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I think one other board to consider is the Jones Dream Catcher. It not only looks good but it's a RCR hybrid. So it's rocker in the contact points and camber in the middle. Makes for a board with a lot of control of camber without the tradition catchyness. It also has raised 3D edges near the contact points to help against catching an edge and to float in powder plus easily initiate turns.

This board should be a great board to learn on and progress all the way to even advanced or beyond. Especially since you're already used to camber I imagine a change to a rocker dominant board would feel washy and unstable.
I'd second this, the Dream Catcher has a tonne of rocker in the tip and tail which makes it very forgiving, but the underfoot camber and magnetraction give it the grip when you need it. My girlfriend has one and loves it, when she first started riding it she kept saying how it was impossible for her to catch an edge on it. Though she is an advanced rider, you CAN catch an edge on anything, but it is very forgiving for the level of performance it has. Definitely something you could ride from beginner to advanced and never be left wanting more.
 
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Discussion Starter #42
Ok, let's move to newbire questions here. I was trying to avoid them, but it seems I cannot.
Neni proposes a Camber-Rocker-Camber, saying that it is very forgiving especially in edge catching. Phedder and Jack86 sweras by a Rocker-Camber-Rocker board for the same reason. But those profiles are opposite one to another. What characteristics of the profile (but also others) make a board forgiving (i.e. less edge catching)?

Good news is that both Jones Dream Catcher and Nitro Mystique(*) seems available around here also in biggest size. Never Summer is actually more difficult to find.

(*) assuming that I have correctly understood Nitro Gullwing profile.
 

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You are understanding the Gullwing profile correctly.

So hybrid CRC seems like there is more camber since there is two Cs; but it's actually a rocker dominant board. Meaning if you were to lay it flat on the floor it will be able to teeter totter left and right like a seesaw. The contact points is typically the middle. They put in some camber to give a bit better edge hold on a mostly rocker board. Rocker boards are forgiving a little too forgiving and wash out as the edge doesn't make the same amount of contact with the snow. That's why camber is mixed in; to give a little bit more edge control.

Hybrid RCR is a camber dominant board. It rockers out at the contact points. Meaning if you put it on the floor the board will make contact where the tip and tail flair up. Middle will be raised off the floor and no teeter totter. They add rocker in those contact points to make it a bit forgiving so the edge doesn't catch as easily. So basically the opposite scenario as above. You have a board with more edge control but less catchyness.

The dream catcher also adds some 3D contouring to the nose and tail. 3D shapes are the new big technology. What this does in addition to the rocker contact points is it lifts the edges a bit higher off the snow in the nose and tail making it even less catchy. Think of a spoon 🥄 on the table the nose and tail are more spoon like. Also this makes turning easier as well as floating in deeper snow.

In short...
CRC: rocker dominant teeter totter. Rocker to be really forgiving with camber to bring back some control and edge hold.

RCR: mostly camber board with excellent edge hold and control. With added rocker to make the edges at the contact points from being to catchy there for being a bit more forgiving than traditional camber.

3D shaping now can be different. In dream catcher we are talking about spoon like nose and tail so if you add that to a RCR board like the dream catcher does now you have a board that is likely as forgiving as a rocker dominant but has the edge hold and control of a camber board.

Since you're used to a camber board already I think you'll be disappointed on a rocker dominant board and the feeling of losing some control. So RCR is what I would recommend.
 

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Ok, let's move to newbire questions here. I was trying to avoid them, but it seems I cannot.
Neni proposes a Camber-Rocker-Camber, saying that it is very forgiving especially in edge catching. Phedder and Jack86 sweras by a Rocker-Camber-Rocker board for the same reason. But those profiles are opposite one to another. What characteristics of the profile (but also others) make a board forgiving (i.e. less edge catching)?

Good news is that both Jones Dream Catcher and Nitro Mystique(*) seems available around here also in biggest size. Never Summer is actually more difficult to find.

(*) assuming that I have correctly understood Nitro Gullwing profile.
You have correctly understood the Gullwing profile, and they're definitely fair questions trying to wrap your head around all of this!

