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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So. Er. Background:

Just finished my third season ( a "season" being roughly a week in the alps and a few trips to the local indoor snow dome). First was a week of lessons done with hire gear apart from boots, which I bought half way though because it was the end of the season and the ones from the hire shop were seriously grim.

Second season, I took my own gear - Salomon Sight 155W, Flow Fuse bindings, all sale purchases, and spent the week on blues and some fairly steep reds, still catching plenty of edges.

Third season (after a year's COVID break, like most other people), took the same setup, but with insoles in the boots to try and cure heel lift. Blues and plenty of reds again, plus the odd bit off-piste, though not that much because it was April and the off piste stuff was chopped to hell. No edges caught this time and even the shallow and narrow forest blues didn't present a problem. Had two lessons on the first two days, at which point the instructor told me I didn't need any more, just to go out and practise.

Anyway, got home and went to try new boots and discovered most of my problems were due to the old ones being half a size too big (didn't know any better when I bought them). At the same time, got talked into an ex-demo Burton Custom Camber for £200, on the basis that I spend most of my time on red and blue groomers, happily carving my way to the next coffee stop and also it was a good deal.

But now reading the reviews, I'm worried I've bought something beyond my ability level - what counts as 'intermediate' here? It almost sounds like the custom catches an edge if you even look sideways at it and the chances are I'll only have luggage capacity for one board on the next trip - I don't want to ruin it by taking a board that's going to spend the week punishing me, have I bought the wrong one?
 

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Think of it this way. If you learn on a traditional camber board, such as the Custom.
You will learn, better edge control and a better technique for carving. The more you fall from catching your edge, then you won't want that happening anymore and you will learn from your mistakes, really fast. Learning on a traditional camber board, will make you a much better rider.
 

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Worst case, you just get a rental on your next trip if you can’t handle it. According to EVO.com, the Custom should be similar in flex to your old board if you didn’t size up a lot.
 

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I dont really buy into all of the ‘camber makes you a better rider’ nonsense but regardless of that and either way, it’s just another snowboard and you’ll work out how to ride it in two runs. They don’t catch edges any more than anything else. The board will be fine, you’ll have fun on it, it’s not to advanced for you.
 

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Back in the good old days there was only full camber to start on. We've progressively evolved over time to present where there are now boards with varying specific design characteristics, technical construction and profiles that can individually tailor to meet your terrain, conditions and riding style. So with the Custom your are faced with a carbon enhanced flex of around 7 (Moderate stiff) mated to a full camber profile, directional twin and a WFO full Sintered base. It's an intermediate to advanced level ride mostly suited to AM conditions. Burton have a large number of sizes and widths to this board which allows you find a Custom perfectly suited to your weight and boot size. I've ridden the full cambered Custom over 5 generational evolutions over the decades and will admit I'm truly a fanboy of this board. The Custom is a solid move in the right direction if you want a hard charging mostly do it all AM choice.

I have attached my Custom review below.

 

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I dont really buy into all of the ‘camber makes you a better rider’ nonsense but regardless of that and either way, it’s just another snowboard and you’ll work out how to ride it in two runs. They don’t catch edges any more than anything else. The board will be fine, you’ll have fun on it, it’s not to advanced for you.
ye, it might help at first with not catching edges on old camber boards, but even if i had those boards for everything for years, i felt some real improvement trying other stuff.
 

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ye, it might help at first with not catching edges on old camber boards, but even if i had those boards for everything for years, i felt some real improvement trying other stuff.
Yeah for sure, riding a variety is valuable in improving whether it’s going to camber or away from camber, you’re going to learn more.
 

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£200 seems like a great deal for a tried-and-tested classic.
Sounds like you have made it comfortably past the beginner stage - I’m sure you’ll be fine on the custom. In fact it will probably serve you better for progressing than a more beginner friendly board like the sight.
Maybe book a lesson on your first day back, to set your week off in the right direction after a year away from the mountains?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Cheers for the responses - I was hoping that would be the case, just had a moment of doubt. For reference, I'm 6', size 9.5UK boots (now I've got ones that fit), 80kg and went with a 156 board. The Sight was a 155W.

Everyone I go out on the mountains with are on skis, so I don't have much of a point of reference for these things :)
 
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