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As much as I appreciate the sentiment, is this really a worthwhile endeavor? I equate it to a craftsman saying "I will intentionally use less-optimal tools to work on honing my technique".

For the sake of the discussion, another example: as a guitar player, that's like me saying "I'll practice on a guitar that hasn't been setup to work on my technique". A guitar that isn't properly set up is tougher to play, but it's still doable with some adapting. Does this really equate to getting better at the skill?
As a guitar player I would equate it to saying I will practice my fundamentals on my acoustic to ensure I am playing as cleanly as possible as opposed to through my electric on a channel with gain where my shortfalls are made up for by the gain on the amp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,242 ·
It's important to mix up your boards because the one board cannot do it all in every condition and changing seems to really help you break habits that are holding you back.

Riding slowly with turns completed to the absolute limit is my new hobby in bad conditions.
 

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what would be the snowboard equivalent of having reverb on w/ dirty amp at all times?
 

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Riding fast
Speaking of which, is there a speed limit for carving? Or will great technique eventually allow you to carve at super fast speeds?
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,248 · (Edited)
I have a feeling that, like a nice carve at the flat end of a run, this thread might just come full circle.
3 days ago I did the best carving of my life on 1m of edge.
The board is only one part of the traction equation with the other being snow condition, the more your board sinks in to the snow the less edge you need to achieve the same amount of traction.
So taking too much edge to a piste that is providing a healthy dose of traction is unnecessary, kind of like chopping an onion with a machete, its over kill and you might just cut your finger in the process.

So on a beautiful soft snow day the best tool is a short edge board to release you from your turns easily.
On a hard snow day the snow isn't giving you much feedback so you need a longer edge.
✌ ✌ ✌
 

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Speaking of which, is there a speed limit for carving? Or will great technique eventually allow you to carve at super fast speeds?
I've been feeling out a very variable speed limit. There's limitations imposed by my technique, the conditions, the slope, my gear, and how all those factors interact. There's a sweet spot where you can go quite fast. G-forces in turns start stacking up with speed. Your turns get longer and straighter the faster you go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,250 ·
Speaking of which, is there a speed limit for carving? Or will great technique eventually allow you to carve at super fast speeds?
When you fail to hold your edge you just caught yourself speeding
 

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what would be the snowboard equivalent of having reverb on w/ dirty amp at all times?
Reverb on a dirty amp is mushy verses delay on a dirty amp is huge...so sloppy technique
DSCF9574.JPG


Speaking of which, is there a speed limit for carving? Or will great technique eventually allow you to carve at super fast speeds?
Great technique will allow you to carve at super slow speeds. Years ago saw this rider carving pencil thin lines while going slightly faster than walking speed...twas blown away.
 

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So taking too much edge to a piste that is providing a healthy dose of traction is unnecessary, kind of like chopping an onion with a machete, its over kill and you might just cut your finger in the process.
Not sure if I understand you correctly. But it looks to me like you are saying: "If your technique is good enough for difficult conditions, you should get another board for easier conditions, because your technique is probably not good enough for those."
Oh come on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,254 ·
Not sure if I understand you correctly. But it looks to me like you are saying: "If your technique is good enough for difficult conditions, you should get another board for easier conditions, because your technique is probably not good enough for those."
Oh come on.
Quit it with the negative vibes please Aracan.
People come in here to talk about or think about abstract ideas related to carving, you come in for other reasons.
Have a good think about your reasons and what energy you are channelling when you post in this thread because you come off disgruntled.
Lets swing the vibe the other way please, why don't you add something positive, thought provoking or otherwise interesting instead of trying to trip me up.
 

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Not sure if I understand you correctly. But it looks to me like you are saying: "If your technique is good enough for difficult conditions, you should get another board for easier conditions, because your technique is probably not good enough for those."
Oh come on.
I think of it as more “bring the right board for the conditions.”
 