Here's a good overall rundown of the profiles - Understanding the Different Snowboard Camber Types | Snowboarding Profiles

I'm not disagreeing with Neni at all either, though you're right we've recommended different profiles they both try to maintain some of the benefits of camber and benefits of rocker while minimizing the negatives of those profiles. The Camber-Rocker-Camber (Gullwing, NeverSummers etc) have the rocker between the feet which can end up creating a pivot point, which makes it very easy to disengage essentially half of the boards edge from the snow. Shift your weight back enough, the whole front half of the board will lift off the snow (maybe only a few mm, but enough to make it 'loose') and you can pivot around that center rocker. Same shifting your weight forward, in moguls and tight terrain you can put weight on the nose to initiate and lead the turn, and the rear half of the board releases from the snow so it's very quick and easy for you to now pivot around on the front half of the board to make a quick and tight turn. You can also do that on any full rocker board, but with full rocker you do lose a lot of drive, pop and edgehold that the camber provides. So putting camber back under the feet returns some of those attributes.

Rocker-Camber-Rocker overall will feel more familiar to you since you already ride a full camber board, but with the rocker in the tip and tail when you're riding flat based there's much less of the board length actually touching the snow, so again they feel easier to turn and more forgiving. If your camber board is 150cm, flat based you might have 115cm of board touching the snow. On a RCR board, that same 150cm board length might be closer to 100cm of board actually touching the snow. That's what makes it harder to catch an edge, as there's less edge touching to catch with. But once you tilt the board on edge to carve or turn, the edge on those rocker sections that wasn't touching the snow before, now is, and helping give you grip and drive.

Ultimately both profiles are more catch free because they decrease the overall edge contact and edge pressure when the board is flat, compared to a full camber board. A RCR board will feel more familiar to you initially, just a bit looser at the tips. A CRC board will feel quite different for you at first but once you get comfortable with it, you may prefer that central pivot point feeling compared to something with camber between the feet.

Obviously being able to Demo either profile would make your decision much easier, but no matter which one you pick it will be easier for you to ride than a full camber board.
 

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I agree with @Phedder as he essentially mirrored my thoughts on the subject. Below is a snippet I took from Evo's website that has a very brief description of the profiles we are talking about. But also gives you a diagram of the two.

157998

157999


So I recently got my girlfriend a feelgood flying V (CRC). But she demoed both a camber and the flying v. Initially she tried the camber (full camber) and loved the control she got from it. Then she tried the flying V and enjoyed how it was less catchy. Ultimately she felt comfortable with the CRC because she was coming from a Rocker only board. But she feels like she would like a Camber next season. Likely Dream Catcher

Essential both profiles try to accomplish the same thing by bringing qualities of both extremes together. That's why when @neni and we suggest these two different profiles for the same thing.

Now if you were going fill rocker or full camber the reasons for our suggestions would be totally different.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Thank you guys for all your comments. I really appreciate it. I love to learn all about what I like: I already saw snowboarding profile site, but I was still missing how this impacts riding.

Side note: I dearly love my hubbie, but sometimes I wish he was a rider too.
 

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The Swiss Miss
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Since you're used to a camber board already I think you'll be disappointed on a rocker dominant board and the feeling of losing some control. So RCR is what I would recommend.
I really don't understand where this "losing some control" connected with CRC comes from... I ride my CRC, RCR, trad camber boards all in full control. You do a turn where you want to do it, you break where you want, ride fast as you want. There's no less control with CRC.

The different profiles ride different, as Phedder put it well. But you as a rider can adapt to those specific patterns and ride each of them in control. It took me three runs runs to adapt to CRC. It's not hard.

Besides, in moguls, I feel in much more control on a CRC than a camber dominant board as they are way faster turning ;). So... that generalization of "losing control" is really not valid, IMO.
 
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I really don't understand where this "losing some control" connected with CRC comes from... I ride my CRC, RCR, trad camber boards all in full control. You do a turn where you want to do it, you break where you want, ride fast as you want. There's no less control with CRC.

The different profiles ride different, as Phedder put it well. But you as a rider can adapt to those specific patterns and ride each of them in control. It took me three runs runs to adapt to CRC. It's not hard.

Besides, in moguls, I feel in much more control on a CRC than a camber dominant board as they are way faster turning ;). So... that generalization of "losing control" is really not valid, IMO.
I see why you interpreted it that way but that's not quit what I said. I said the feeling of losing some control. There is no question the locked in feeling that exists in a camber dominant board and not having that can feel like you're lacking some control. I guess it's more of a bad choice of words and I should have said loose feeling. Essential locked in and loose are the terms that describe difference with camber vs rocker.

You being an experienced rider and likely adapt to any board handed to you. Someone new who has experience with a more locked in board moving to a more loose board will likely feel as though they lost some control. Yes with time will adapt sure. But it'll be foreign at first. A RCR board in this situation is a much more familiar feeling for @Maya but still be more forgiving than the tradition camber they've been riding. In turn help with progression. That is why that's my upmost recommendation followed with CRC. I do not recommend a pure rocker board unless it's someone who has not touched the snow ever before.

