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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What charateristics make an excellent soft boot carving board?

Optimal sidecut radius for small, medium (my preferred) or large turns? Board width (I have a size 9 boot)? Soft flexible middle vs stiff middle? What makes a carving board forgiving (my preferred) vs hard charging? How does board taper affect carving turns? Setback or twin? Magnetraction edges vs straight? Is there something beneficial to asymmetrical shapes?

Looking for a groomer carving board (70% daily driver) for all conditions (soft, ice, corn) whenever there's no fresh snow.

Some boards that I'm looking at:

Korua Cafe Racer
Nidecker Tracer
Telos Back/Slash
United Shapes Orbit

How are these boards similar, yet different?

Thanks, as always, for your insight.
 

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Having camber, long effective edge, medium stiff with some torsional flex between the feet. As far as the sidecut radius goes, I found boards with 8 m radius and up are better for long drawn out arcs and have better flow in the turns.
 

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It really depends on your riding style, terrain, and personal preferences. I've found the only rules for me are I like the board to be on the stiffer end and mostly camber.

First choice is duck vs. +/+, with double positive making getting low and having proper body position easier. But if you aspire to be Ryan Knapton duck can work.

Camber and long effective edge makes this easier, so does setback and taper. But a little goes a long way. I love carving on my twins with 2-4cm of setback. That feels great.

If you have room (wide uncrowded groomers) riding a much longer board than normal is amazing for carving. Check out the hardboot GS boards and see how they're designed. There's a reason they look like that. You can try to emulate that style to a lesser extent in soft boots with very aggressive double positive angles and a long board.

Or check it Kijima's carving thread and look at the short/fat board approach. The Korua yearning for turning video series is more that very dynamic style instead of long drawn out carves.

Finally, it's tempting to think an 8m sidecut will make 8m circles in the snow but boards don't ride like that. The sidecut has more to do with how far the center of the board will flex once you get up on edge before it hits the ground. The deeper the sidecut, the more room it has to flex, and the tighter turn you'll make, but board flex and camber profile comes into play a lot here too. The sidecut interacts with those things to determine how a board rides.

It's tempting to go after a certain set of specs but really only riding boards will tell you what you like.
 

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while carving you put the board on edge and load the board at the same time. your goal is to ride with an optimal angle and optimal pressure.
during the turn both parameters change, and different parts of the board experience different load. usually nose works in the beginning of the turn, at this stage the forces are minimal, then, while you accelerate through the turn, the pressure rises and rider uses mid board and the tail section to finish the arc. It is like you start your turn on one board and finish on another. the change is quite linear. carvers move actively above the board not every movement should be passed into the board.
Camber - you need consistent and predictable board behaviour and some force to jump into the next turn, rockered boards change their behaviour during the turn, camber works better.
Flex - you need a softer nose and stiffer tail, torsional stiffness should increase towards the tail and be present in the middle, otherwise the board would twist and you’ll loose the edge angle, unless you re super aware of your balance and weight distribution, during the whole weighting, angulation, inclination, rotation routine
Radius - smaller radius means smaller turns, better skills require larger radius, proper carving wether race or eur is extremely dizzy on boards with small radius.
Edge tech - carver needs straight edge and maximum contact, i.e. no edge tech other than sharp edge.
Titanal - less vibrations.
Carbon - torsional stiffness, vibrations
Width - no overhang
 

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Most if not all of my seven board quiver are carving boards. They're all different from each other. There's twins, pintails, and swallowtails from 150 up to 166. Conditions and my mood dictate which I grab on any given day. Icy days get the longer effective edges while softer days get shorter boards.

All of these boards are camber or flat profiles without magnetraction of any kind. I like enough torsional flex to bend the board into different turn shapes as well.

Do you ride duck stance or ++? I prefer ++ for carving by a large margin. The width of the board kinda dictates where I put my toes and heels for power distribution and boot-out reduction. My angles get steeper as my boards get longer and narrower. I've been riding my Pentaquark at angles up to 51,39, but relax that quite a bit on my wider boards.
 

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carving is a skill and you can carve on any board. carving on soft cambered twins is beneficial for the balance, you can’t carve fast and should constantly adjust your balance and pressure
carving on stiff boards with large radius allows you to focus on a few critically important movements, and you have to ride fast.
easiest boards to start carving in duck stance are short fats with slightly directional flex and small radius, however if you are good you might outgrow it pretty fast, in a couple of days.
 

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Almost all boards are carving boards. I how you’re supposed to ride a snowboard. Most people just don’t carve. Camber dominant twin is way to go for a daily, assuming you ride the entire mountain. I don’t view Koruas/Nidedkers or anything in that vein as a “daily”. Unless all you do is carve something more traditional is a better bet. My choice is a Tom Sims Pro. However it’s not very snappy and therefore boring in the park/side hits. So I’ll likely look to replace it in a season or two.
 