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Have a good think about your reasons
Entertainment, mostly. Two years ago, when this thread started and the "extremely short wide board" was presented as the surprising solution to carving (along with body movements which were rather hard to explain), I was wondering if
a) everybody else had missed something important in the last twenty years or so
or b) you would revise your opinion, and if that, how long it would take.
Turns out that “b)” and “two years”.
I was also wondering when you would treat us to your good self putting your theories to the test (as in actually carving, on actual video, in actual non-perfect conditions).
Answer: maybe later, because, oh crap, all those pesky powder days.
People come in here to talk about or think about abstract ideas related to carving,
Truer words were never written.
Quit it with the negative vibes please Aracan.
I thought this was a discussion, not an agreeing contest. I believe you said (at least you couldn't be bothered to enlighten me otherwise, instead choosing to chastize me about the quality of my “energy”) that one should get a special board for those rare days when conditions are nice enough that anyone halfway competent could carve on their toilet door. In case I haven’t made myself clear:
That's bullshit. If you can carve on hardpack but aren't able to carve leisurely on grippy snow there is something wrong with your technique, not with your board.
I think of it as more “bring the right board for the conditions.”
If your first board is a GS board with an 18 cm waist, then by all means get another board for those mellower days. If your first board is a modern slalom board, or an all-around alpine board, or anything meant to be ridden in softboots, chances are it is plenty mellow. And if anyone still insists that you need a “mellow” board, you might justifiably ask yourself why. Especially if it involves a faulty comparison with edged weapons.
 

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I've got a quiver of three powder boards for different depths and types of snow and freeriding. Why not have a quiver for carving as well? Certainly there's an ideal tool for different conditions. I've been getting a lot of enjoyment out of switching between two.

I've been carving on a 262ww 160 Pentaquark, and a 286ww 151 Slush Slasher. There's a huge difference between soft and hard snow conditions, and there's a huge difference in those boards. The shorter wider board is better at soft conditions hands down. It's got extra width to accommodate the deeper trenches you lay in soft snow, and it doesn't get stuck in it's own trench as easily. I prefer the extra grip of the long board when it's really firm out. However, that board's pretty narrow for soft conditions. I'm still getting boot and heel contact with my bindings set at 42/30. If it started getting wider, it would get too heavy quickly.
 

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Whatever rocks your boat. As long as you don't tell me that it's somehow dangerous ("might cut your finger") to ride a more capable board in conditions that don't demand it …
 

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Entertainment, mostly. Two years ago, when this thread started and the "extremely short wide board" was presented as the surprising solution to carving (along with body movements which were rather hard to explain), I was wondering if
a) everybody else had missed something important in the last twenty years or so
or b) you would revise your opinion, and if that, how long it would take.
Turns out that “b)” and “two years”.
I was also wondering when you would treat us to your good self putting your theories to the test (as in actually carving, on actual video, in actual non-perfect conditions).
Answer: maybe later, because, oh crap, all those pesky powder days.

Truer words were never written.

I thought this was a discussion, not an agreeing contest. I believe you said (at least you couldn't be bothered to enlighten me otherwise, instead choosing to chastize me about the quality of my “energy”) that one should get a special board for those rare days when conditions are nice enough that anyone halfway competent could carve on their toilet door. In case I haven’t made myself clear:
That's bullshit. If you can carve on hardpack but aren't able to carve leisurely on grippy snow there is something wrong with your technique, not with your board.

If your first board is a GS board with an 18 cm waist, then by all means get another board for those mellower days. If your first board is a modern slalom board, or an all-around alpine board, or anything meant to be ridden in softboots, chances are it is plenty mellow. And if anyone still insists that you need a “mellow” board, you might justifiably ask yourself why. Especially if it involves a faulty comparison with edged weapons.
You need it because it’s FUN. There’s no way in hell you can lump every carving board into one category. They all ride differently. And the experience you feel carving on differing decks on differing conditions is one of the best smile inducing things about snowboarding.
 
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