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So I've been reading this forum for a while and I've learned a lot of great stuff from the people here. One thing I've seen over and over is that it's really weight that should be the bigger determining factors of your board lengths choices and not height.

So, my wife was using a board (ride compact 138) that was rated at a max weight lower than she is. Trying to be helpful I bought a B-nice 151 that seemed more appropriate due to the Gnu weight and boot size recommendations but she's freaking out because it comes up to her forehead. To be fair, in this case the 148 also is the right weight range, it just wasn't available at the rock bottom price I found the 151 at.

She's still fairly new to the sport, so my thinking is that this should be a nice stable board for her to learn on - but is there a real disadvantage by having a board that's almost as tall as she is?

And no, I can't post her weight here for fear that at some point she will read this forum and eviscerate me.
 

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And no, I can't post her weight here for fear that at some point she will read this forum and eviscerate me.
:eusa_clap:

Quote of the day for sure.
 

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I outweighed the "recommended" range for my board by 30 lbs or so. It really doesn't matter that much, but it will certainly be harder for her to turn. Adding 10 cm on to a board is huge and it will certainly take some getting used to.

Just for reference, I'm 220 and can ride a 157 in almost any conditions except waist deep powder.

The B-nice is a flexy rocker board, so it won't be as bad as if you threw her on a stiff camber board, but depending on her weight, she could be fine.
 

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It is generally accepted that a smaller board (but still within the rider's weight range) is easier for beginners to learn on. Unfortunetly, without your gf's specs it's hard to give advice.
 

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It's really based on rider weight and riding style. For a beginner, go small/soft. She'll know when she's pushed the board to it's limit when she gets there. Then you can think about going longer/stiffer or whatever she's into at that point.
 

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I would say that it is more of a recommendation but does have some truth to it and a board that is legit too big for a rider does suck. Now a few cm's are not gonna matter all that much and I personally have rode boards on the "smaller" end of the recommended range and never had any issues and people will tell you with more length you get more stability and a shorter stick will get you more agility and control and for a beginner such as your wife this may be more beneficial at first. My stats if you would like to compare are 5'6" 120# and size 9 women's boot. I usually ride 144 but have a a 147 and 49. If she has a smaller foot you may want to make sure the width isn't too wide because that does also play into control. I rode a men's 153 rental when I was first starting out more than ten years ago when I was smaller and shorter and I remember it was horrible and huge and so heavy which is why I think I have a tendency to ride smaller boards.

Your girl going from a 138 to a 151 would be scary I think-138 seems tiny to me. If you didn't already pull the trigger on the board (or are able to return it) I would look around and see if you can get a deal on a smaller board. If she thinks it is too big before she even rides you may want to keep looking.

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A persons height can matter in different ways to riders based upon their level of skill and the type of riding they do, pipe, powder etc. And often over time it will become a personal preference.

For someone learning or just starting out it's important to have a board that will readily respond to their body mechanics so that they have success in learning how to properly steer, stop, and turn the board. Length and flex have a lot to do with that. You want a board with enough flex that they can use their body weight to get it to turn and respond, and something short enough that it doesn't exhaust them or become cumbersome on pitch. Look for a board that is short but has a decent length effective edge so that they are able to stop and feel safe at speed.

Up to her forehead is too long for someone at her stage. There are plenty of shorter boards with long effective edges.
 

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Keep her on the 138 for now until she's more confident. 142 might even work (bridge the gap).

One thing I know about women/girls on snow, if they're freaked out about anything, it's very rare for them to get over it and every difficulty, every fall, every hard edge catch take down will now be your fault.
 

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One thing I know about women/girls on snow, if they're freaked out about anything, it's very rare for them to get over it and every difficulty, every fall, every hard edge catch take down will now be your fault.
We have greater tendency towards self-preservation. ;)

But your observation isn't exactly a blanket statement of truth. Some of us girls still push hard and continue on.
 

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Hey Conrad,

Rider height does not matter at all. It should not be considered in your buying decision. The same is true of tip to tip board length (i.e. 148 cm) except in the case where you are comparing board sizes within a given model.

The size that she will want is entirely dependent on the model she is considering.

Kindly post up her weight and foot size (we won't tell). :) Without both of those pieces of info there is really no way to size her correctly for any given model.

STOKED!
 

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We have greater tendency towards self-preservation. ;)

But your observation isn't exactly a blanket statement of truth. Some of us girls still push hard and continue on.
Oh it was definitely a generalization. But she's already freaked out. Before trying it. I've got my spidey sense on this one.

My girl rode before I did so I didn't have to endure it. But I've seen enough buddies try to teach their girls ...

Going from 138 to 151 for a beginner ... that'll be tough.
 

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Weight ranges are (like many things) only a rule of thumb based on averages...
Take a sporty tall, a short chubby not so sporty, a small heavy-built marathon runner, and a lanky very tall girl, all 130lbs. Which ones will be rather able to handle the same board? Weight is only one of many variables.. do yourself a favor and get her a board she feels comfortable with :)
 

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Weight ranges are (like many things) only a rule of thumb based on averages...
Take a sporty tall, a short chubby not so sporty, a small heavy-built marathon runner, and a lanky very tall girl, all 130lbs.
Hi,

If the two (hypothetical) riders have the same foot size they will require exactly the same board size in any given model. Boards are designed based on weight and foot size. height is not considered at all in designing a snowboard.
 

