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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, sorry to post again about the same topic. I have been doing more research on this whole "flat camber" (with rockered tips) and most people say it is only really good for park use, especially rails. I like to ride more all mountain and am wondering if a flat camber board would be able to do that. The reason i'm asking this question again is because I have the opportunity to return the board I have right now (flat camber k2 Parkstar with rockered tips) so i'm just wondering if that is the right thing to do, or should i keep it?

Thanks
 

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Hey guys, sorry to post again about the same topic. I have been doing more research on this whole "flat camber" (with rockered tips) and most people say it is only really good for park use, especially rails. I like to ride more all mountain and am wondering if a flat camber board would be able to do that. The reason i'm asking this question again is because I have the opportunity to return the board I have right now (flat camber k2 Parkstar with rockered tips) so i'm just wondering if that is the right thing to do, or should i keep it?

Thanks
as far as flat rocker, you will be fine with all mountain. with flat you have a lot of effective edge and with the rocker tip, you will get some powder float, if you ride powder, it will also be more forgiving. the downside is that flat rocker is not as lively.

as far as the parkstar i can't comment on the board as i have not ridden it. but the profile itself is fine for all mountain.
I have 2 boards that fit that profile
sims protocol
marhar throwback
and they do just fine
 

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Discussion Starter #4
as far as flat rocker, you will be fine with all mountain. with flat you have a lot of effective edge and with the rocker tip, you will get some powder float, if you ride powder, it will also be more forgiving. the downside is that flat rocker is not as lively.

as far as the parkstar i can't comment on the board as i have not ridden it. but the profile itself is fine for all mountain.
I have 2 boards that fit that profile
sims protocol
marhar throwback
and they do just fine
Ok thanks, this board I have is all flat with just a little bit of rocker at tip and tail, it is also quite stiff. Is the "liveliness" a really big deal? and will I still be able to do butters and presses?
 

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Ok thanks, this board I have is all flat with just a little bit of rocker at tip and tail, it is also quite stiff. Is the "liveliness" a really big deal? and will I still be able to do butters and presses?
check out BA's review of an older version of this board
K2 Parkstar with Formula's my take - The Angry Snowboarder

you might want to ping BA at his site to get more info on newer version

but for those two items i think you will be ok
 

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In this case I would say the camber profile is not going to limit you as much as the flex of the board, being that it is a park oriented ride.
There are some pretty solid 'flat-rocker' all-mountain decks such as the turbo dream and rome mod rocker, so it's not going to be the shape that holds you back it will be the flex and other board characteristics like length and dampening.
Also the board shouldn't really feel stiff to you unless you aren't all that strong or the board is on the longer side, only true way to tell if it will be suited to you is by riding it. If you want an all-mountain board and the option is there to trade it or sell it, then that's probably what I would do.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In this case I would say the camber profile is not going to limit you as much as the flex of the board, being that it is a park oriented ride.
There are some pretty solid 'flat-rocker' all-mountain decks such as the turbo dream and rome mod rocker, so it's not going to be the shape that holds you back it will be the flex and other board characteristics like length and dampening.
Also the board shouldn't really feel stiff to you unless you aren't all that strong or the board is on the longer side, only true way to tell if it will be suited to you is by riding it. If you want an all-mountain board and the option is there to trade it or sell it, then that's probably what I would do.
Thanks for the information. I would say this board is a 7/10 stiffness, do you think that is too much to be able to do general tricks? I want a board that is stable, but still gives a little do do some tricks. As far as quality goes I believe it has most of the bells and whistles and it is a fairly new model.
 

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Based on your other post I'm guessing this is your first board? Profile shape, liveliness, flex, etc are all personal preference that you won't develop until you have a season or two under your belt. And as other posters have mentioned there are a number of other factors involved in a boards performance beyond just the the profile, but flat/rocker is fairly versatile. As long as it's sized correctly and you got a good deal on the board I'd say keep it. Don't overthink things until you have enough experience to know what you're looking for performance wise. Just keep things as inexpensive as possible and upgrade down the road.
 

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Because you like to ride more all mountain and have the option to return it, I suggest you return it and get a board that has some camber in it and is more designed for all mountain riding. Like a CRC or RCR that is a directional twin with a medium-medium/stiff flex. Flat with rocker tips will be great for learning to link turns and/or anything park/jib but it won't ride as well all mountain as a board meant for it with some camber. When you start to pick your speed up and ride hard pack or ice you'll really appreciate having a board with some camber and contact points.

My two cents.
 

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Thanks for the information. I would say this board is a 7/10 stiffness, do you think that is too much to be able to do general tricks? I want a board that is stable, but still gives a little do do some tricks. As far as quality goes I believe it has most of the bells and whistles and it is a fairly new model.
Well a 7/10 is quite subjective. According to various reviews and K2's own marketing of the board the flex is on the softer side of that... It sounds like you don't have a lot of experience on other boards so I would caution establishing a flex value to a board using the hand-test or carpet test...
The K2 turbo dream I would rate as a 7/10 (from riding it and comparing it to others), and that is a very solid all-mountain flat camber deck, one that I was able to do many 'general tricks' on, and was certainly stable enough although not great with edge hold on hard pack.
Your board will not have great edge hold, and it will very likely feel slightly unstable at high speeds (35 mph +) as well as likely have some chatter. It will however be beginner/novice friendly and forgiving when learning presses, jibs and small to medium jumps.
Overall, you're not going to know any difference between this and any number of boards you have not tried, so I would say get out there and ride it and if you hate it then look for something else.
 

