Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been seriously snowboarding for two seasons now (around 20-25 days per season) and I think it's time for me to switch to a more advanced board.

I don't know much about boards, so I was hoping you guys could give some advice as to qualities I should look for in my next board.

I am currently using a 2012 Rossignol Taipan:
- Size: 156cm
- Shape: Directional Twin w/AmpTek All-Mountain Camber (60% rocker, 40% camber)
- Flex: 6/10

Pros:
- I can spin around with no problem.
- Easy to control when riding switch.

Cons:
- I'm quite a bit slower than my friends on shallow inclines.
- Board initiates turns when riding slow unless I keep my back leg very stiff.

I believe I need a longer board to alleviate my speed and turn issues.
I'm quite lost when it comes to the effects of camber and rocker.
As well, I don't know how flex affects riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Weight: 165 lbs
Height: 5'8"
Shoe size: 10 US

I'll check out those explanations, thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Okay, I've read the explanations but I'm still unclear on what the best profile is for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I ride in powder, bomb down groomers, and have slowly started to hit jumps in the park.
I like to do little tricks (180s and 360s) off features as I ride down.
I like to ride switch on easier runs (for practice).

I guess that's classified as all mountain.

I do not hit rails, but I suppose that could change as my skill increases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
919 Posts
Okay, I've read the explanations but I'm still unclear on what the best profile is for me.
This is not going to be an answer that you like but, the truth is the best profile for you is whatever you like the best.
I like TBT the best (modified camber)
SnoWolf speaks very highly of CRC
Nivek tends to like camber in his suggestions
others love flat

It really all depends on how you like the board to feel and perform.
Demo's are your friend.
 

·
Reformed Creep-o-saurus
Joined
·
6,863 Posts
I ride in powder, bomb down groomers, and have slowly started to hit jumps in the park.
I like to do little tricks (180s and 360s) off features as I ride down.
I like to ride switch on easier runs (for practice).

I guess that's classified as all mountain.

I do not hit rails, but I suppose that could change as my skill increases.
What resort(s) do you ride at regularly? You sound like an all mountain rider, but board needs are vastly different between an all mountain rider in Whistler, vs an all mountain at Glen Eden in Toronto. :yahoo:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
@cav0011: I figured as much, I was just hoping there was an easier answer.
Do any of the profiles affect speed? As I mentioned, I'm having issues on shallow (near flat) inclines.

@poutanen: I normally ride Castle Mountain (Alberta), Lake Louise (Alberta), and Marmot Basin (Alberta).
And when I'm lucky enough Fernie (BC), Kicking Horse (BC), Panorama (BC), and Revelstoke (BC).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
@cav0011: I figured as much, I was just hoping there was an easier answer.
Do any of the profiles affect speed? As I mentioned, I'm having issues on shallow (near flat) inclines.
Speed in flats is a matter of good edging, a good wax job, and a good base (sintered is in most cases faster than extruded, but not always). It doesn't really have to do with the camber profile. The profile gets important when you want to carve fast and hard.
 

·
Reformed Creep-o-saurus
Joined
·
6,863 Posts
@poutanen: I normally ride Castle Mountain (Alberta), Lake Louise (Alberta), and Marmot Basin (Alberta).
And when I'm lucky enough Fernie (BC), Kicking Horse (BC), Panorama (BC), and Revelstoke (BC).
Fair enough, some people say they ride in "powder" but live in an area where 2" of fresh is a "EPIC POW DAY!!!" lol

Just looked up the specs of your current board and it's really pretty decent for the type of riding and terrain you do. If you really want to upgrade I'd look for something with similar specs. Directional freeride, RCR profile, etc.

You're probably right about on for size, but I'm only slightly heavier than you and ride a 160 on the same mountains about 30+ days a year, although I do a lot of off-piste riding, so the length helps in the powder.

If your biggest problem with your board is speed on flats, and it wanting to turn on it's own. I agree with Basti in that it's more likely you just need more practice and/or a lesson or two. You've already got a sintered base. Do you tune it yourself, or get a shop to do it? How often?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I'm lucky enough to be close to mountains that actually get real powder.

