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Hi,

This will be my first year snowboarding. I have never done any winter sports before so I am excited. I have some questions regarding gear, as I am new to all of this. I am 6’1, 220, size 13 feet. I purchased the following gear so far, but i am able to exchange it if needed. I just want to get advice from experts all around. I purchased the 2021 Arbor Formula Rocker, 162MW (262.5mm waist width) with Arbor Hemlock bindings (L/XL). For boots I was recommend Ride Lasso, but i am not sure if I want to invest $300 into my first pair of boots, therefore i have not purchased them yet. Besides that, I am still looking into googles, helmet, etc. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!
 

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Hi,

This will be my first year snowboarding. I have never done any winter sports before so I am excited. I have some questions regarding gear, as I am new to all of this. I am 6’1, 220, size 13 feet. I purchased the following gear so far, but i am able to exchange it if needed. I just want to get advice from experts all around. I purchased the 2021 Arbor Formula Rocker, 162MW (262.5mm waist width) with Arbor Hemlock bindings (L/XL). For boots I was recommend Ride Lasso, but i am not sure if I want to invest $300 into my first pair of boots, therefore i have not purchased them yet. Besides that, I am still looking into googles, helmet, etc. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!
If anything, boots should come first in that buy the best fitting and most comfortable boot for your foot within your budget. If that's $300 then so be it but try a few on and don't let salesman dictate what fits best and aligns with their clearance stock.

Have a look through the booot pages regarding fitting and how they should feel, most buy boots too big when starting out. The best board in the best conditions in the world will still be shit with sore feet all day.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If anything, boots should come first in that buy the best fitting and most comfortable boot for your foot within your budget. If that's $300 then so be it but try a few on and don't let salesman dictate what fits best and aligns with their clearance stock.

Have a look through the booot pages regarding fitting and how they should feel, most buy boots too big when starting out. The best board in the best conditions in the world will still be shit with sore feet all day.
If anything, boots should come first in that buy the best fitting and most comfortable boot for your foot within your budget. If that's $300 then so be it but try a few on and don't let salesman dictate what fits best and aligns with their clearance stock.

Have a look through the booot pages regarding fitting and how they should feel, most buy boots too big when starting out. The best board in the best conditions in the world will still be shit with sore feet all day.
You’re totally right. That’s what a couple salespeople told me as well. I have the money for the boots, and they are super comfy. I was just wondering if there were any other suggested boots that are also comfortable. But i guess that depends on the persons preference as well. Thank you!
 

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@NT.Thunder is totally right. Boots will probably outlast whatever board/bindings you get. A recommendation of brand or model isn't going to be super helpful, because the best boot is the one that best fits your foot, and fits the flex range you want. I'd recommend @Wiredsport's guide on here and The Angry Snowboarder's boot fitting guide on YouTube before you consult with the shop.

Other things to look out for that have been mentioned in other threads here are to consider getting aftermarket insoles, and to look at where the stitching is on the toe of the boot, because it might get cut if you rest the edges of your board on the toe of your boot without figuring out a solution to protect the stitches.

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@NT.Thunder is totally right. Boots will probably outlast whatever board/bindings you get. A recommendation of brand or model isn't going to be super helpful, because the best boot is the one that best fits your foot, and fits the flex range you want. I'd recommend @Wiredsport's guide on here and The Angry Snowboarder's boot fitting guide on YouTube before you consult with the shop.

Other things to look out for that have been mentioned in other threads here are to consider getting aftermarket insoles, and to look at where the stitching is on the toe of the boot, because it might get cut if you rest the edges of your board on the toe of your boot without figuring out a solution to protect the stitches.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
Thanks for the advice! I will definitely keep that in mind. What are your thoughts the the gear i described? I want to make sure it will be good. I ordered it online so I haven’t gotten the change to try it yet.
 

