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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For the last couple of season's...I have always bought resort food and never took the time to bring my own food. Mostly from laziness and because since I only went snowboarding 1-2 times a week...I figured that $20 on food/water/drinks for a week's snowboarding was not much of a deal breaker.

I am somewhat lucky in that a hot dog or bean burrito at my local resort is pretty cheap. I think 2-3 bucks is what I can remember last time I checked. A burger and fries...F#$K...that's like taking out a loan. My local resort charges upwards of over $10 just for a burger and fries. I always stick to the hot dog or bean burrito as it was always the cheapest food on the menu.

This season...I am trying to make it a goal to bring my own food to save some money. What are some good food options and/or recipes/snacks that you guys have bought to the mountain/resort...?

I know most people will mainly suggest...trail mix, sandwiches, ramen/cup-o-noodles or leftovers from last night's dinner. But...you can only do sandwiches, cup-o-noodles or leftovers for so long until you eventually get tired of it.

So...when I say food options...I mean...trying to figure out a way to bring 'wholesome' food that has lots of vitamins and minerals. That ultimately fills you up and is tasty and nutritious for you. Think...roast beef with vegetables and mashed potatoes.

I was thinking of going all out...'survivalist/prepper' style. And getting some of those off road camping/survivalist type cooking gear for the trunk of my car so I can basically BBQ, grill or cook my own homemade recipes/meals straight from the back of my car in the resort parking lot.

Seen it many times at many resorts and I thought that it might be a great choice/option. Only problem is...the trunk of my car is relatively small and I don't know how much camping/cooking gear I can fit in the back of my car along with all my snowboarding gear also.
 

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Some places have lots where people gather and grill during lunch. You could find those, or you could do it yourself. Personally, I don't like to take a break for that long, so for me it is usually a sandwich, beef jerky, granola bars or stuff like that. An of course fireball, peppermint schnapps or beer depending on the day. Usually just eat on the lift. If I get tired or have a bunch of friends with me I'll stop at the lodge.
 

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I used to be so ghetto fab my future wife and I would bring those instant oatmeal packets and use the cafeterias disposable cups, hot water, coffee creamers, and plastic spoons which are all free. Hot lunch for like $0.27 :grin:

But if you want a pot roast or something maybe consider plugging in a slow cooker somewhere with a sticker asking people not to eat it's contents, or maybe it will work with a power inverter in your car??? I'm certain I have seen people do this in lodges but maybe I can just vividly imagine some non English speaking family doing this lol. There is plenty you one pot meals you can make. Otherwise it's what you said and cooking and bbq'ing with camp gear.
 

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Landjagër or jerky, cheese, crackers, chocolate and red bull/water ditch it in a tree well near "the Bakery" and come back later for a short break.

May try beers and thermos with warm coffee this year
 

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You could always get one of those coleman 1 or 2 burner camping stoves, a pot or pan, then cook whatever you could normally cook at your home stove. You mentioned hot dogs, so you can BBQ them over the stove or boil them. Personally, that isn't for me. I wouldn't want to clean up that shit, nor pack a smelly pot in my car to stew for the day while I am snowboarding. I try to keep it simple. I also tend to eat mainly sandwiches, since they aren't too heavy on your stomach like a hamburger is, but can be satisfying.

Actually, now that I think more about this subject, if you really wanted to do the hamburger thing, you could BBQ them the night before and just heat them in a pan over the stove. Toast the bun over the burner, snag some of those single use condiments, and make it.
 

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really old school trick....whatever hot meal or left-over wrap in a tin and/foil and then place it in the engine compartment and let it cook or warm up as you drive up the hill. Or use a good old thermos put rice, pasta, noodles and whatever in it, add boiling water and seal. It will be done cooking in a few hours and still hot.
 

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Actually, now that I think more about this subject, if you really wanted to do the hamburger thing, you could BBQ them the night before and just heat them in a pan over the stove. Toast the bun over the burner, snag some of those single use condiments, and make it.
That's a good idea and reminds me of this summer I pre cooked taco meat for camping and it was easy as hell to heat and serve the next day.
 

