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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, so I've been doing A LOT of research and have come across conflicting information...So I decided to post up in here.

My question is, what are the disadvantages of riding a board that is too small based on my weight??


A little background:
Up until now, Ive only ridden east coast, packed snow (ice).
I consider myself an intermediate rider (3 years, +20X/year)
My winter weight is 200-210lbs and I'm 5'11".
Size 12 boot.
I just moved to CO and plan on riding +50X this season.
No park experience, but plan to give it a try since I wont be landing on ice like out east.


So with that said, my first board was/is a Forum 154W Destroyer. (~5 stiffness) And while I love the board and I'm extremely comfortable on it carving down the mountain, I'm worried that it may be too small for me here in CO. I'll be riding "allmountain" style.... mainly carving slopes (and this weird thing y'all call "powder"), but like I said, I would like to play a little in the park and hit decent jumps.


For my weight/ riding style, I've gotten recommendations for everything from a 162-170... so obviously, my 154 is quite small... But is stability the only thing I'm compromising by riding a board too small? Is there a possibility I could break it (I haven't yet!)?? I'm looking at last years GNU's Rider's Choice board (~5 stiffness) and just need recommendations on where to go from here...
 

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The Swiss Miss
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You'll get contradictory answers here as well ;) but one thing is obvious: you'll submarine with this board in deep fluff with your stats. Hubby has 190lbs and rides boards around 164 for (not extremely deep) pow. If you want to enjoy pow and don't dig yourself out on flats and lean back all the time, you'll need a longer board (I ride a 158 freeride board having 120lbs for these reasons). And I'm pretty sure, as soon as you did the first turns in fluff, you want a board suitable for it. Enjoy! :thumbsup:
 

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^^^ this
And you will enjoy the stability of a longer board at high speed, if you just want to play around the 154 will be fine
 

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You'll get contradictory answers here as well ;) but one thing is obvious: you'll submarine with this board in deep fluff with your stats.
:thumbsup:

I'm about the same stats (6'2", 190) and I ride a 161 most of the time here on the Ice coast and a 164 on my trips out west. And for deep stuff, I wish I had something in the 168+ range. Aside from stability, you'll probably find that a longer board has increased edge hold due to the increase in effective edge.

You should also think about why so many people have a quiver of boards: different boards for different things. Why get another 154?
 

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Keep your little board for groomers and the park for now, unless you're a rabid speed demon it will be fine, and especially good for park, butters etc.

Demo a longer, powder oriented board on a day with good snow and see what you think. Then buy accordingly. Consider burton Sherlock as an all round board thats good in powder or fish or barracuda for powder specific.

Demo is your friend.
 

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You don't have to get a super long board. Nowadays there are so many different shapes & rockers that you can really get any size you want. Nugs & fishcuits are examples of shorter boards that float great in pow. You could get something like a wide smokin superpark ctx 159 & have great float - or get the Bon aire that comes out next year. Wide Sherlock is good too & the list goes on
 

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For my weight/ riding style, I've gotten recommendations for everything from a 162-170... so obviously, my 154 is quite small...
Hi Mayor,

The tip to tip cm length (162, 170, 154 from above) of a board in itself means very little in terms of performance. I would focus your comparisons on running length or effective edge.

Depending on how the manufacturer extends or blunts the raised tip/tail a much shorter board can "ride" longer than a much longer board. It is also very common for the "marketing length" of the actual product (the size printed on the board) to be far off from the actual board measurement. Take a tape measure to your current deck. You may be in for a good laugh :)

If possible let us know about the specific models that you are referring to / considering. That is the only way to make strong suggestions for you.

STOKED!
 

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If you think there isn't ice in the park here you are sadly mistaken. That shit is firm and I mean FIRM. I'm about 25 to 30lbs less than you. Would I recommend at your size you ride a 54 for powder? No it won't be the most ideal. Would I recommend a 62 to 170 oh fuck no.

Is the pow deep and going to weigh you down here? Nope it's probably the lightest in the country till mid March/April then it can get heavier.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
If you think there isn't ice in the park here you are sadly mistaken. That shit is firm and I mean FIRM.
Haha, I'm aware there is ice everywhere, but out east our home slopes (NC and WV)are so small and packed that it is literally like boarding on a slanted ice rink. Practicing park on SOLID ice is not ideal, and "powder days" consist usually of about 2in of wet slush... So I'm pretty excited for some descent pow, even if it does get firm, I guarantee that I wont complain. :)


Keep your little board for groomers and the park for now, unless you're a rabid speed demon it will be fine, and especially good for park, butters etc.

Demo a longer, powder oriented board on a day with good snow and see what you think. Then buy accordingly. Consider burton Sherlock as an all round board thats good in powder or fish or barracuda for powder specific.

Demo is your friend.
I enjoy speed, but even riding my 154 I feel comfortable and stable racing down the mountain, that why I'm curious if a larger board will even benefit me (stability wise)... or just slow my turns.
As far as demo-ing a board, how does that work? Do you just show up on the mountain a particular set day and test as many as you want?



