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Discussion Starter #1
Booked a trip to Powder Mountain and I'm very excited. I have never ridden there before. However I'll be alone this trip and I'm slightly concerned I picked a mountain that will be desolate to the point of being dangerous to ride by myself. I'm not worried about my skill level and I know how to handle myself on steeps. Trees, eh, I'm decent. I'll likely stay out of the park. But, accidents happen.

I usually ride alone, and on most mountains on most days you can count on someone coming across you at some point or to be within shouting/whistle distance. I don't want to end up James Franco'd in 127 hrs...or in a treewell. I know the answer here is "ride within your limits" and I will, but I'd like some advice on keeping safe riding alone on a mountain like PM.


Anyway, I'm being a chicken shit. Feel free to leave a burn, I've got my flame suit on.
 

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…….. I don't want to end up James Franco'd in 127 hrs...or in a treewell. …..
Just remember to bring a good serrated blade so you can cut your arm off cleanly..

:grin:

You will probably be fine. It might be good to wear bright colors and have a loud whistle mounted somewhere you could easily reach in a bad situation. I find that riding alone in challenging conditions changes my mindset and I become very focused and deliberate. It's kind of a rush if done correctly. YMMV
 

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Booked a trip to Powder Mountain and I'm very excited. I have never ridden there before. However I'll be alone this trip and I'm slightly concerned I picked a mountain that will be desolate to the point of being dangerous to ride by myself. I'm not worried about my skill level and I know how to handle myself on steeps. Trees, eh, I'm decent. I'll likely stay out of the park. But, accidents happen.

I usually ride alone, and on most mountains on most days you can count on someone coming across you at some point or to be within shouting/whistle distance. I don't want to end up James Franco'd in 127 hrs...or in a treewell. I know the answer here is "ride within your limits" and I will, but I'd like some advice on keeping safe riding alone on a mountain like PM.


Anyway, I'm being a chicken shit. Feel free to leave a burn, I've got my flame suit on.
As a person who's fallen halfway down a vent hole suspended over a river and cavern one year, and then fallen and lacerated their liver, ruptured an adrenal gland and more another year, all while riding by myself, just don't be a whimp and get a strong survival instinct. If you're strong you'll be fine, if you're not then Darwinism wins and we get rid of the weak!

But no seriously

A: Don't be scared, you'll ride worse, should something happen you'll react worse, you react worse the situation gets worse, everything will be worse
B: If you're riding in bounds and smart your car ride there is more likely to kill you.
 

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B: If you're riding in bounds and smart your car ride there is more likely to kill you.
this really. you've surely ridden pow on your own before? just stay away from dodgy looking trees, as always.

As deagol says, being completely solo (inbounds/sidecountry) and out of earshot in deep powder should focus you and make you plan your track more than you might otherwise. It's quite exhilarating
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone, I appreciate the feedback. Honestly - my opinion reflects what has been said in the thread, I was just having the post booking jitters.
 

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Find out if the resort has cell coverage / where any dead zones are. If it doesn't have cell coverage, consider taking a satellite communicator with you (e.g. InReach). Program ski patrol / the resorts phone number into said device.

Won't save you 100% of the time, but will be helpful if you get hurt out of sight.

Also, tone down your gnarly send factor by 2
 

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Find out if the resort has cell coverage / where any dead zones are. If it doesn't have cell coverage, consider taking a satellite communicator with you (e.g. InReach). Program ski patrol / the resorts phone number into said device.

Won't save you 100% of the time, but will be helpful if you get hurt out of sight.

Also, tone down your gnarly send factor by 2
Will you not be able to tag along with some other random people riding?
 
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