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Basic edge tool for the side jobs. Most can be set at either 90 deg. or somethin like 88 deg., some fancier ones have more settings. Like Hound says, this is likely all you would need to do occasionally to keep edges fresh.

Straight file for base, with tape wound around to get desired angles.
 

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For people that wax with your bindings on (gasp!) what do you set the board on? I was setting boards plastic buckets, but noticed they are leaving marks on the top sheet.

Bindings flat on the table and be gentle and balanced, or did you make something so then board sits flat?
 

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For people that wax with your bindings on (gasp!) what do you set the board on? I was setting boards plastic buckets, but noticed they are leaving marks on the top sheet.

Bindings flat on the table and be gentle and balanced, or did you make something so then board sits flat?
I used to use my summer tires before I made a stand. I'd recommend loosening the bindings before heating up the base, but that's really up to you.
 

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Oh god...NO!
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For people that wax with your bindings on (gasp!) what do you set the board on? I was setting boards plastic buckets, but noticed they are leaving marks on the top sheet.

Bindings flat on the table and be gentle and balanced, or did you make something so then board sits flat?
I would take a fence board and screw two pieces of 2X4s to the board. These 2x4s will fit into your bindings to hold the board in place (as an alternative, lock your boots into the bindings and have the 2x4s go into the boots.

Now your board will be base-side up so you can work on edges, waxing etc. To stop the fence board from moving around, cut a peice of rubber yoga mat and lay it between the fence board and your table, floor or whatever you're working on.
 

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Oh god...NO!
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I would take a fence board and screw two pieces of 2X4s to the board. These 2x4s will fit into your bindings to hold the board in place (as an alternative, lock your boots into the bindings and have the 2x4s go into the boots.

Now your board will be base-side up so you can work on edges, waxing etc. To stop the fence board from moving around, cut a peice of rubber yoga mat and lay it between the fence board and your table, floor or whatever you're working on.
Here's a quick sketch
 

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Oh god...NO!
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How long are the 2x4’s
I would say as deep as your boot is so that the 2X4 rests on the sole of the boot plus may an extra half or half inch. In retrospect you could double up the 2x4s so that it firmly fits into your boot, as though your foot was in it. The goal is to make sure your ride fits nice and snug and moves around as little as possible while you're working on it.
 

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About Waxing Your Board

Posted by KyleWeevers
Prepare for a long ass post people, I'll give you all the knowledge I have gotten over the past 7 years that I've been a tech in regards to wax:

I will start by saying no matter what base type you have a wax job will always be beneficial, having a smooth clean surface to glide on will help you keep speed on the flats, and will also help in maneuvering through pow. Extruded bases do not have to be waxed quite as often as sintered bases and this is because extruded bases are more porous. The bad thing about that is they can get deeper scratches and gouges than a sintered base.

Sintered bases should be waxed often. How often would be determined by the snow you ride. If its man made gun blown snow, wax it every time. Man made snow crystals are very sharp, and larger than snow from the heavens, and because of this it will rip the wax right off your base by the end of the day. If its light fluffy powder you can go as long as 4 - 5 riding days without a new wax coat.

Types and Temperature of waxes:

There are many different types of waxes out there, but the most common is flouro based waxes. They are fairly long lasting, and can take a rough rider. The other type as Snowolf mentioned is graphite. Graphite comes in one colour; black. It will be noticeable on a white base and people will think you need a wax job. .That is until you flash by 'em laughing your ass off. Graphite wax is harder and creates better glide with the snow than flouro wax does. Thus it is a faster wax. It doesn't have the same staying power, but it will make you ride faster.

The whole purpose of wax:

The whole purpose of wax is not to reduce friction, but to increase. It is a huge misconception that wax will help decrease friction. To fully explain this we must examine a few other things that are related to the base of our beloved snowboards.

Base pattern: Have you ever looked at a dried out base and noticed that there is a sort of pattern to it? It looks like a bunch of dotted lines staggered one after another running lengthwise down the board. This pattern is the start of what creates the all important glide of a snowboard, by making these patterns you are creating channels for which water runs down and moves your snowboard. Many shops offer a stone grind as part of their full tune packages and what the stone does is embeds the pattern into your base.

Now when you wax your board you fill in the grooves of the base patten to create a level surface and scrape away all the excess. This helps the flow of water that is created from the friction of gliding your board on the snow. The base pattern then directs the water down the channels and gets you rockin' faster.

This is why when you get scratches and gouges that run widthwise on your board they will slow you down more than a scratch or gouge that runs lengthwise. Also when you get scratches and deeper gouges you allow water to pool inside them and create more drag for yourself as you ride.

So in the end we use wax to increase the friction between the board and the snow to the point where water is created, and then the snowboard glides on the water, the quicker you go from snow to water, the quicker you get down the mountain. And we use the water channels created through base patterns and waxing to help direct the water through the running length of the board so that it escapes quickly.

Temperatures of wax:

Its as easy as match the colour to the temp. But for a longer explanation I'll explain the differences between warm and cold waxes. Cold waxes are much harder and as such need more heat and friction to soften them. Generally when it is colder outside snow crystals are more jagged and hard which means more friction on the board which means a colder wax will last longer. Inversely a warm wax is soft and does not need much heat to warm up and create the required glide. If you were to use warm wax on a cold day it would be pointless because the jagged ice crystals would burn off the wax in short order, and if you were to use a cold wax on a warm day, you would have to ride for 1/2 the day and not stop after that to finally get the wax to where you get a glide out of it.

