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Have been reading a lot of great advice on this forum, so throwing my situation out there for help: I have small hobbit feet: 25.5cm with max width 9.5cm about where the forefoot meets the mid-foot. Based on my research, that lines up with size 8 in regular width.
Hi Bill,

25.5 is Mondopoint 255 or size 7.5 US in snowboard boots. 9.5 is E width and would require a specific Wide boot. Before we get there, please post up images of your bare foot while taking the measurements below.


Please measure your foot using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.


STOKED!
 

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Kenai whilst a well-fitting boot may remain comfortable for years, it will start to pack out quickly and I have found a distinct difference in less than a week power, control and response wise....with high-end well-fitted boots of all descriptions.
When it happens (not if) this WILL lead to slower transitions and less response in your turns with absolute certainty but people just adapt and think that is normal. It does not need to be is my point.
A well-fitted boot is crucial, just don't expect it to last for long in the same condition you purchased it as there will be a lag when you lean into a transition. A strap of any description you can actually lever fixes that response time. Don't believe me, try it and see.
 

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I was told the best boots are the ones that fit your feet and have found that to be good advice for 20 years, regardless of the brand. A professional boot fitter is worth their weight I have found although all boots pack out and die eventually. Joeysmyoko helped me last year and sold me a pair of Strapins which also made a big difference to my heel lift and response.
Hi Myoko,

Have you taken your barefoot measurements yourself as a reference? If not, that would be a great idea.

Please measure your foot using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
 

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Hello,

I'm new to snowboarding, currently having indoor lessons in the UK and in the process of booking a trip for next Jan/Feb. Based on my experience of hire boots at my UK lessons I'm keen to get hold of my own boots before going.

I measure 29.8 cm heel to toe and standard width (can't remember the measurement) but I never need wide for football boots, golf shoes etc. and I know I generally have a narrow heel.

I have a friend who went and bought everything new for his first trip last winter and after four days he quit and spent the rest of his holiday in the bar. He's offered me his 2018 Salomon Launch BOA SJ (2018) for a bargain price of £45 and they look unused to the eye.

They are size UK 12 (31.0) which is a full size larger than my measurement (I've read all I can about fitting on this forum) but I've tried them on a few times over the past week and walked round the house up to an hour at a time. My toes are just about touching the liner front and I have plenty of wriggle room with no noticeable heel lift when trying to simulate turns.

Now on to the point of my post - are Salomon boots known to come up small? I've put my foot over the standard insole and it doesn't seem like I have 1 cm of space past my toes.

Would his four days of falling over have packed them out much? How much packing out can I expect in a week of riding - although they feel fine now I don't want them to be huge.

I know the ultimate answer is get fitted for new boots, and I probably will if I like this trip and plan another.

Thanks
Hi Qwerty,
Yes, Mondo 310 will be a full size to large for your measurements posted above. Please let us know your width measurements as well. In regards to the insert, you ill not have 1 cm of insert past your foot. Your foot will overhang the insert by ~1 cm.
 

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Have been reading a lot of great advice on this forum, so throwing my situation out there for help: I have small hobbit feet: 25.5cm with max width 9.5cm about where the forefoot meets the mid-foot. Based on my research, that lines up with size 8 in regular width.

25.5 is Mondopoint 255 or size 7.5 US in snowboard boots. 9.5 is E width and would require a specific Wide boot. Before we get there, please post up images of your bare foot while taking the measurements below.


Thanks, Wired.

Snapped these photos earlier roughly confirming the original measurements. (Pardon my abused paws).

Thinking I’ll try to find a shop that carries ThirtyTwos which I have read are higher volume/slightly wider on average. Maybe Nidecker (Flow) as well. Would appreciate your take on where I should start.

Much appreciated!
 

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25.5 is Mondopoint 255 or size 7.5 US in snowboard boots. 9.5 is E width and would require a specific Wide boot. Before we get there, please post up images of your bare foot while taking the measurements below.


Thanks, Wired.

Snapped these photos earlier roughly confirming the original measurements. (Pardon my abused paws).

Thinking I’ll try to find a shop that carries ThirtyTwos which I have read are higher volume/slightly wider on average. Maybe Nidecker (Flow) as well. Would appreciate your take on where I should start.

Much appreciated!

Hi Bill,

I am not finding your images. Please repost those. Neither of the boots you mentioned would be suggested for E width. Only Salomon produces for E width (only their Wide Models). Before we get there we should confirm your measurements with images.