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Good board and binding combo. Learning on an Arbor Formula Rocker is gonna be rad. Arbor's parabolic rocker is forgiving to ride but can still shred. Griptech helps with traction and confidence, and it lets you steer underfoot more. I've heard good things about those bindings, but be careful if you adjust the heelcup on those bindings. Those screws are really tight from the factory, and they're easy to strip out.

It's already been mentioned, but definitely check out bootfit 101 and get some boots that fit well along with some thin snowboarding socks. Proper fit is more important than what technology is in the boot. I'm using Ride Fuse, with traditional laces. Most people get boots that are too big. They connect you to your board, and loose boots are 10 times harder to ride and learn in. I wear 13 shoes and ride in 11 boots, but I'm on the aggressive side of sizing down and had to modify things a little here and there to get that to work.

After at least a decade of mismatched gear, I finally got goggles that mate up to my helmet. It made a huge difference in terms of fogging. The airflow channels on the helmet and goggles line up, and I'm not fogging up anymore. I'm about your size, and I got Smith Squad XL goggles and like the cheapest Smith helmet. I'll probably upgrade to one with MIPS. Love the goggles though. Chromapop technology is legit for my eyes, and they come with two lenses. Helmets are like boots- you've got to take care to get one that fits your head.

If you're not too demanding about a tailored fit, I really like Kinco gloves and mittens. They last a really long time if you wax them every so often, they're warm, and they're cheap. Kinco probably offers the best value around.

I personally prefer bibs to pants. Bibs keep me warmer without feeling hot. It's way harder to get snow down the back of them as well, so you're much drier at the end of the day. Bibs handle powder days better than pants hands down. I also find them to be more comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good board and binding combo. Learning on an Arbor Formula Rocker is gonna be rad. Arbor's parabolic rocker is forgiving to ride but can still shred. Griptech helps with traction and confidence, and it lets you steer underfoot more. I've heard good things about those bindings, but be careful if you adjust the heelcup on those bindings. Those screws are really tight from the factory, and they're easy to strip out.

It's already been mentioned, but definitely check out bootfit 101 and get some boots that fit well along with some thin snowboarding socks. Proper fit is more important than what technology is in the boot. I'm using Ride Fuse, with traditional laces. Most people get boots that are too big. They connect you to your board, and loose boots are 10 times harder to ride and learn in. I wear 13 shoes and ride in 11 boots, but I'm on the aggressive side of sizing down and had to modify things a little here and there to get that to work.

After at least a decade of mismatched gear, I finally got goggles that mate up to my helmet. It made a huge difference in terms of fogging. The airflow channels on the helmet and goggles line up, and I'm not fogging up anymore. I'm about your size, and I got Smith Squad XL goggles and like the cheapest Smith helmet. I'll probably upgrade to one with MIPS. Love the goggles though. Chromapop technology is legit for my eyes, and they come with two lenses. Helmets are like boots- you've got to take care to get one that fits your head.

If you're not too demanding about a tailored fit, I really like Kinco gloves and mittens. They last a really long time if you wax them every so often, they're warm, and they're cheap. Kinco probably offers the best value around.

I personally prefer bibs to pants. Bibs keep me warmer without feeling hot. It's way harder to get snow down the back of them as well, so you're much drier at the end of the day. Bibs handle powder days better than pants hands down. I also find them to be more comfortable.
Thanks for the advice! I will definitely take it into consideration while i buy the rest of my equipment.
 

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You’re totally right. That’s what a couple salespeople told me as well. I have the money for the boots, and they are super comfy. I was just wondering if there were any other suggested boots that are also comfortable. But i guess that depends on the persons preference as well. Thank you!
If you the boots you are trying on are "super comfy" in the store they are too big. There are plenty of videos on youtube you can watch for getting proper boot fit.
 

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If you the boots you are trying on are "super comfy" in the store they are too big. There are plenty of videos on youtube you can watch for getting proper boot fit.
This is good advice,.

They should fit snug/tight without causing pain. You will gain about half a size after riding 10 days or so. Heat molding will help the break-in process.
 
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