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Yeah again, I wouldn't think about this in terms of building confidence with speed itself. It's not that you have the skills necessary to snowboard fast, but just can't get over an irrational fear. It's that you lack the skills required to snowboard fast; the fear is completely rational. Focus on filling your skill gaps, and trust that when you fill those gaps, confidence at speed will follow.

Quotes below make me lean towards edge control as a likely culprit, especially the bit about narrow paths. But snowboarding is hyper-technical so it's probably a few things all coming together. Best advice would be to take a lesson to figure out what needs cleaning up.

Steep and ice are the most scary.

I just need to better guess the radius of my curve so that I can know when there is enough space.

Also I am scared in narrow paths, where you have the mountain on one side and a (not skiable) slope on the other. Usually, those parts are crowded so it is difficult x2.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Lessons are on their way. I am already putting away money for that purpose. I need to understand how I can find a good ski\snowboard school with good teachers (only meaningful way to get lessons here). Since I am very far from snowboarder stereotype, I had bad experience with instructors.

I guess I can find videos on edge control.
 

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Since I am very far from snowboarder stereotype, I had bad experience with instructors.
What does that mean?

I guess I can find videos on edge control.
Are you skidding from edge to edge, or do you sometimes tilt the board and ride along the edge instead? Can you ride "straight" easily, or do you struggle to feel in control unless your board is sideways relative to the fall line?
 

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What does that mean?
Probably that previous lessons were a lot like the ones in South Park and the stoner snowboard instructor is not that good at helping the adult woman out with constructive advice that's meaningful to her? "Take lessons" is good advice when good instructors are available, but many times if you're not one of the cool kids they don't know how to relate to you or communicate effectively. My wife wasted a bunch of time and money in group lessons that way and came away from them thinking she'd never be able to snowboard.

Reading between the lines, it sounds like speed isn't a problem at all and basic riding mechanics are. That was a big problem for my wife at first - she wasn't turning correctly and thought that the problem was she was just afraid/didn't want to go fast. If you'd tell her what she was doing wrong, she'd say "I'm doing that; I don't need to go that fast. I'm fine." To her, she thought that everyone was frustrated with her slow speed and was trying to get her to speed up by doing unsafe things. But mostly you'd watch her and cringe because she was stiff-legged and on the verge of catching an edge quite often. After she got better, she got a lot faster.
 

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Reading this it sounds like you have a lack in confidence in your own skills. And that could be justified. You seem to be more afraid of not being able to get out of a situation than the danger of speed itself. I suspect you get really nervous on cat trails that are crowded where you may need to swerve around people or when you see a giant snake of kids in a ski class coming where you aren't sure you are able to get out of their way when they decide to change course for no good reason at all.

I'm not real sure how to explain what I mean, at some level you want to be able to throw your board around to make it do what you want it to do as opposed to having it and its speed take you on a ride where it wants to naturally go. This lets you muscle your way and control stick situations. No idea if that makes any sense.

Experience and practice is what this needs. You need to get to a point where throwing the board around isn't as cumbersome. Can you do 180 bunny hops on your board?

Or I'm totally wrong :)
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Probably that previous lessons were a lot like the ones in South Park and the stoner snowboard instructor is not that good at helping the adult woman out with constructive advice that's meaningful to her?
Like this. My first 2 hours on a snowboard: my friend and me, two 30yo girls. When instructor saw us, immediately called his friend. Then they both teach us how to do some sliding at the bottom of a green run. They we're mainly talking and try to look cool with us. That's all for 2h of lesson.

I am sure I have to improve in almost everything. I have only one picture of me snowboarding this year and if I post it, I bet you can find tons of errors in my riding position. Only looking at one picture. And I agree in all of that. I see many issues myself. I need to ride, I want to ride and 8 months are a long time to wait.
 

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Like this. My first 2 hours on a snowboard: my friend and me, two 30yo girls. When instructor saw us, immediately called his friend. Then they both teach us how to do some sliding at the bottom of a green run. They we're mainly talking and try to look cool with us. That's all for 2h of lesson.

I am sure I have to improve in almost everything. I have only one picture of me snowboarding this year and if I post it, I bet you can find tons of errors in my riding position. Only looking at one picture. And I agree in all of that. I see many issues myself. I need to ride, I want to ride and 8 months are a long time to wait.
Next lesson request a female instructor. For more than just the above I think it'd be beneficial. They'll be looking at your form for the right reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Are you skidding from edge to edge, or do you sometimes tilt the board and ride along the edge instead? Can you ride "straight" easily, or do you struggle to feel in control unless your board is sideways relative to the fall line?
I hope I don't get lost in translation. I am skidding when I do turns. Sometimes I ride along the edge but only when I am crossing the fall line and I am uncomfortable doing that (whaat? This board can go so smootly? I will never cope with that).
I feel in control when my board is 90 degrees wrt fall line. I can ride straight, and I do feel stable, but in this case my negative thinking kicks in and I don't do it for long before 'braking'.

So fear + inexperience.
 

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Being comfortable in your boots, bindings, stance, and board means a lot for improving.

Having a good mood (often improves on a good day), the right amount of clothing, and unrestrictive clothing is important, baggy and/or stretchy, and of course good visibility makes everything alot easier when riding, so use those good days for getting better.

You need those important muscles for balance up and running, and a board you can muscle around. You use your bodyweight alot for this, but the muscles in you lower leg and around the knee need to be solid to transfer the forces. Walking uphill and biking plus doing situps and static leg exercises helps alot, you need to fine tune and keep the pressure up for minutes at a time to be able to carve well.