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Hello Wiredsport,

Appreciate the advice re measuring foot, I have bought enough shoes and made enough mistakes over the years so now go 100% on feel. What actually fits my foot, length, width and stiffness. Toes needing to touch the edge uncomfortably and then they will eventually get better after a lot of pain in just a dumb plan, going through pain to break a boot in is simply not necessary in my view.

I have yet to buy the boot I had researched and actually wanted though to be honest as I always end up with whatever boot fits my foot the best. But get a good boot fitter and give yourself lots of time to try on boots, both are worth making the effort to find I believe. Works for me anyway :)
 

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Hello Wiredsport,

Appreciate the advice re measuring foot, I have bought enough shoes and made enough mistakes over the years so now go 100% on feel. What actually fits my foot, length, width and stiffness. Toes needing to touch the edge uncomfortably and then they will eventually get better after a lot of pain in just a dumb plan, going through pain to break a boot in is simply not necessary in my view.

I have yet to buy the boot I had researched and actually wanted though to be honest as I always end up with whatever boot fits my foot the best. But get a good boot fitter and give yourself lots of time to try on boots, both are worth making the effort to find I believe. Works for me anyway :)
Hi Myoko,

If you ever want to check your fit we can do that with ease. What you wrote about boots going south for you that quickly is quite common when riders are buying larger than Mondopoint. You may have it just right, but it is always worth the 2 minutes it takes to check. We are here if you would like to see. STOKED!
 

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Must admit I have never heard of Mondopoint. I did the measurements and I am 27.5cm by 10.5cm and I always end up in a size US10 or size US10.5 boot as boots tend to vary with different manufacturers. I'd rather a 10 so I can use medium bindings. I'm pretty anal about making sure my toes are not in pain and my heel feels firm and I tend to get stiff boots without much give if possible.
 

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Must admit I have never heard of Mondopoint. I did the measurements and I am 27.5cm by 10.5cm and I always end up in a size US10 or size US10.5 boot as boots tend to vary with different manufacturers. I'd rather a 10 so I can use medium bindings. I'm pretty anal about making sure my toes are not in pain and my heel feels firm and I tend to get stiff boots without much give if possible.
Hi Myoko,

27.5 cm is Mondopoint 275 or size 9.5 US in snowboard boots. I would strongly suggest that you also measure your barefoot width (directions above). Thanks
 

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Toes needing to touch the edge uncomfortably and then they will eventually get better after a lot of pain in just a dumb plan, going through pain to break a boot in is simply not necessary in my view.
It is inevitable that liners will break in. They loose volume. That's how liners are. Thus... you have two choices: buy too large boots to circumvent the break in "pain" and end up with a too large, no heel hold, non-responsive boot as soon as liners broke in and then try to tinker the lost heel hold by using jbars, add insoles with footbed to avoid slipping around in the now too big boot.

Or: buy a correctly sized boot which indeed is uncomfy the first days, but will fit once broken in.

I (and a ton of other ppl here) have been in the first group many years (in my case 15 years). With all the tinkering and lost response and heel lift and cranking down ratchets n overtightening to compensate for lost response swimming in too big boots which were "comfy" "fitting" when buying.

And since this was continuously miserable, I dared the experiment and believed Wired (of course after the same arguing; BTW: I'm surprized he has the patience to go through those arguments again and again with all the ppl here) and sized down. And see? After initial two-three uncomfortable days when boots were too narrow around heel or too short around toes? They broke in and THEN fitted perfectly for the next 80 days.

Of cours, simply choosing the right size won't guarantee that the boot fits. Width, heel, and arch height need to fit, too. But once you find that model in the correct size? Life will get easier.

The other thing is response... every boot will get softer by time. This as well is inevitable. Thus buy the boot stiffer than you want them in the end. If you really really want a very stiff boot, check 32 Jones MTB (iirc you do BC riding, right?). That's as stiff as one can go. But be prepared to go through some initial uncomfortable days cos it will be uncomfortably stiff at the beginning until it breaks in. Then it becomes just very stiff :). (Whereas Deeluxe XV went from stiff to mid-stiff with use).

Good luck! :)
 

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That was my barefoot dimensions. 27.5cm by 10.5cm ....probably closer to 28cm. I see where 28 is US10 and 27.5 is US9.5.

Nahhh i don't subscribe to the buying too small as I have had boots that crushed my toes for months until I took them to someone that extended them perhaps less than .5cm. I actually discussed this with a guy today who fixed my back foot boot who is a professional boot fitter and he had the same opinion. Mind you, he also sold me the boot originally :) Depends on the boot also I imagine
 

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@Myoko, Check out Angrysnowboarder.com for their "Boot Fitting 101" series.

What you're describing with the "toes" jammed uncomfortably into the end of the boot? That's what AS describes as a "Performance fit!"