I have nothing against CRC boards. As I mentioned that was the right choice for my girlfriend this season as she was coming from a pure rocker board.

This scenario is different and in my opinion a RCR would be a better fit here.

Edit fixed some RCR/CRC terms... I'm even confusing myself sorry.
 

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Never Summer is relaunching the camber-rocker-camber-rocker-camber. Don’t remember who did it last. If it succeeds, I bet they will make it directional with camber-rocker-camber-rocker-camber-rocker. Think they are mainly sold in switzerland and germany in europe.

Whichever board you choose in the end, make sure you like the flex of it, and some rocker in the nose is always nice.
 

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Never Summer is relaunching the camber-rocker-camber-rocker-camber. Don’t remember who did it last. If it succeeds, I bet they will make it directional with camber-rocker-camber-rocker-camber-rocker. Think they are mainly sold in switzerland and germany in europe.

Whichever board you choose in the end, make sure you like the flex of it, and some rocker in the nose is always nice.
I remember when disposable razors first came out with the 2-blade, then the 3-blade versions. I started making jokes about the number of blades going up every year.

Welp. Seven blades
 

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Rocker dominant boards like CRC usually have to add some type of grip tech because they inherently have less grip than camber dominant boards. Grip equates to a sense of control. I'm not saying there's no control to be found with CRC, but rocker dominant profiles are naturally less locked in feeling. That changes deck to deck, but overall the feel holds up in my experience. You can absolutely ride rocker dominant boards in control, but they have natural limitations in some settings as do camber dominant boards. The trick is to match up the profile to the type of riding you'd like to see out of a deck. I'd be curious to try a CRC again on a dedicated tree board. I'm no longer interested in CRC for carving.

I haven't used a razor for about as long as I've been off of rocker lol. Camber and beards for me please.
 

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I shave maybe once every 6 months or so now a days. I don't like upkeeping my facial hair so it grows huge then all gone. When I shave it's always with a safety razor and now from this discussion I ended up ordering that new "gillette" razor I linked above. Gillette hasn't made these razors since the 80s so it's just a rebrand with a clone of their throwback box but still had to have it. For a guy who barley shaves.... I have a razor buying problem like I do a Snowboard buying one.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
I wrote and delete 10 different comments n
safety razors, but I guess this is not the right topic for me to discuss in a board full of men :ROFLMAO:

However I have always had buying issue of sport gear. Now I want to buy snowboard, bindings, jacket, pants (I hope I used correct words here). And, why not include also boots? Or something for the thermic layer?
What is keeping money in my pocket is just that I hate having sport gear that I don't use. But let me book one lessons or buy one pass for next year and I will spend all my money in all possibile equipment.
 

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I wrote and delete 10 different comments n
safety razors, but I guess this is not the right topic for me to discuss in a board full of men :ROFLMAO:

However I have always had buying issue of sport gear. Now I want to buy snowboard, bindings, jacket, pants (I hope I used correct words here). And, why not include also boots? Or something for the thermic layer?
What is keeping money in my pocket is just that I hate having sport gear that I don't use. But let me book one lessons or buy one pass for next year and I will spend all my money in all possibile equipment.
Haha don't you worry I got my girlfriend a safety razor as a gift several years ago with a pink handle!

I know what you mean about the gear. I can be a big gear nut once I get into something.
 

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I wrote and delete 10 different comments n
safety razors, but I guess this is not the right topic for me to discuss in a board full of men :ROFLMAO:

However I have always had buying issue of sport gear. Now I want to buy snowboard, bindings, jacket, pants (I hope I used correct words here). And, why not include also boots? Or something for the thermic layer?
What is keeping money in my pocket is just that I hate having sport gear that I don't use. But let me book one lessons or buy one pass for next year and I will spend all my money in all possibile equipment.
You'll fit in fine around here.
 

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The Swiss Miss
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. I'd be curious to try a CRC again on a dedicated tree board. I'm no longer interested in CRC for carving.
If you mean tree riding as tree riding in pow, then totally to it, give CRC a chance. The ones I use, Harpoon and Lady West, are awesome in our tree&pow terrain (east coast tree riding without pow I have no clue about)

Agree on carving. That's the one thing I prefer my trad camber over CRC (and RCR, btw). CRC do carve, easily, but never as smooth and beautifully and "linear" as a full camber.
 
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