I've actually gotten the board to stop turning on it's own (after some practice) by keeping my back leg pretty rigid. I just assumed the easy turning had to do with my speed problem.

The main indication to me that I have a speed problem is that my friends (who are all around the same skill level) can be 30 feet behind me coming down a steep incline, then when we hit the flat area I just slow down (almost coming to a halt sometimes) and they easily pass me and continue on.

Perhaps this is a tune problem? I take it to a shop, usually after every 4-5 days of riding.
 

·
Reformed Creep-o-saurus
Joined
·
6,863 Posts
The main indication to me that I have a speed problem is that my friends (who are all around the same skill level) can be 30 feet behind me coming down a steep incline, then when we hit the flat area I just slow down (almost coming to a halt sometimes) and they easily pass me and continue on.

Perhaps this is a tune problem? I take it to a shop, usually after every 4-5 days of riding.
There's a big thread somewhere around here about maintaining your speed on flats. It's a good read. It really has very little to do with the board. You want to do little carves instead of trying to stand straight up flat.

I think most of our shops do half decent tunes, so that shouldn't be an issue...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
Do your friends weigh more than you? Momentum is huge in carrying speed and building it fast. If you are 165 and they are in the 180-200 range this could explain things. As well as what poutanen said about using subtle edging on flats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
There's a big thread somewhere around here about maintaining your speed on flats. It's a good read. It really has very little to do with the board. You want to do little carves instead of trying to stand straight up flat.
I'll have to find that thread, I had no idea about the little carves.

Do your friends weigh more than you? Momentum is huge in carrying speed and building it fast. If you are 165 and they are in the 180-200 range this could explain things. As well as what poutanen said about using subtle edging on flats.
You're actually spot on about the weight difference.

I guess I should buy a similar board, work on my little carves, and gain some weight :laugh:

Any thoughts on brand? I suppose each of you has your own preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
I guess I should buy a similar board, work on my little carves, and gain some weight :laugh:

Any thoughts on brand? I suppose each of you has your own preference.
You really don't need a new board. Especially not a similar one. The Taipan is very solid and from what I can tell is not holding you back. It really just sounds like you need to work on your riding a bit more. Save your money and get a few lessons.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
You really don't need a new board. Especially not a similar one. The Taipan is very solid and from what I can tell is not holding you back. It really just sounds like you need to work on your riding a bit more. Save your money and get a few lessons.
I agree with that. The gear whore in me wants it to be different - but if his riding is significantly affected by things like 'stiffening of the rear leg' to keep the board running straight, then realistically the OP should be investing in improving proper technique (i.e., take lessons) rather than new gear.
The old adage of 99% rider 1% equipment seems particularly apposite here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
You really don't need a new board. Especially not a similar one. The Taipan is very solid and from what I can tell is not holding you back. It really just sounds like you need to work on your riding a bit more. Save your money and get a few lessons.
I suppose riding on flats is something I don't get to practice very often, and probably need more work on.

Saving money definitely is a good thing, however, I cracked the top laminate near the tail of my board (the core and base seem to be fine). Is this something that can be fixed?
 

·
Reformed Creep-o-saurus
Joined
·
6,863 Posts
I suppose riding on flats is something I don't get to practice very often, and probably need more work on.

Saving money definitely is a good thing, however, I cracked the top laminate near the tail of my board (the core and base seem to be fine). Is this something that can be fixed?
Yup... if it's just the topsheet then epoxy is the way to go. It may not look pretty but that's the permanent fix. If you mean cracked as in spider cracked, then I wouldn't worry about it, just ride it until it's done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Yup... if it's just the topsheet then epoxy is the way to go. It may not look pretty but that's the permanent fix. If you mean cracked as in spider cracked, then I wouldn't worry about it, just ride it until it's done!
It's split worse than a spider crack, I'll try epoxy.

Thanks for all of the advice guys!
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top