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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I've recently taken up snowboarding and I'm hooked so I'm looking to buy my first board.

I was originally looking at getting the Burton Process Flying V (159) as I heard its good for turn initiation and a soft playful board. However, I've heard it's not the best as an all mountain board as it struggles to hold an edge.

I was therefore looking at the Never Summer Proto Type Two (160) as an all mountain board. I know this is not geared to beginners, however I know I will develop quickly and should be able to fit into it.

I therefore have a few questions:

1) Should I get the Burton Process for now and then look for a new board in a years time?
2) Should I just get the Proto Type Two which will last me for many years as I will only be boarding around 2 weeks per year?
3) Am I looking at the correct size? I'm 6ft 4" around 200 lbs. My instructor told me its better to have a shorter board rather than longer.

I want a board that can do everything over the mountain, but I do think I would like to get into park as well.

Any advice would be great.
Thanks!
 

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Hello, and welcome to the forums.

First of all, the size of your foot is more important than your height.
Second, I don't know about the Proto but I think you'll squash that Process.
Third, what conditions are you usually ride? I've only tried a Process FV once and it was absolute junk for carving in firm/icy conditions.
Fourth, and most importantly, make sure you have appropriate, and correctly sized and fitted snowboard boots. It's the #1 mistake of snowboarders.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hello, and welcome to the forums.

First of all, the size of your foot is more important than your height.
Second, I don't know about the Proto but I think you'll squash that Process.
Third, what conditions are you usually ride? I've only tried a Process FV once and it was absolute junk for carving in firm/icy conditions.
Fourth, and most importantly, make sure you have appropriate, and correctly sized and fitted snowboard boots. It's the #1 mistake of snowboarders.
Thanks for your reply. My foot is size 9 uk (10 us). I have already purchased adidas samba boots which fit great. Now looking for that ideal board. My thinking is that as I will be boarding for max 2 weeks a year I’d rather have a board that will last me a long time as I develop and will not have to change to quickly
 

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Thanks for your reply. My foot is size 9 uk (10 us). I have already purchased adidas samba boots which fit great. Now looking for that ideal board. My thinking is that as I will be boarding for max 2 weeks a year I’d rather have a board that will last me a long time as I develop and will not have to change to quickly
Ugh oah, tell tail sign that they're probably too big. Do you wear sneakers in 9UK (10us)? If so, your boot is probably closer to size 9 US. Check out one of the boot fitting threads to make sure before you buy a board.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your reply. My foot is size 9 uk (10 us). I have already purchased adidas samba boots which fit great. Now looking for that ideal board. My thinking is that as I will be boarding for max 2 weeks a year I’d rather have a board that will last me a long time as I develop and will not have to change to quickly
Ugh oah, tell tail sign that they're probably too big. Do you wear sneakers in 9UK (10us)? If so, your boot is probably closer to size 9 US. Check out one of the boot fitting threads to make sure before you buy a board.
I wear size 9.5 uk so these are half size smaller. When I say they fit great I mean my toes are touching the end so I’m expecting them to pack out over time. I did all the research before I bought the boots so I’m happy with them! I know I don’t need a wide board to go with my boots too. Just more unsure about length
 

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Huge factor here is WHERE you're riding it. If you're east-coast where ice is a pretty normal thing to see... I'd steer far away from the flying-v. Angry Snowboarder pretty much said it's a cool shape, but if it's icy at all - you're in for a day of misery. I've also seen that at Stowe, they'll toss rental people on flying-v's when conditions are great, but instantly push people to customs as soon as it's super-cold icy. If you're a west-coast rider though... this is all probably a non-issue.

It seems the PTT has bite on ice and a lot of people here on the east coast like it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm actually based in Europe and have only previously ski'd (before taking up boarding) in the Alps where I've had mixed condiitons. However, when I do eventually venture over to the USA/Canada, I plan on going to Whistler. By the sounds of it the PTT will handle varied conditions better and different styles of boarding.
 

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Hi All,

I've recently taken up snowboarding and I'm hooked so I'm looking to buy my first board.

I was originally looking at getting the Burton Process Flying V (159) as I heard its good for turn initiation and a soft playful board. However, I've heard it's not the best as an all mountain board as it struggles to hold an edge.