That fit is not recommended for the majority of ppl buying boots. That type fit is only for the hard core shredder looking for a super responsive fit that won't pack out in 20 days. :shrug:

A regular fit is where the toes just touch the tip of the boot liner while standing up straight. With knees bent in a riding stance, your toes will/should pull back slightly.
 
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!00% agree chomps. I think what people don't reflect on is at the top of the boot when it starts to pack out. When you lean into your turn your response time between transitions is much slower and many are unaware of it/put up with it when it can be fixed quite easily.
 

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That was my barefoot dimensions. 27.5cm by 10.5cm ....probably closer to 28cm. I see where 28 is US10 and 27.5 is US9.5.

Nahhh i don't subscribe to the buying too small as I have had boots that crushed my toes for months until I took them to someone that extended them perhaps less than .5cm. I actually discussed this with a guy today who fixed my back foot boot who is a professional boot fitter and he had the same opinion. Mind you, he also sold me the boot originally :) Depends on the boot also I imagine
Hi Myoko,

I see your issue. 10.5 cm wide is an EE width at 27.5 cm. This will never work well in "normal" width snowboard boots which are D width. Essentially your Boot is too long but not wide enough. This is extremely common. If you try on your correct Mondopoint length it Feels too short. This is because the toe box is not wide enough. The arc of the toebox is designed for D width feet so your EE width feet are too long at the outsize of the arc. Your fitter and boot fitter should have picked up on this. Sadly this gets missed all the time.

If you post up images of your barefoot length and width measurements being taken I can correct this for you. This problem always leads to boots becoming essentially useless after pack in. It becomes a very expensive habit to try to keep buying boots that are really only in usable condition for two weeks :).
 

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@Myoko, Check out Angrysnowboarder.com for their "Boot Fitting 101" series.

What you're describing with the "toes" jammed uncomfortably into the end of the boot? That's what AS describes as a "Performance fit!"

That fit is not recommended for the majority of ppl buying boots. That type fit is only for the hard core shredder looking for a super responsive fit that won't pack out in 20 days. :shrug:

A regular fit is where the toes just touch the tip of the boot liner while standing up straight. With knees bent in a riding stance, your toes will/should pull back slightly.
Hi Chomps,

This is part correct. A performance fit is when riders are going smaller than their Mondopoint range (which is .5 cm). When you are within the .5 cm of your Mondopoint range you are in your standard suggested fit. This is still how every snowboard boot is designed (it is actually the core principle of the Mondopoint standard). This has been our stock suggestion for 25 years. Firm pressure, not just touching is the key:


Your boots should be snug!
The most common complaint about boots is that they are too loose, not too tight. The junction between rider and board begins with the boot, as it is in the most direct contact with the rider. When fitting boots, use the following method: A. Slip into the boot. B. Kick your heel back against the ground several times to drive it back into the boot's heel pocket. C. Lace the boot tightly, as though you were going to ride. NOTE: This is where most sizing mistakes are made. A snowboard boot is shaped like an upside down "7". The back has a good degree of forward lean. Thus, when you drop into the boot, your heel may be resting up to an inch away from the back of the boot, and your toes may be jammed into the front of the boot. Until the boot is tightly laced, you will not know if it is a proper fit. D. Your toes should now have firm pressure against the front of the boot. As this is the crux of sizing, let's discuss firm pressure: When you flex your knee forward hard, the pressure should lighten, or cease, as your toes pull back. At no time should you feel numbness or lose circulation. Your toes will be in contact with the end of the boot, unlike in a properly fit street or athletic shoe (snowboard boots are designed to fit more snugly than your other shoes). When you have achieved this combination of firm pressure and no circulation loss, you have found the correct size!
 

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I am new snowboarder starts from this snow season, and I bought a the cheapest Decathlon boots recently. Found a problem, each time when i go snowboarding and put my feet in the boots for just 1 hour, my dogs barking so bad. I was thinking maybe I tied too much tight maybe? But even that tight when I slide down the hill(face towards mountain top) I feel my feet are about to get out from the boots. Shall I change a even smaller boots? Any suggestions will be highly appreciated
 

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I am new snowboarder starts from this snow season, and I bought a the cheapest Decathlon boots recently. Found a problem, each time when i go snowboarding and put my feet in the boots for just 1 hour, my dogs barking so bad. I was thinking maybe I tied too much tight maybe? But even that tight when I slide down the hill(face towards mountain top) I feel my feet are about to get out from the boots. Shall I change a even smaller boots? Any suggestions will be highly appreciated
Please measure your feet using this method:



Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot
 
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