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seems like the options with soup, chili, gumbo and anything similar with some bread are enough alone to get thru a season. add anything a kid would eat for lunch on lazy days, a juice box can get pretty tasty. (chips, ham n cheese, pbj, pickles, cheese sticks, lunchables, fresh fruit)

u can use a lodge microwave, but my campstove heats up a ton of soup fast



who eats lunch on powder days? gtfo

as other said, trail mix, jerky, granola or cliff bars

when I'm riding hard all i want is electrolytes water and beer
 

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For the last couple of season's...I have always bought resort food and never took the time to bring my own food. Mostly from laziness and because since I only went snowboarding 1-2 times a week...I figured that $20 on food/water/drinks for a week's snowboarding was not much of a deal breaker.

I know most people will mainly suggest...trail mix, sandwiches, ramen/cup-o-noodles or leftovers from last night's dinner. But...you can only do sandwiches, cup-o-noodles or leftovers for so long until you eventually get tired of it.

So...when I say food options...I mean...trying to figure out a way to bring 'wholesome' food that you would cook for your family on a Sunday evening dinner. That ultimately fills you up and is tasty and nutritious for you. Think...roast beef with vegetables and mashed potatoes.
I mean if you go 1-2 times a week you really shouldn't be getting tired of that stuff unless you do that for work everyday. When the conditions are good the last thing I want to do is get off the mountain and fire up a grill. I can understand wanting to do that in the spring when its warmer out and you're not itching to get in as many runs as you can while the getting is good.

I like to make my own pizza dough and make 5 or 6 pizzas for the cabin, also you can get creative with the toppings. Usually there are plenty of leftovers and I wrap a few slices in tinfoil and bring them in my jacket for the next day on the mountain. I make pasta too but I find dealing with containers to be more of a hassle at the mountain.

Or better yet go all out on breakfast so you don't need a big lunch to keep you going. Steak/eggs/potatoes/fried onions can be quick to fry up to get you out for first chair while keeping you fueled all day. All I would need after a breakfast like that is a pb&j and granola bar on the lift and I'm set for the day.
 

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In my youth, I'll admit I didn't give AF - now with some years under my belt I can't believe what my diet consisted of. I definitely don't have a perfect diet right now but it's WAY better than it used to be. I can't believe, with what we know now about long-term consumption of certain foods, that people still eat what they eat. I took my nephew out riding last season and he brought two friends with him. Their diet (not my nephew's because I didn't allow it) was potato chips and a Powerade for the entire day - we rode from about 8:30am to 3:30pm - they are pre-teens and that's what their parents gave them for lunch if you can believe it (they also bought candy/pop at the concession).

Whomever mentioned bringing a portable grill is where it's at imo. Bring whatever you choose and make it yourself. With the prices of food/beverages these days at resorts they're lucky they still get my money for lift-tickets regularly. Even that's changing as I find myself going backcountry more and more - best I avoid the mega-resort rant now.....back to food. Fruit/Vegetables/Clean Carbs and whole proteins - you're exercising vigorously for 6-8 hours people, think about that! Sure, get some junk food/pop/adult beverages here and there but your base diet should be reasonable imo. Jesus, I sound like my......wait a second.....
 

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I'm a pretty husky guy that works out a lot so I'm always starving. Strangely enough, not so much when I ride. It could be from the beer I drink, but I don't usually get too hungry riding. BUT just in case I like to bring energy snacks, like Clif bars, fig bars, protein bars, that kinda stuff. I used to get 60% off Clif and Odwalla bars with my 3point5 membership, but alas I no longer work in a ski shop so that's out the window. For the rest of us without that luxury, if you're near a Costco or anything and have a membership, you can stock up on stuff like that real cheap. Failing that, just get em at Walmart. Definitely beats the price of single items at a convenience store. They're small, easy to carry and have lots of complex carbs and proteins so they're good for activities where you want something in your stomach but don't want a lot of bulk or rib sticking discomfort.

Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
 

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Im @ the bank finalizing the sale of my car, so haven't read entire thread. But If your car'ing it,... all it takes a little imagination!
@neni & Mr. Neni brought Swiss made cheese & chocolate to tailgate @ Bachelor!!! When I was in CO. for '16! @Mojo had a lil hibachi or sum such & did some àprèse Lamb chops @ Luv!! Freakin' awesome!!
(...if I didn't already,.. thanks for that mojo!!!) ;)
Hell,.. I brought some home baked Molasses cookies with me from MI. to pass around. And YES! I baked them myself! ;) :laugh:

@wrathfuldeity made sammiches for us @ Baker!

It's not all that hard to do. Im sure you'll get sum good suggestions here.
 

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also, go into cabelas and rei, the shit they have for camp cooking these days is mindblowing compared to 20 years ago (when i was first snowboarding and camping and whatnot)

equipment

recipes

dry goods

packaging

gets pretty fancy
 

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smoked/dried sausage, fatty biltong/jerkey, hard cheese and blocks of kerrygold butter. gonna try making pemmican at some point.
 

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also, go into cabelas and rei, the shit they have for camp cooking these days is mindblowing compared to 20 years ago (when i was first snowboarding and camping and whatnot)

equipment

recipes

dry goods

packaging

gets pretty fancy

Im old enough that I was eating C-rations while in the service. Beans n balls, beans & baby dicks, alpo, pasgetti, ham n eggs (...shit was mixed n congealed into a lump in a single can! DISGUSTING!) ;) :laugh:

MRE's (meals ready to eat) were an improvement (...of sorts!) but didn't come along in until the last year or so i was still in active duty.

So as SK said,.. count your blessings things are much more palatable nowadays!! >:)

(As someone earlier mentioned,.. we would take the dried strawberries from the mre's, mix with sugar & powdered creamer from the coffee,.. mix that with a handfull of snow??? Voila !!! Dirtbag, gangstah ice cream!!!) :laugh:
 
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At least when its just me whenever I start to add it all up while it is certainly cheaper to pack when I add the trips and time to get stuff ready it's borderline not worth it.

I'm not talking about a gathering in the parking lot, that is an event on its own. But for just me I'll spend the extra $5-7 or whatever. Though I do always bring my own drinks.

I do tend to stop off at a good sized grocery store if theres one on the way and get a good deli sandwich though.
 

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I try to avoid eating lunch on the mountain, so I'll go from opening to about 2-3pm or so then eat a nice meal somewhere else. I'll have some snacks like almonds, peanuts or an energy bar in my pocket though.

The best part? From 12pm -1pm the trails are empty because everyone is inside for lunch. :)
 

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Which brings up "energy management" so that you can ride all day without stopping for lunch...to avoid the usually after lunch blaa.

On the drive up, pre-hydrate and have a banana

At the parking lot...I have my vitamins and stuff (sometimes I will get a breakfast burrito at the lodge, have them wrap it in plastic to eat later while on the lift...breakfast lodge food is cheaper)

While riding through out the day...will take a bite or two of my homemade burrito/breakfast burrito while on the lift. Other very good options are nuts, dried fruit or trail mix/granola or tubes of peanut butter and honey. The idea is just nibble a bit on every couple chair rides up, with a bit of water or electrolytes...you want a mix of long burn protein and some short turn burn sugars like honey/dried fruit. That way you maintain fuel to burn without devoting a bunch of body resources to digesting a bigger meal and end up with the blaa.

That way you can go first to last...I have a couple of ski buds who are 60+ that always do this and their record at Blackcomb is 72k vert by 4pm...on a regular day they will easily get 55-60k.

Then at the end of the day do beers and a good meal.
 

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A coffee with coconut oil in the morning is all I need to ride all day. Intermittent fasting by snowboard
 

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Single burner coleman stove as someone mentioned costs about 20 bucks. Youll probably find it to be a pain in the arse though. Make a sandwich and leave it in your car. If you like a toasted sandwich toast it on your 20 dollar stove.
 
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