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I've ridden the K2 Parkstar for the past 4 or 5 years and is the board I currently ride. I can assure you it's a whole lot softer than a 7/10 unless they stiffened it up a lot since 2013. I'd say my board was about a 4/5 out of 10 new and now about a 3. This board is perfect for what I do, granted I ride Midwest on hills about 700 feet and smaller with a good amount of park, so if you're intended uses are different than mine, I can't comment on it's performance. Mine is really easy to press/butter and is pretty flexible torsionally, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Alright thanks for the info guys. I was just guessing on the stiffness it might be a little less stiff.
 

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I had a parkstar a couple of years ago and hated it. It felt like a plank to me, I didn't like the side cut on it either. It was the year they stiffened it up. I would way rather be on a flow era, westmark, actually almost any other board i have ridden. It was one of my least favorite boards ever.

The good news if you keep it, is that it is stiff enough for all meowntain (assuming its similar to the one i rode), the rocker is minimal so it is very stable if you like to bomb.

I don't like it, others do. Do what you think is best.
 

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Flat camber IMO is probably the least ideal all mountain camber shape. That and banana rocker. Just because it's stiff doesn't mean it'll be good for general purposes. Do yourself a favor and pick up a YES basic. A solid all mountain performer at an introductory price. Look on sierratradingpost, plenty there for super discounted price.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Based on your other post I'm guessing this is your first board? Profile shape, liveliness, flex, etc are all personal preference that you won't develop until you have a season or two under your belt. And as other posters have mentioned there are a number of other factors involved in a boards performance beyond just the the profile, but flat/rocker is fairly versatile. As long as it's sized correctly and you got a good deal on the board I'd say keep it. Don't overthink things until you have enough experience to know what you're looking for performance wise. Just keep things as inexpensive as possible and upgrade down the road.
Because you like to ride more all mountain and have the option to return it, I suggest you return it and get a board that has some camber in it and is more designed for all mountain riding. Like a CRC or RCR that is a directional twin with a medium-medium/stiff flex. Flat with rocker tips will be great for learning to link turns and/or anything park/jib but it won't ride as well all mountain as a board meant for it with some camber. When you start to pick your speed up and ride hard pack or ice you'll really appreciate having a board with some camber and contact points.

My two cents.
I've ridden the K2 Parkstar for the past 4 or 5 years and is the board I currently ride. I can assure you it's a whole lot softer than a 7/10 unless they stiffened it up a lot since 2013. I'd say my board was about a 4/5 out of 10 new and now about a 3. This board is perfect for what I do, granted I ride Midwest on hills about 700 feet and smaller with a good amount of park, so if you're intended uses are different than mine, I can't comment on it's performance. Mine is really easy to press/butter and is pretty flexible torsionally, too.
I had a parkstar a couple of years ago and hated it. It felt like a plank to me, I didn't like the side cut on it either. It was the year they stiffened it up. I would way rather be on a flow era, westmark, actually almost any other board i have ridden. It was one of my least favorite boards ever.

The good news if you keep it, is that it is stiff enough for all meowntain (assuming its similar to the one i rode), the rocker is minimal so it is very stable if you like to bomb.

I don't like it, others do. Do what you think is best.
Flat camber IMO is probably the least ideal all mountain camber shape. That and banana rocker. Just because it's stiff doesn't mean it'll be good for general purposes. Do yourself a favor and pick up a YES basic. A solid all mountain performer at an introductory price. Look on sierratradingpost, plenty there for super discounted price.
Aright, so based off what everyone is saying I am going to look for a new board. I am thinking of getting a hybrid, maybe 60%camber 40%rocker. Everyone agree?
 

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Aright, so based off what everyone is saying I am going to look for a new board. I am thinking of getting a hybrid, maybe 60%camber 40%rocker. Everyone agree?
I am going to disagree. As an advanced beginner (not carving yet, etc.) a different board will not make a meaningful difference. Much better to invest the money in lessons.
 

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I am going to disagree. As an advanced beginner (not carving yet, etc.) a different board will not make a meaningful difference. Much better to invest the money in lessons.
Depends on instructor... take money buy season pass and destroy whatever board you ride with 100+ days:hairy:






:snowboard3:
 

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Depends on instructor... take money buy season pass and destroy whatever board you ride with 100+ days:hairy:






:snowboard3:
Fine, revised version then:
As an advanced beginner (not carving yet, etc.) a different board will not make a meaningful difference. Much better to invest the money in lessons and more riding.
 

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Fine, revised version then:
As an advanced beginner (not carving yet, etc.) a different board will not make a meaningful difference. Much better to invest the money in lessons and more riding.
The board is already purchased. The original question was should he keep the one he bought impulsively or return it and get a different shape.

You should return the board and get a different shape. Camber dominant hybrid board is a good choice.
 

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The board is already purchased. The original question was should he keep the one he bought impulsively or return it and get a different shape.

You should return the board and get a different shape. Camber dominant hybrid board is a good choice.
My bad, I saw his other thread where he said it was a gift but did not see that he can return it.

I still say keep. Different board will make no discernible difference.
 
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