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Discussion Starter #1
Im preparing for the season scraping off storage wax, and Im wondering if I can just keep the offscrape wax and reuse it later? Or does the wax loose its qualities after one use?
 

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You could, but it would be "dirty" wax. Wax is cheap...I actually use plain old canning wax or paraffin, 1 pound cost $3.50us...works fine and can hit 60mph. The crayon method of waxing uses very little wax; thus you don't even have to scrape...and a pound would last 5-6 seasons. I also use this paraffin as storage wax...just put on a heavier layer in the spring and just scrape it off in the fall and go.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Can you reuse a condom? Sure, doesn't mean it's a good idea.
I bet someone is regretting not doing just that. Not me though, have to say I agree with the answers here.

It just struck me as a good idea for environmental, economical and practical reasons to sprinkle on flakes of wax and iron it out, so I had to ask if someone does this.
 

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...It just struck me as a good idea for environmental, economical and practical reasons to sprinkle on flakes of wax and iron it out, so I had to ask if someone does this.
Waxing throughout the season using the "crayon" method would give a satisfactory result for any/all of those concerns. Not to mention it's quick & easy as well as effective. :shrug:

I do one, maybe two traditional wax jobs a season on my decks, then keep them tuned & touched up by frequent crayoning. :D
 

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I usually only drip wax on half of the board.
Then scrape the excess to the unwaxed side.

The scraped wax doesn't have any time to get dirty


TT
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I usually only drip wax on half of the board.
Then scrape the excess to the unwaxed side.

The scraped wax doesn't have any time to get dirty


TT
Yeah, most of the scraped wax ends up on the board, so I could easily just sweep it into a plastic bag and not to the floor. But it`s been sitting in my basement for months maybe collecting dust and dirt, so I threw the wax away.

You only wax half the board?
 

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You could, but it would be "dirty" wax. Wax is cheap...I actually use plain old canning wax or paraffin, 1 pound cost $3.50us...works fine and can hit 60mph. The crayon method of waxing uses very little wax; thus you don't even have to scrape...and a pound would last 5-6 seasons. I also use this paraffin as storage wax...just put on a heavier layer in the spring and just scrape it off in the fall and go.
I had considered this in my youth, but I've never tried it. Canning wax has been in my skating kit forever. Paraffin has got to be better for the environment than the fluorinated waxes favored by the industry. And it's so cheap. I'll use it on my pow surfer first. I'm guessing it's softer than traditional wax? Can you apply it at lower heat? At the very least, it seems like a decent storage wax option.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Waxing throughout the season using the "crayon" method would give a satisfactory result for any/all of those concerns. Not to mention it's quick & easy as well as effective. :shrug:

I do one, maybe two traditional wax jobs a season on my decks, then keep them tuned & touched up by frequent crayoning. :D
Yeah I don`t like to wax often, just for maintanance not so much for glide. Would like to try the crayon method, never done that. Do you heat the wax before crayoning, use an iron on the board after or both?
 

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Yeah I don`t like to wax often, just for maintanance not so much for glide. Would like to try the crayon method, never done that. Do you heat the wax before crayoning, use an iron on the board after or both?
crayon...board in position, iron warm and ready; then just briefly touch yer bar of wax to the hot iron, then rub/color/crayon the warm side of briefly warmed wax bar onto the base of the bar...like coloring a piece of paper. After you color the entire base, then with the iron over the base to melt the crayoned wax into the base. Which results in a thin layer of wax that has absorbed into the base. With the thin layer of wax, the first run or two, the board is scraped.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks, gonna try this for glide using the cold temp wax i bought on an outlet. Found it too hard and difficult for "drip waxing", as I want to use as low heat as possible on my board.
 

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Thanks, gonna try this for glide using the cold temp wax i bought on an outlet. Found it too hard and difficult for "drip waxing", as I want to use as low heat as possible on my board.
If the wax is too hard for drip waxing, crayoning won't work and you won't get to iron the wax into the base. Get more ecofriendly wax instead, and with all temp wax you need less heat. Heating up an iron on a wood stove the old way would make more sense than just halfassing the waxjob, if you feel that you have to. Using leftover wax is fine unless it's dirty.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah i also have all temp, but ill give the cold temp one a shot since i already have it. Why would heating the iron over an old wood stove be better than with electricity?
 

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Yeah I don`t like to wax often, just for maintanance not so much for glide. Would like to try the crayon method, never done that. Do you heat the wax before crayoning, use an iron on the board after or both?
crayon...board in position, iron warm and ready; then just briefly touch yer bar of wax to the hot iron, then rub/color/crayon the warm side of briefly warmed wax bar onto the base of the bar...like coloring a piece of paper. After you color the entire base, then with the iron over the base to melt the crayoned wax into the base. Which results in a thin layer of wax that has absorbed into the base. With the thin layer of wax, the first run or two, the board is scraped.
This is what I do far more economical when waxing especially when using low fluro waxes. I save scrapped off wax only when clean when using fluro just to minimize wastage however not much comes off when you chalk on off the iron.
 

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Yeah i also have all temp, but ill give the cold temp one a shot since i already have it. Why would heating the iron over an old wood stove be better than with electricity?
Figured the reason you wanted less heat was to save electricity,:trolls: just find a wax suppliers site and set it accordingly and you're fine.
 

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Yeah i also have all temp, but ill give the cold temp one a shot since i already have it. Why would heating the iron over an old wood stove be better than with electricity?
Cold wax is used when air temperature is too cold for all-temperature wax.

All-temperature wax is good to about 15 deg F (-9 deg C).

Warmer wax is softer, so it needs a lower temperature to melt.
 

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If the wax is too hard for drip waxing, crayoning won't work and you won't get to iron the wax into the base. Get more ecofriendly wax instead, and with all temp wax you need less heat. Heating up an iron on a wood stove the old way would make more sense than just halfassing the waxjob, if you feel that you have to. Using leftover wax is fine unless it's dirty.
The wax I have doesn't drip, however you have to crayon and/or hot-smear it on, then run the iron over it to get the wax into the base.

See: https://youtu.be/4eZ7QmJuX6I?t=371

Figured the reason you wanted less heat was to save electricity,:trolls: just find a wax suppliers site and set it accordingly and you're fine.
I think he's paranoid about damaging the base with excessive heat.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yup, paranoid. The cold temp wax require 150 degrees c it says on the box, The all temp 125. Tried it once and at point the wax melted the topsheet was pretty warm and the inserts were visable though the ptex and it didnt feel good. Was also a pain to scrape of. I feel cold temp wax is for cross country skiing and unneccesary for snowboarding, but ill try crayoning it before giving it to someone, then try paraffin wax next time i guess.
 
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