I was therefore looking at the Never Summer Proto Type Two (160) as an all mountain board. I know this is not geared to beginners, however I know I will develop quickly and should be able to fit into it.

I therefore have a few questions:

1) Should I get the Burton Process for now and then look for a new board in a years time?
2) Should I just get the Proto Type Two which will last me for many years as I will only be boarding around 2 weeks per year?
3) Am I looking at the correct size? I'm 6ft 4" around 200 lbs. My instructor told me its better to have a shorter board rather than longer.

I want a board that can do everything over the mountain, but I do think I would like to get into park as well.

Any advice would be great.
Thanks!
Both those boards are so similar in many respects that it will make no difference for you. There are some small differences (Burton has better construction/durability, etc) but frankly they're too minor to worry about.
Many people will say about both that they don't hold an edge on ice, but that it is really a technique issue not a limitation of the boards - if you achieve proper edge angle they will hold just fine.

Sizewise you're about right: Definitely 160 for the NS. For the Burton you could go 158 or 162.
 

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I'm not really a fan of the flying-v. Why not considering the Type2 and the Process camber? With the spooned nose, the Process camber is not exactly hard to ride.
 

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There's also their PurePop Camber too... Process Off-Axis has it now (being retired this year) as well as the Trick Pony. Both the Process and Name Dropper are getting it in 19.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the replies. Unfortunately they don't have the other versions of the process in my size (I'm looking at a specific website in the UK which has a sale). My concern about the PTT is that as a beginner it may hinder my development as it's geared more towards advanced riders. Thoughts on this?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Process Flying V + burton cartel est bindings will be £400

PTT + union force bindings will be £600.

Is it worth paying the extra £200 for a board which I will probably keep for longer? Or would the process be a board I could also keep for a long time as a 1 quiver board?
 

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Thanks for all the replies. Unfortunately they don't have the other versions of the process in my size (I'm looking at a specific website in the UK which has a sale). My concern about the PTT is that as a beginner it may hinder my development as it's geared more towards advanced riders. Thoughts on this?
Not at all. It's a very versatile board, great for progressing with and not at all aggressive. Especially for dealing with ice, I'd take the PTT over the process any day. I'm not a fan of flying V at all, but Neversummers Ripsaw profile and their sidecuts provide much better grip for a hybrid profile.
 

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I ride quite often the PTT in the alps and had zero issues with edge hold (or lack thereof). As a beginner you might find the Funslinger a bit easier to handle but all NS boards are ok for beginners. From Burton, I'd rather have the Burton Kilroy - I really like their camber boards with soft to medium flex. They are a ton of fun but not as accessible as NS decks.

And forget the idea of owning just one board. If you're hooked, you'll want more. It's a disease ...
 

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Proto TT without a question. I've owned that Process FV. They look like similar boards on paper but not really. Proto whoops azzz! better on hard pack too.
 

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I rode a mates PTT this week and found it a really easy board to use. Bearing in mind I'm 5'7" 155lbs and his board was a 161W it was still easier to transition edge to edge than all but one of my smaller camber and flat boards (146cm - 161cm).
 

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Process Flying V + burton cartel est bindings will be £400

PTT + union force bindings will be £600.

Is it worth paying the extra £200 for a board which I will probably keep for longer? Or would the process be a board I could also keep for a long time as a 1 quiver board?
Ore those two really your only options?
 

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I once recommended the type two to two beginners at a demo. it was too much board for them and I might of scar'd both of them from riding.. the snowtrooper would be a better choice for growth.

depending on the conditions, (I'm surprised to read what I'm currently typing...) I'd go for the process Flying V and replace it later.

don't get the est bindings as that'll limit your board choices later if you decide to switch boards in the future as it'll limit you to channel boards. if you can get Re:Flex cartel bindings go for that. otherwise get force bindings.

you really don't have any other choices? like a rome garage rocker or some sort of R-flat-R profile?
 

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I once recommended the type two to two beginners at a demo. it was too much board for them and I might of scar'd both of them from riding.. the snowtrooper would be a better choice for growth.
WTH are you talking about??? How could a Proto possibly be too much board for anybody?
 

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WTH are you talking about??? How could a Proto possibly be too much board for anybody?
seriously, that's what I thought too. the 2 kids who came back on them were shook cus they kept eating it too much. sometimes we overthink the ease of boarding.

I know it sounds like bullshit, but it's not.
 
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