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Do you think it's more splay or a more square rear foot that adds power to toe turns?
Like creating that same splay by reducing the rear angle instead would probably make more people feel a stronger toe turn.
I have found I like more rear angle as I started doing my toe turns with a rotated upper body, when my body was more square I liked the more square rear angle.
The more square the rear foot...does add power to initiate the toe turns. However wondering if a more rotated (in to the toeside) upper body could be used more...because...having a square rear foot helps getting into the toeside carve...but does not help in tucking or rolling your knee toward the nose to get low and in the backseat at the end of the toeside carve. OTOH, more likely retarded and struggling trying to figure some of this stuff out.
 

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Do you think it's more splay or a more square rear foot that adds power to toe turns?
Like creating that same splay by reducing the rear angle instead would probably make more people feel a stronger toe turn.
In a nutshell, both. But my rear angle is a given resulting from boot size and board width. With my boards I cannot go lower than 40° and still avoid overhang. I have been told by experienced riders with smaller feet that an even lower angle is beneficial.
However, I know from experience that increasing splay by increasing the front angle will also improve the toeside turn. There seems to be an upper limit. Personally, I don't really feel comfortable on a 24 cm board with an angle noticeable higher than, say, 65°.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,283 ·
Personally, I don't really feel comfortable on a 24 cm board with an angle noticeable higher than, say, 65°.
Interesting.
I've not been to such extreme angles as 65 degrees but I am finding myself embracing more narrow boards these days due to the higher rear binding angle.
I'm on a 27cm waist now for firm conditions and only pull out the 30cm boards for soft snow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,284 · (Edited)
The more square the rear foot...does add power to initiate the toe turns.
I used to feel the same thing and that's why I was loving 30cm waist widths but as I started doing toe turns in a new style with the rotated upper body I am finding I can deliver a lot of power to the toe edge by pushing my rear hip down to the snow.
When you do a toe turn with rotated upper body your hips are at 90 degrees to the board instead of parallel, and this allows you to get weight over the toe edge in a new way and I'm finding it to be very effective.

Eg +48 +33 hips at 90 degrees (chairlift edit, it's more like 45 degrees) and heavily pushing that rear hip to the snow, only closing the upper body in the last 10% of the toe turn.
 

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The main thing you gain from more binding angle is a greater ability to rotate your upper body into a heel turn friendly position. I changed from duck stance +15 -15 to FF stance and I really enjoy it but it is such a personal thing. My angles are +48 +33 on most of my boards these days which sounds extreme but I slowly worked my way up to those numbers.
As a 50 year old looking to cruise groomers I think a forward forward stance would suit you for sure.
Set up at +30 +15 and steer with your front hip when you first try it. ✌
How much different is that then what I have pictured. I forgot to check numbers when I took them off. I just set them up Initially how my feet felt comfortable standing in them. Also does it make sense to set up a little bit back on the board of center if your never riding switch ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,286 ·
What you have there look like +15 +3 to me.
It's very moderate, not really taking advantage of a forward forward stance.
The only real answer is the one that feels good to you so have a play around with it and realise that your style will change and grow in time, as you get more used to FF stance you tend to increase the angles more and more.
 

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When you do a toe turn with rotated upper body your hips are at 90 degrees to the board instead of parallel, and this allows you to get weight over the toe edge in a new way and I'm finding it to be very effective.
I may be picturing this wrong, but it sounds like you are advocating the advantages of counter-rotation for toeside turns.
 

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Yes that’s what I’m asking. It is setup for goofy foot I’m a lefty. But I’m wondering if I should setup a little bit towards the back of the board since I never ride switch. How often do guys setup not in the center. I suppose most guys go switch once in a while. I know I never will. I feel incredibly off balance switch and I’m to old to bust my ass learning it. Just not important. Neither was sking backwards lol.
 

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Yes that’s what I’m asking. It is setup for goofy foot I’m a lefty. But I’m wondering if I should setup a little bit towards the back of the board since I never ride switch. How often do guys setup not in the center. I suppose most guys go switch once in a while. I know I never will. I feel incredibly off balance switch and I’m to old to bust my ass learning it. Just not important. Neither was sking backwards lol.
The board should be marked with a reference stance, which will put you inline with wherever the manufacturer intended you to be relative to the sidecut. Some people like to shift backwards relative to the reference stance, usually to increase float, but also sometimes for technique reasons. Personal preference, and if you want to try it out go for it--I spent a few days this season riding with extra setback to see how it affected my carving.

If MrDavey is right and your bindings are forward of the reference stance, then you should definitely move them back.
 

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The board should be marked with a reference stance, which will put you inline with wherever the manufacturer intended you to be relative to the sidecut. Some people like to shift backwards relative to the reference stance, usually to increase float, but also sometimes for technique reasons. Personal preference, and if you want to try it out go for it--I spent a few days this season riding with extra setback to see how it affected my carving.

If MrDavey is right and your bindings are forward of the reference stance, then you should definitely move them back.
I don’t see anything around the holes in the board for reference to stance. When you say float you mean foot powder to keep nose up. I’m only getting to ride groomers if I’m lucky here on east coast va
 

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I don’t see anything around the holes in the board for reference to stance. When you say float you mean foot powder to keep nose up. I’m only getting to ride groomers if I’m lucky here on east coast va
Yes set back for powder.

I have a wide stance and still try to center that around the reference. If it can’t be even I’ll hedge to rear of reference.
 

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Ive got a few days riding on v4.0 now. This is the one.
I will be making a small run of 10 decks and that will be it until next summer, if any of you guys want one speak up and I will make sure you get a personalized one with your name written on the core.
This first batch will be JP¥30,000 and after that they will be priced higher.
Deck only.
Suits 10 inch trucks.
Legit snowboard carving experience.
Money back to anyone who isnt satisfied, no questions.
Also I will be doing a group shipping order to the US via Wigmar so shipping should not be too expensive collectively.

Thank you.

View attachment 154092
Has this group buy passed already? I'm looking for a long board to practice my turns.
 

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Two handed heelsides- Conditions were extremely firm and icy yesterday after many freeze and thaw cycles. There was some slush to be slashed at the base, but that transitioned into blue ice at the top. I found a sunny lower blue run that was just soft enough to set an edge into if you committed hard. The sketchy conditions had me putting both hands down on toe turns, which seemed to help with how icy it was. Well, I was inspired to put both hands down on heel turns as well. I'd seen it in videos, but I never thought I'd be able to get that back arm around and down. After a season spent getting low heelside, both hands down on heels turns was actually pretty easy. I liked how it commits a ton weight up front over the nose. Initiations had so much commitment there was no problem driving the edge into the firm slope. I prefer one hand down for both toe and heel side turns, but having the option of two hands is nice.
 

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Two handed heelsides- Conditions were extremely firm and icy yesterday after many freeze and thaw cycles. There was some slush to be slashed at the base, but that transitioned into blue ice at the top. I found a sunny lower blue run that was just soft enough to set an edge into if you committed hard. The sketchy conditions had me putting both hands down on toe turns, which seemed to help with how icy it was. Well, I was inspired to put both hands down on heel turns as well. I'd seen it in videos, but I never thought I'd be able to get that back arm around and down. After a season spent getting low heelside, both hands down on heels turns was actually pretty easy. I liked how it commits a ton weight up front over the nose. Initiations had so much commitment there was no problem driving the edge into the firm slope. I prefer one hand down for both toe and heel side turns, but having the option of two hands is nice.
Yeah but two hands looks much cooler.
 
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