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@garikgarik damnit, beat me by literal seconds.
Yep, “carving boards” is a construct mostly. Any snowboard with sidecut can carve.
people tend to forget that so called carving boards i.e. progressively stiff longitudinally, stiff torsionally, with a large(over 10metres) sidecut radius are designed for very particular style of riding, and are demanding.
However camber and slightly directional flex do help. Most Koruas and Nideckers are usual freeride boards, except for bullet train which is a carving snowboard.
 

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@MrDavey2Shoes @garikgarik

Dear all, I am very much pleased to see your comments, which I found very helpful for me. I have finished my third season in my snowboarding life. This year, I have been in mountains total 15 days. But in the third day, my left ankle was sprained to outside and I was suffering from ankle pain all other days. Anyway.

Here is my video with soft board, soft boots and soft binding. the waist size of this full camber board is 25cm. All I tried to get more lying on my heelside while carving. Actually I feel wonderful until I watched this video. When I see this, I am really disappointed :)

Greetings from Istanbul.
 

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Looking good so far! Some tips, try not to bend at the waist. Also, keep your weight on the front foot longer and stay on the side cut. It looks like you might be rushing the turns a little by pushing your back foot around too soon.
 

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Looking good so far! Some tips, try not to bend at the waist. Also, keep your weight on the front foot longer and stay on the side cut. It looks like you might be rushing the turns a little by pushing your back foot around too soon.
Thanks for advice.

toe side : I can stay on the side cut easily. even make a complete circle pushing on my front foot. however,
heel side : I cannot. eventhough the heelside edge is sharper then toeside, I cannot draw that smooth line on the ground. the board is chattered anyway. I think this is something about my skills and I have to practice more.

try not to bend at the waist.
I ll keep in mind for the next season.
 

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i’d change the boots and bindings to stiffer ones, it adds control and protects ankles, if the fit is correct. i don’t think your current board has exhausted its potential and you’d benefit from riding stiffer and larger board, it might be counterproductive. however if you feel like getting a new board, i’d look at something like salomon dancehaul or niseko pleasures. Drive your knees into the snow on the toe edge, on the heel edge lean with your upper body over the heel edge inside the turn, before bending in the waist, on the toe edge bend back from the snow in your waist and shoulders, don’t try to reach the snow with your arm.
 

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On the heel edge it is kinda important to set the turn early in the first part of the arc. On the video rider moves its leading heap forward but the torso is over the tail of the board
158160

Part of the body weight is outside of the turn - shoulders and head over the toe edge, part of the weight over the heel edge. Rider is looking down the slope, looking inside the turn helps better.
Lean into the turn with your upper body first, pull your toes up, then bend in the waist, look inside the turn, shift the weight on to your back leg during the turn
 

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i’d change the boots and bindings to stiffer ones, it adds control and protects ankles, if the fit is correct. i don’t think your current board has exhausted its potential and you’d benefit from riding stiffer and larger board, it might be counterproductive. however if you feel like getting a new board, i’d look at something like salomon dancehaul or niseko pleasures. Drive your knees into the snow on the toe edge, on the heel edge lean with your upper body over the heel edge inside the turn, before bending in the waist, on the toe edge bend back from the snow in your waist and shoulders, don’t try to reach the snow with your arm.
Oh no, I see this video very late at the end of the season :( now, I have to wait for next season to make some practice. but, I feel that is something wrong in my riding.. This is the mistakes I exactly made whole this season. Thanks dudes, I read every one of your comments word by word... You will see better videos here next season.
 

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Oh no, I see this video very late at the end of the season :( now, I have to wait for next season to make some practice. but, I feel that is something wrong in my riding.. This is the mistakes I exactly made whole this season. Thanks dudes, I read every one of your comments word by word... You will see better videos here next season.
I think you’ve made hell of progress for couple of seasons of riding. Slight changes in the technic may actually help to keep your ankles safe.
 

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I think you’ve made hell of progress for couple of seasons of riding. Slight changes in the technic may actually help to keep your ankles safe.
Thanks maan, your comments was very helpful. I save them all for the next season to progress in technical and better way. Carving is so much fun. I don't express my feeling at the beginning of this season when I stand on edges. I really thank you very much for your above comments which I cannot correct it by myself.
 

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Thanks maan, your comments was very helpful. I save them all for the next season to progress in technical and better way. Carving is so much fun. I don't express my feeling at the beginning of this season when I stand on edges. I really thank you very much for your above comments which I cannot correct it by myself.
No worries, mate)
 
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