That being said, whether its a cold or warm day I generally will put cold wax around the edges of my board because they will heat up faster than any other part of the board, the edges see more friction than any other part of the board so I use a cold wax for a good over all coat to make sure I get the entire use of my board rather than just the middle of it.
thank you for sharing .....im just getting ready to open up a ski amd snowboard store and im sure everything you wrote is going to be very helpfull for me and the shoppers
 

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About Waxing Your Board

Posted by KyleWeevers
Prepare for a long ass post people, I'll give you all the knowledge I have gotten over the past 7 years that I've been a tech in regards to wax:

I will start by saying no matter what base type you have a wax job will always be beneficial, having a smooth clean surface to glide on will help you keep speed on the flats, and will also help in maneuvering through pow. Extruded bases do not have to be waxed quite as often as sintered bases and this is because extruded bases are more porous. The bad thing about that is they can get deeper scratches and gouges than a sintered base.

Sintered bases should be waxed often. How often would be determined by the snow you ride. If its man made gun blown snow, wax it every time. Man made snow crystals are very sharp, and larger than snow from the heavens, and because of this it will rip the wax right off your base by the end of the day. If its light fluffy powder you can go as long as 4 - 5 riding days without a new wax coat.

Types and Temperature of waxes:

There are many different types of waxes out there, but the most common is flouro based waxes. They are fairly long lasting, and can take a rough rider. The other type as Snowolf mentioned is graphite. Graphite comes in one colour; black. It will be noticeable on a white base and people will think you need a wax job. .That is until you flash by 'em laughing your ass off. Graphite wax is harder and creates better glide with the snow than flouro wax does. Thus it is a faster wax. It doesn't have the same staying power, but it will make you ride faster.

The whole purpose of wax:

The whole purpose of wax is not to reduce friction, but to increase. It is a huge misconception that wax will help decrease friction. To fully explain this we must examine a few other things that are related to the base of our beloved snowboards.

Base pattern: Have you ever looked at a dried out base and noticed that there is a sort of pattern to it? It looks like a bunch of dotted lines staggered one after another running lengthwise down the board. This pattern is the start of what creates the all important glide of a snowboard, by making these patterns you are creating channels for which water runs down and moves your snowboard. Many shops offer a stone grind as part of their full tune packages and what the stone does is embeds the pattern into your base.

Now when you wax your board you fill in the grooves of the base patten to create a level surface and scrape away all the excess. This helps the flow of water that is created from the friction of gliding your board on the snow. The base pattern then directs the water down the channels and gets you rockin' faster.

This is why when you get scratches and gouges that run widthwise on your board they will slow you down more than a scratch or gouge that runs lengthwise. Also when you get scratches and deeper gouges you allow water to pool inside them and create more drag for yourself as you ride.

So in the end we use wax to increase the friction between the board and the snow to the point where water is created, and then the snowboard glides on the water, the quicker you go from snow to water, the quicker you get down the mountain. And we use the water channels created through base patterns and waxing to help direct the water through the running length of the board so that it escapes quickly.

Temperatures of wax:

Its as easy as match the colour to the temp. But for a longer explanation I'll explain the differences between warm and cold waxes. Cold waxes are much harder and as such need more heat and friction to soften them. Generally when it is colder outside snow crystals are more jagged and hard which means more friction on the board which means a colder wax will last longer. Inversely a warm wax is soft and does not need much heat to warm up and create the required glide. If you were to use warm wax on a cold day it would be pointless because the jagged ice crystals would burn off the wax in short order, and if you were to use a cold wax on a warm day, you would have to ride for 1/2 the day and not stop after that to finally get the wax to where you get a glide out of it.

That being said, whether its a cold or warm day I generally will put cold wax around the edges of my board because they will heat up faster than any other part of the board, the edges see more friction than any other part of the board so I use a cold wax for a good over all coat to make sure I get the entire use of my board rather than just the middle of it.
Cold wax around the edges...that is next level!
 

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For people that wax with your bindings on (gasp!) what do you set the board on? I was setting boards plastic buckets, but noticed they are leaving marks on the top sheet.

Bindings flat on the table and be gentle and balanced, or did you make something so then board sits flat?
Fold the highbacks, bunch up some old shirts or towels to give it stability
 

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Destroying Worlds Since 2015
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I would imagine that most of the wax comes off pretty fast, but you can ride a board for a while before it really starts to feel like it desperately needs another wax.
 

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I would imagine that most of the wax comes off pretty fast, but you can ride a board for a while before it really starts to feel like it desperately needs another wax.
The type of snow also has an affect on the +/- level of abbrasivenes of removing wax from the base ie man made = bad V super light powder = good.
 

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Definitely agree that base structure will be huge, especially in wetter snow, but overall does a lot. This will be more obvious on newer boards, used bases tend to retain more wax and release it better IMO. But wax doesn't come off that fast, it's very depended on the snow, but even on early season ice groomers, the sides near the edges (where it comes off the quickest) will start to dry out at least at the end of a full day.
 

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do you guys subscribe to Angry Snowboarder's theory that wax comes off the first few runs and base-grinding actually does more than wax?
To each his own, Avran is a knowledgeable lad but with his personal nuances. One of those might be the above statement. I see it this way: a board with not so good structure but properly waxed would ride better and last longer than a board with good structure and careless approach to waxing, for this reason.

I think it depends not only on snow conditions but the wax itself (type of temperature). I rarely use high-temp wax (like -5+5 or even -10). I prefer universal all-temp wax. The downside is, it's pretty hard, and gets 150 Celcius to melt it, and once it drops it hardens in an instant. But once applied, it holds great and lasts me long.
Don't get me wrong here, iI don't cover the board with 1-2 mm thick layer! I use fiberlene (like XC skier servicemen usually do) so the layer is thin, and even after that I brush all the extra stuff away. Base needs wax, or it gets dried ("whitens") and rides poorly.
 
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