You should also think about why so many people have a quiver of boards: different boards for different things. Why get another 154?
I'm not planning to get another small board. But building up an arsenal of boards IS my goal... I just need a starting point.




For those curious as to what boards I'm considering, I've looked at a 162W GNU's Rider's Choice for all mountain riding, and possibly a 169 Burton Barracuda for strictly powder. (Both are a ~5 flex)

Thoughts?
 

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I'm 185lb and only have one board longer than 156 that includes a couple of 52s that are a blast to ride and no real problem in powder. Just set the bindings back.
 

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The Swiss Miss
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As far as demo-ing a board, how does that work? Do you just show up on the mountain a particular set day and test as many as you want?
How it works here: If there's an official demo day with one or several brands, yes: show up, fill out a form, sometimes pay some bucks and demo whatever they have in stock. Good way to demo several boards and to get an idea on what you're looking for. But... you can't be sure that they'll have the model/size you seek. If you're interested in a specific model, it's worth to call the salesmen ahead to make sure that they'll bring this specific board.
Ask the brands for dates/places of demo days.

Or via shops. I buy my gear in local shops. It's a bit more expensive but it's give and take... if I'm interested in a board, I'll get it to demo cos they know that I'll buy it from them if I like it. If it's a shop you haven't been a customer before, it might be that they charge you for demoing (actually renting), but if you then buy the board, they refund this charge.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Or via shops. I buy my gear in local shops. It's a bit more expensive but it's give and take... if I'm interested in a board, I'll get it to demo cos they know that I'll buy it from them if I like it. If it's a shop you haven't been a customer before, it might be that they charge you for demoing (actually renting), but if you then buy the board, they refund this charge.
I'm new to CO so I don't have a "shop" here yet, but I'm sure I'll find one. Maybe I can become friends with an employee and get the hook-up. Thanks for the idea. :thumbsup:
 

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Where your gonna be riding?

I'm 280-290 lbs and rode a 162w in up to nipple deep pow.... No problem here..... I did buy a pow specific board for deeper days here this coming season though just to see the difference. I now have a pin tail 163. My 162 is a directional twin with a 1" setback though.

I am sure you would be just fine on a 157ish board for all mtn, use the old board for park days. Get a board you like, ride it ALOT and have a great season.
 

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Im 5'11" 245lbs (kinda heavy set) with a size 10 1/2 shoe. I ride a 157 for all mountain/park, and for any powder deep enough that i might have to dig out if i get stuck, i ride a 162 and set my bindings back.
 

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My boyfriend weighs about 210 and the board he's ridden most in the last few years is a fully cambered 159. Please note my location. He has bigger boards (up to a 172), and the split I got him is a hybrid rocker 166 because he's talked about getting a longer one when he got a split, but he's been riding that cambered deck just fine, even in fairly deep coastal pow, where you can really auger in if you sink it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Where your gonna be riding?...
I bought the "EPIC Local Pass" so it includes Keystone, A-basin, Breck, and 10 days at Vail and Beaver Creek... I'll probably do most of my riding at Keystone or A-basin because I have close friends from college that work there. But I WILL be going to all of them throughout this season. (First time out West, gotta go big!!)



Thanks for all the suggestions, peeps. I think I'll shoot for a 160-ish board just to be on the safe side. It seems as if most people here are suggesting within 3cm either way of that...
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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Thanks for all the suggestions, peeps. I think I'll shoot for a 160-ish board just to be on the safe side. It seems as if most people here are suggesting within 3cm either way of that...
You're getting a lot of people on one side of the spectrum here.

I'm the opposite. I weigh 175 and I learned on a 153. Went to a 159 and loved it. Went to a 160 with a MUCH longer effective edge and LOVED it. Went to a 156 play board (Burton Custom) the park and could hardly ride the thing. I've gotten used to it but I think once you try a bigger board you'll be much more happy with it!

Burton should have demo days in CO. Just show up, request a couple bigger boards (your weight should be in the low 160 range) and try them out. Then ride your 154 again and see what you feel...
 

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You're getting a lot of people on one side of the spectrum here.

I'm the opposite. I weigh 175 and I learned on a 153. Went to a 159 and loved it. Went to a 160 with a MUCH longer effective edge and LOVED it. Went to a 156 play board (Burton Custom) the park and could hardly ride the thing. I've gotten used to it but I think once you try a bigger board you'll be much more happy with it!

Burton should have demo days in CO. Just show up, request a couple bigger boards (your weight should be in the low 160 range) and try them out. Then ride your 154 again and see what you feel...

So you're suggesting to go bigger than suggested? I'm thinking that because I'm getting a WIDE board, that should give me the stability of a slightly longer board, correct? And for the GNU Rider's Choice, their website suggests purchasing (that particular board) 3cm shorter than "normal"... So I was looking at the 162W. Thoughts?
 
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