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Hi,

If the two (hypothetical) riders have the same foot size they will require exactly the same board size in any given model. Boards are designed based on weight and foot size. height is not considered at all in designing a snowboard.
I agree, but they will given the different types of people all react differently due to the way the same weight moves over a board... ;) As a shorter stockier person will have a lower centre of gravity, however, that is something that could never truly be tested and advised on as you are only 1 weight and height... Haha
 

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4 hypothetical riders...
Hah! I has misunderstood your meaning. The same is true however. Riders of the same weight and same shoe size will be best fit by the same board in any given model.

I wrote this over 20 years ago (gag) and it is equally relevant today:

Where your nose is, does not determine what size of snowboard you should ride!

...or your chin, ears, shoulders or any other body part for that matter. These are the silliest rules for sizing boards that could possibly be imagined, and yet they persist. We hear new ones everyday, "my friend told me that a board should come to in between my chin and my nose." Why, are you planning to nibble on it? Buying based on these generalities is good way to end up with a completely inappropriate board. Why do such rules exist? It is due to the fact that finding the right board takes a bit of research and knowledge. The easy way, however incorrect, is much quicker. A snowboard reacts to only two factors, how much pressure is being applied to it (rider weight), and where that pressure is coming from (foot size and position). Boards are designed around riders of a certain weight range. The total weight range for a given board will be around 50 pounds (although manufacturers tend to exaggerate this range to make their products sellable to a wider variety of customers). Two men who stand six feet tall and whose noses are at identical heights, may be separated by 100 pounds of weight. This would change the boards that they should ride by two entire categories of stiffness and running length. You will also want to make sure that the board is appropriate for your foot size. Up to 1 centimeter of barefoot overhang for both the toe and heel sides (yes, overhang) off the edge of your board is ideal (when measured at the stance width and angle that you will ride). We will discuss this more below when we address width in detail.
 

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Hah! I has misunderstood your meaning. The same is true however. Riders of the same weight and same shoe size will be best fit by the same board in any given model.

I wrote this over 20 years ago (gag) and it is equally relevant today:

Where your nose is, does not determine what size of snowboard you should ride!

...or your chin, ears, shoulders or any other body part for that matter. These are the silliest rules for sizing boards that could possibly be imagined, and yet they persist. We hear new ones everyday, "my friend told me that a board should come to in between my chin and my nose." Why, are you planning to nibble on it? Buying based on these generalities is good way to end up with a completely inappropriate board. Why do such rules exist? It is due to the fact that finding the right board takes a bit of research and knowledge. The easy way, however incorrect, is much quicker. A snowboard reacts to only two factors, how much pressure is being applied to it (rider weight), and where that pressure is coming from (foot size and position). Boards are designed around riders of a certain weight range. The total weight range for a given board will be around 50 pounds (although manufacturers tend to exaggerate this range to make their products sellable to a wider variety of customers). Two men who stand six feet tall and whose noses are at identical heights, may be separated by 100 pounds of weight. This would change the boards that they should ride by two entire categories of stiffness and running length. You will also want to make sure that the board is appropriate for your foot size. Up to 1 centimeter of barefoot overhang for both the toe and heel sides (yes, overhang) off the edge of your board is ideal (when measured at the stance width and angle that you will ride). We will discuss this more below when we address width in detail.
But wouldn't height have at least some factor to play all else being equal? Particularly a comfortable stance width, I would think, would be determined somewhat by a person's height. That would impact where they place their bindings and how they would leverage the edges of the board, wouldn't it?

Also, I think neni's point is also such that a person's physical makeup can impact how well they might be able to handle a particular board. I'm sure that a taller, more athletic person would have an easier time handling and turning a board than a shorter, non-athletic couch potato of the same weight and footsize would, no?

I understand your point on foot size and weight being the primary determinants, but don't these other factors play in at least somewhat? Just curious about this. Thanks.
 

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Hi Trapper,

Height and rider preference (strangely, stance width varies much more by rider preference than by rider height) will affect the chosen stance width but that is more than covered by the insert options on any given model.

As for being in shape etc, it will certainly help in terms of overall riding but will not change ideal size in any given model.
 

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Hi Trapper,

Height and rider preference (strangely, stance width varies much more by rider preference than by rider height) will affect the chosen stance width but that is more than covered by the insert options on any given model.

As for being in shape etc, it will certainly help in terms of overall riding but will not change ideal size in any given model.
Interesting. I guess that makes sense as I am 6'5" and only go 23 inches on my board while I know people shorter than that that go wider. But I was always under the impression that I should widen my stance because of my height; guess not.
 

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Interesting. I guess that makes sense as I am 6'5" and only go 23 inches on my board while I know people shorter than that that go wider. But I was always under the impression that I should widen my stance because of my height; guess not.
Stance width is based on preference (and to a certain degree fashion) and it does not travel with rider height. Shoulder and hip width is a good indicator of comfortable stance width...but again, preference is king there.
 
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