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Has anyone experience with these?

https://www.drift-products.com/

I think they look really cool, like snowshoes but more fun, faster and more versatile. I havent tried splitboarding, but to me it looks expensive and a bit of work to actually use.
The point of splitboarding is to eliminate carrying extra gear. And these at $420 for a set make them crazy expensive and not much cheaper than a splitboard setup. Better snowshoe, not sure never having tried them at all, but that's basically all they appear to be. But at best that makes it the better of a bad, outdated choice for backcountry and at nearly 4x the price just so that it slides down hill......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree the price is insane, but I like the idea about a snowshoe one can use as a ski when its flat, and that I can use my normal board. Im curious. Can someone just make a cheaper version?
 

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I agree the price is insane, but I like the idea about a snowshoe one can use as a ski when its flat, and that I can use my normal board. Im curious. Can someone just make a cheaper version?
Can you make a flat board you can walk on yourself? Pretty easy. This are Carbon Fiber, great for weight reduction but probably way overkill if it raises the price to that. All you need is the skins which would probably be easier to just buy that material, then it'd be pretty easy to jerry-rig the rest of it to an extent.

By looks though I could probably build one of these only making the board only partially carbon fiber with a thin layer of another material as fill and all in be iin less around $100 but eh, not really worth the effort for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Can you make a flat board you can walk on yourself? Pretty easy. This are Carbon Fiber, great for weight reduction but probably way overkill if it raises the price to that. All you need is the skins which would probably be easier to just buy that material, then it'd be pretty easy to jerry-rig the rest of it to an extent.

By looks though I could probably build one of these only making the board only partially carbon fiber with a thin layer of another material as fill and all in be iin less around $100 but eh, not really worth the effort for me.
I would think the bindings have some research and tech behind it. You make, I buy?
 

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I would think the bindings have some research and tech behind it. You make, I buy?
Ha, probably not worth it for either of us. But those bindings are nothing more than a small metal bracket on a pin hinge with literally a cloth buckle and strap. The Expensive parts would just be the layer of carbon fiber. You can buy bulk rolls of skin material for cheap. Glue that to any flat board and then throw on like an old binding base or something, screw a pin to it and boom you have one of these.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would rather eat garbage for 2 months and buy a pair than try to make them myself. One thing I do want to try make is a bindingless powsurfboard though, so please share some tips on that (maybe in another thread)

But, to get back on track. Has anyone experience with the Drift boards?
 

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I would rather eat garbage for 2 months and buy a pair than try to make them myself. One thing I do want to try make is a bindingless powsurfboard though, so please share some tips on that (maybe in another thread)

But, to get back on track. Has anyone experience with the Drift boards?
Goodride has a pretty in depth review

I feel similar that I'd almost rather put that 400$ toward a splitboard setup, depends how comfortable hiking with a board on your back is. With a proper snowboard pack maybe it's not so bad. They also might be worth having just to replace snowshoes in any snow hiking, unrelated to snowboarding.
 

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Goodride has a pretty in depth review

I feel similar that I'd almost rather put that 400$ toward a splitboard setup, depends how comfortable hiking with a board on your back is. With a proper snowboard pack maybe it's not so bad. They also might be worth having just to replace snowshoes in any snow hiking, unrelated to snowboarding.
Yup their only real use is to replace snow shoes for people who are big in to that. Hiking with a board is tiring and SUPER annoying even with the best pack. But for big time snow hikers with cash burning a hole intheir pocket MAYBE. although having to put crampons n and take them off is another huge flaw with the design. I dont want to have to attach a crampon while hiking a steep or icy section, then take them off to go down a tiny downslope, then put them back on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yup their only real use is to replace snow shoes for people who are big in to that. Hiking with a board is tiring and SUPER annoying even with the best pack. But for big time snow hikers with cash burning a hole intheir pocket MAYBE. although having to put crampons n and take them off is another huge flaw with the design. I dont want to have to attach a crampon while hiking a steep or icy section, then take them off to go down a tiny downslope, then put them back on.
Yeah, it depends on what kind of use you want it for also. Living in Norway I don`t picture myself hiking all day / for days to steep mountaintops on icy days. I`d just like to have the opportunity to ride some powder on hills or tops that maybe takes an hour or two of hiking. An option to paying the lift ticket, getting away from crowds and into nature and still ride pow. Or an option to cross county skiing but more fun, with better views and with a reward in the end (riding down). I`m not into snowshoes, in fact I can only remember to have tried it once. But I already have a Gregory Targhee 45 backpack which I use for hiking in summer and autumn, cross country-skiing etc, which luckily seems to be designed for carrying a snowboard.

Splitboarding just seems to "serious" for my intended use, overkill. If I spend 1000 - 1500 on a splitboard rig, I think each trip I make good use of it would be really expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
They look fine for shallow slope and minimal snow, but for anything serious...no. Btw a coworker has basically the same thing from 20 years ago...with some crampons
Ok, whats the name of this product?

I have no experience with skins either, how good or bad is the grip uphill and glide downhill on something like this? Do they need maintainance? It seems like the boards are made for going straight up and not sideways, so they should have ok grip.

