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I long board mongo pushing with my left foot but i snowboard regular and push with my right. I can scate with either foot forward but i can only push well with my left leg. The funny thing is that i can only snowboard with my left foot forward. Is there any trick to riding switch?
 

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The same steps people take to learn how to link turns are the same you would use to learn switch. People get frustrated and give up on switch because they can just switch back to their comfortable riding position. The trick is to trick yourself into thinking there is no other option and just push through and practice practice practice.
 

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Mounting your bindings the other way can actually be useful if you have a directional board. It will force you to learn all over again. Do everything including the lift switch.

Before you know it you'll be riding either way just fine.**



** If your normal dominate leg has more muscle than your non dominate leg you will probably be missing a little something but no worries. You'll get stronger the more you ride switch.
 

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In a recent thread of 2013 season goals every 2nd poster wanted to get better at switch, me included.

So don't feel bad, and just go for it.
 

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practice > anything else

one good mental trick that has helped me was to think of a new foot forward instead of riding backwards.
 

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I learned to ride switch very early on in my riding. Near the end of my first full season.

I see a lot of people keep mentioning "just practice, or learn it from going back to the basics of learning to ride reg." But if you've been riding for some time, and with what I assume is at least a few years of skate experience? Do you even remember all the drills and practice techniques you had to do when you were first learning to ride? I was so new, I was just barely competent linking turns regular on green & blue runs, when I learned to ride switch. I took a private lesson, from an instructor. Maybe a lesson, from a good instructor, someone who will run you thru all of those, silly, boring, stupid looking drills that a lot of us had to go thru when learning to ride our regular stance, (Be that goofy or reg.) might be beneficial?

If it's been a few years since you were a NooB, and feeling like you already "know" how to ride, it might be tough to recall all those sometimes humiliatingly stoopid looking techniques and drills! I also had the advantage of being new enough to snowboarding that my ego did not suffer a hit by taking instruction or having to go thru learning switch from scratch! In fact, I eventually wound up getting a massive ego boost by having more experienced riders tell me that as new as I was, they were impressed that I could ride switch better than they could! :thumbsup:

It just might help to be reminded of some of those basic techniques for just learning to ride when applying them to your getting proficient riding switch! Maybe? Just a thought.
 

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lot of green runs are in your future. Progress slowly and as mentioned a ton of times it really is like learning to ride all over again.

I sometimes need to mentally tell myself to put more weight on my front foot. When I feel a little sketchy or getting off balance. This was early on and sometimes still happens but now I am very comfortable riding switch.

Just time on the board and going back to the basics
 

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I learned to ride switch very early on in my riding. Near the end of my first full season. . . .
Interesting. I'm a noob, just linking turns. I was definitely planning to take another lesson or two at the beginning of this season. When reading this thread, I was wondering if it might make sense for me to start trying switch sooner rather than later. It does seem like chomps might be on to something here . . .
 

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When I started to learn riding switch, I had serious trouble being able to initiate toe-side turns. I took fall after fall not being able to complete the turn. What helped for me was holding out my arms to both sides, forcing my shoulders to stay aligned with the board while kind of pointing my arm and shoulder in the direction I wanted to go while turning. Not saying this is the best, or the proper way, but atleast it got me started.
(hope my description makes sense)

Also, there is a thread called "Riding switch" at page 2 in the "tips, tricks..." section with more about this subject...
 

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Interesting. I'm a noob, just linking turns. I was definitely planning to take another lesson or two at the beginning of this season. When reading this thread, I was wondering if it might make sense for me to start trying switch sooner rather than later. It does seem like chomps might be on to something here . . .
Absolutely, don't leave it for later
 

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the weight distribution is critical, just like the tendency of a beginner is to get too far back on it and not be able to turn, so does the starting switcher need to commit to that downhill foot. i find it easier to be going a bit faster to get it carving. eventually there is a moment where you arent sure what is backward of forward, you are just riding it. and they are one in the same.

try commiting to full runs switch, even if it takes you an hour to get down, progression maximum

and for yall just starting riding, start switch now, imo, the sooner the better

trade boards with an opposite-footed buddy for a runs, or a day
 

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Interesting. I'm a noob, just linking turns. I was definitely planning to take another lesson or two at the beginning of this season. When reading this thread, I was wondering if it might make sense for me to start trying switch sooner rather than later. It does seem like chomps might be on to something here . . .
+1
Learn it right from the beginning, so you can't develop this feeling of "wrong direction". For me, switch feels very unnatural... body is used to ride solely one direction many years. It's not your head that knows to ride, it's all about muscle memory. I would perfectly know how to ride but struggle to even link two turns with the "wrong" front/hind leg. You'll find me back on a bunny hill (urgh) this season :laugh: hope, the days on a kiteboard riding switch this summer helped to overcome this feeling of wrong :dizzy:
 

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I do various workouts on my Indo board, and one thing I do is just put on some music and ride it for a while like I'm on a snowboard (when I'm lifting weights etc on it, I'm centered and looking ahead, when I'm "riding" on it, I'm looking in one direction and generally putting more weight on my front foot). This can get a bit boring, so I started riding "switch" on it just to spice things up. It felt a bit awkward the first time I did it but that was it. I wonder if "riding switch" on an Indo board would help people who have trouble with it.

Also, people vary in how ambidextrous they are in handedness. I wouldn't be surprised if it's the same with riding switch. It probably comes more easily for some people regardless of how long they've been snowboarding.
 

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everyone is different as we all know.
I'm not to sure I'd be jumping on the switch riding until is reg riding his/your reg riding is on lock. I got the feeling he just started linking turns. For me I had to be very comfortable with my reg riding before I felt I should try switch.
 
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