Just try balancing on the edges when you get good conditions, it comes naturally after awhile, but it won't come if you don't try. Stop awhile, look at where you want to go and try it, stop again and look uphill at your tracks. Don't worry about getting down the hill, it's not a race. Some of my friends are in such a hurry getting down, and talk about all they can't do. When I ask them if they ever tried, the answer is usually no.
 

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I hope I don't get lost in translation. I am skidding when I do turns. Sometimes I ride along the edge but only when I am crossing the fall line and I am uncomfortable doing that (whaat? This board can go so smootly? I will never cope with that).
I feel in control when my board is 90 degrees wrt fall line. I can ride straight, and I do feel stable, but in this case my negative thinking kicks in and I don't do it for long before 'braking'.

So fear + inexperience.
Nope, this is very clear. One thing you'll want to get a feel for is how to consistently ride along your edges. Just like you do now when you traverse across the fall line, but what you want is to be able to do it pointing down or at least nearer to down the fall line as well. You can get a feel for this pretty quickly if you're already linking turns. Just put a small amount of pressure into the toe edge by pushing your shins forward. The board will tilt slightly onto that edge and you'll ride pretty much straight along it. Repeat on heel edge by sticking your butt back like you're starting to sit in a chair.

Practice this on the gentlest slope you can to get a feel for it. Increase and decrease the amount of tilt and notice what happens (you'll turn in the direction you tilt more the more you tilt). Getting decent at this will help you conquer only feeling in control when your board is 90 degrees to the fall line, which will be a huge step towards getting confident at speed and will make navigating narrow sections a breeze. This can also be parlayed into actual carving once you get better at it, which is super fun :) IMO you can kiss flat basing goodbye completely until much later in your progression.

This won't make you a speed demon overnight, but it's an important hurdle to get past and for me made we WAY faster as soon as it clicked.
 

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Try getting comfortable riding on edges at low speed before moving onto riding at highspeed.
The conundrum is that riding on edge is actually easier at higher speed-- at least "higher" relative to the speeds beginners are moving. Same way that medium-sized jumps are generally easier to clear than most progression or small sized jumps. Steeper run-ins, better defined transition, better built lip and landing, and easier timing (plus less chance of a clueless jerry loitering in the landing after wiping out). Problem is that even though physics make the slightly bigger stuff technically easier, bigger stuff comes with higher consequences and a lot greater intimidation factor.
 

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I am skidding when I do turns. Sometimes I ride along the edge but only when I am crossing the fall line and I am uncomfortable doing that (whaat? This board can go so smootly? I will never cope with that).
Take the following advice with a grain of salt, because, as they say, if your only tool is a hammer, every problem tends to look like a nail. And what with me being into carving … anyway, here goes:
It sounds like you are not comfortable at speed because you do not trust your board. Which is another why of saying you do not trust your technique. And in my not-so-humble opinion, the basis of technique is how to skid and how to carve. If you have that down, confidence at speed will follow.
Since you are in Italy, I recommend you try to hook up with the Pure Boarding crowd for a day or two. They are basically hardbooters, but they are super nice and will welcome you no matter which boots you prefer.
 

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Yeah sounds like you just need to refine technique. Speed will come. As above best places to practice are low angle runs. Go fast on those. Steep and ice makes everyone’s sphincter tighten. Don’t try steeps on icy days. Cherry pick blacks on soft or fresh snow days.

Personally I ride mostly black runs but find that practicing my technique is best on greens and blues at lower speed.
 

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Repetition is what conquers fear. There is no way around that.
This. Sometimes I think ppl forget that snowboarding is a sports. As cool as it is... in one thing it's like any other sports, or activity in general: you only get better by repetition/exersise.

Exercise can be fun, sure. Fun is important. but getting better can be part of that fun experience, too. It's up to anyone how fast he wants to progress, if at all. But in the end, progress only comes with time on slope and exercising the things one want to achieve.

There are no shortcuts only because snowboarding is cool n fun n whatnot ;). Muscles have to learn the motions, mind has to learn the moves, body has to learn the balance. We've all been there (and continuously are) :)
 

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Just browsing the thread and adding my two cents: 1) more weight on front foot to help control chatter/ front end flop and get out of the back seat. I'm working on it too.

Umh- crashing can hurt. I'm not even going there.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Today I put my feet on a skateboard: fear of falling at 1 000 000, very depressing. I don't know if it makes sense to find a very easy progression on a skateboard to approach this big fear.
 

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Today I put my feet on a skateboard: fear of falling at 1 000 000, very depressing. I don't know if it makes sense to find a very easy progression on a skateboard to approach this big fear.
Skating is scarier imo. Snowboarding always seemed easier to me because I was coming from skateboarding. So much of the fear was gone, because falling on snow is 1000x better than falling on asphalt. Falling at speed on a skateboard gives you terrible road rash unless you're in a motorcycle suit. Falling at speed on a snowboard is generally better than falling at slow speeds, because the force of the impact is dissipated into the slide. I'll slide out at 30 or 40 miles an hour as I push my high speed carving. It doesn't hurt at all unless you slide into something.

That said, you've got the ability to bail on a skateboard. Being strapped in took some getting used to. I think skateboard training is great for balance and weight distribution. I do it all summer just because it's a good time. Longobards are much less intimidating. Generally speaking, the longer the board, the more stable it will be with the trade off of lower turning ability. Bigger wheels roll over more obstacles as well.

I've thought about how to teach people how to fall properly. It's important to retrain your instincts. Maybe Judo would be good because they throw each other on the mat a lot. Skateboarding is an effective tool for throwing yourself at the ground as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
Better learn how to fall...first...especially on a skate board...on a snowboard, you generally don't turn into hamburger.
I tried to read and watch something online, but its an elusive topic, so I'd really like to have some relevant links.
 
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