high and boney.

Long story short, both pairs of boots i’ve owned have killed the top of my back foot. The Burtons I had caused enough of an issue I sometimes struggled to ride back to back days. I upgraded to some Rides a few seasons back, and they are better, but by afternoon the pain shows up and gets a little worse with each lap. Everything else feels fine, top of the foot pressure point is the only issue.

Other background is I play hockey and I like to put my boots on like a skate - very snug and secure for max control. I’m wondering if I’m buying a boot that’s too big based on comfort standing in the shop and tieing them so damn tight I’m self-inflicting the pain. Is the solution to get used to a smaller boot that’s not tied as tightly?

Looking a new dual-BOAs for an upcoming trip. Really don’t want to spend that $$$ on another pair of painful boots. Thanks a ton to anyone who can help.
 
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