Im thinking in 30 cm powder f. ex., how Steep a hill will the Drift boards manage going up, contra will I gain enough speed going down the same hill on a snowboard.. Hmm.. I think they are too expensive to take a chance on without trying for me at the moment.
 

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Ok, whats the name of this product?

I have no experience with skins either, how good or bad is the grip uphill and glide downhill on something like this? Do they need maintainance? It seems like the boards are made for going straight up and not sideways, so they should have ok grip.

Im thinking in 30 cm powder f. ex., how Steep a hill will the Drift boards manage going up, contra will I gain enough speed going down the same hill on a snowboard.. Hmm.. I think they are too expensive to take a chance on without trying for me at the moment.
I have no idea, he brought them in to show me and wondered if I'd buy them for $80...no frick'n way.

Grip going uphill depends on slope, snow conditions and skill....idk for the drifts...maybe at the steepest 25 degrees...just realise that they are short and thus perhaps do not have the surface area (and camber) for the skins to grip compared to AT skis or splitboards. Which also is true for edge/traversing edging going up (and for that matter down).

The only case that these things are perhaps better at is flat land moving compared to snow shoes...and maybe for short distance low angle laps (100 yards/meters) to hit some natty drop. But then you could also use "Verts" to go up steeper laps.

As for snow conditions...if over 30 cm...these might not have much float, and snow caving in back on top of them might be an issue if the snow is heavy.

Thus imho...the window that these might be useful...the window is pretty small...like using them in a non mountainous Midwest bc area...golf course/corn field.
 

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Some people around here use these:

https://algonquinoutfitters.com/product/altai-hok-skis-389-98/

They're basically a hybrid between a ski and a snowshoe (with integrated skins), but I think more for long distance snowshoeing across relatively flat terrain (frozen lakes etc.).

If your goal is to snowboard, and you're wanting more than short lines / drops etc. I would agree that a split-board / AT set-up is really the best option

Not sure where you're located, but sometimes you can get a used set-up for a decent price
 

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I know I’m late to this conversation but thought I’d give my two cents. I’ve used the drift boards and have some shipping to me right now. I was super skeptical at first but they are legit. Much more capable than the assumptions made in this thread. Unless it gets really steep and really hard, these things do fine. They do best in existing skin tracks on average slopes, but they can break fresh snow and go up some pretty steep stuff. Yes they’re expensive, but they are crazy light on your feet and your back. They allow you to ride whatever snowboard you like and are much easier to change over than a split board. Another thing to consider is that when it comes to energy expenditure, weight on your back is much more efficient than weight on your feet. So it’s actually much better to carry your board on your back. It can be annoying in thick trees or high wind, but other than that it’s fine. Anyway, it’s not meant to be “better” than split boards, but a solid alternative for people who want to use a quiver of boards in the backcountry. For me, they’re all I’m using. No split board.
 

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I wouldn't bother unless you know you are using skin/cat tracks that go straight uphill, and walk on flats most of the time. They will be like using snowshoes when the snow is deep anyways, and sidehilling isn't exactly better because they are so wide.

Get these: https://www.stigasports.com/eu/micro-blade-mini-skis-black
Finding some used skinbits and gluing them on shouldn't be hard.
 

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I wouldn't bother unless you know you are using skin/cat tracks that go straight uphill, and walk on flats most of the time. They will be like using snowshoes when the snow is deep anyways, and sidehilling isn't exactly better because they are so wide.

Get these: https://www.stigasports.com/eu/micro-blade-mini-skis-black
Finding some used skinbits and gluing them on shouldn't be hard.
Have you used them? Because that’s just not accurate. And suggesting those toy things as an alternative... I trust that’s a joke. The pivoting binding and the heel risers are an essential part of function. Anyway, like I said I was skeptical and made all the same assumptions but after using them I changed my tune. Here’s a solid review from the Good Ride that hits the benefits and drawbacks.
Happy Thanksgiver!
 

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K2 used to sell clicker approach skis that were some micro skis kinda like those stigas. Honestly, I've been dreaming about making a split powsurfer in the old wood shop. Micro approach skis would be even easier to make. Splitboarding really calls to me, but Colorado has gnarly avalanche conditions a lot of the time. Maybe a pow surfer split can keep me in the low angle trees and out of the high avy risk areas. Then I can try some longer approaches with a resort board on my back later in the spring. I've done mountaineering approaches in snowshoes, and anything that can glide has to be way better than that.
 

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Korua Dart 160 | Bataleon Magic Carpet 156W | Lobster Aaron Schwartz (Party Wave) 148
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Any updates on the drift boards? Looking to do all my avy courses and start getting into the backcountry in the next year or two, but the idea of a splitboard really doesn't appeal to me. As far as I can tell, splitboards ride much worse than solid snowboards, but cost a lot more. Are the drift boards actually a viable alternative to splitboarding, and will I be able to somewhat keep up with friends on splitboards or skis? I really like the idea of being able to take my existing solids into the backcountry, and the money I'd save on not buying a splitboard setup could just go towards buying another regular board (or two)!
 
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