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Destroying Worlds Since 2015
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Hero10 is GoPro's newest addition to their line-up, and so far seems to have answered pretty much every criticism that people have had about the earlier models. It shoots up to 5.3K video and up to 240 FPS (not at the same time, though) for some great slo-mo or very fine detailed videos.

So, first, some background...

I bought a Rylo 360 camera a couple of years back. Nice camera, good price, great form factor. It came out with the first/best auto stabilization which took the industry by storm. Unfortunately Rylo didn't stay at the bleeding edge, and once everyone else copied the stabilization, that was it for them. The camera also suffered from some obvious shortcomings, like the inability to preview footage without a USB connection.

After that, I bought an Insta360 One X, which had all the features of the Rylo, plus the ability to control the camera and preview footage using your phone. But the One X suffered from a Teletubby form factor which caused a lot of shake on a mountain bike--too much for the stabilization to handle.

Next, I bought the Insta360 One R (starting to notice a pattern here?), which is an incredibly useful system. Modular in nature, you can swap out the 360 lenses for a 4K camera lens or a one-inch wide angle. I mostly love the One R and have used it a lot in both snowboarding and mountain biking. However, the 360 video, when exported, produces a relatively low-quality standard video. 1024x768 kind of low quality. So the videos were useful for my own review, but not really something I'd put on a blog.

I decided to try out the 4K lens instead of the 360 module. With the 4K, unlike the 360, you have to be concerned about aiming your camera, which is why I've tended to avoid it. Being able to just turn on the camera and edit the flow you want afterwards is hard to beat. But a little playing showed me that the chest mount is pretty bulletproof in terms of getting good POV.

So one of the problems with the Insta360 camera is that they tend to be flaky. It's a software thing, but sometimes they just randomly glitch. On one of my sessions a couple of weeks ago, I was struggling with the camera on almost every run. It would start recording then turn off, or disconnect from the remote, or refuse to start recording. On my last run, a truly awesome blast down Crank It Up, the camera locked up, and in the process of getting it back I lost the video. So I screamed invective at the heavens and ordered a GoPro (it's as good an excuse as any).

The GoPro is smaller and lighter than the One R, with a very similar form factor (wide brick-ish shape). It has a control screen on the back, and a preview screen on the front. The first thing to notice is the user interface on the control screen. Besides being bigger than the One R and having better icons, it is also more intuitive. The GoPro is also more dependable in that it hasn't glitched on me (yet, anyway). One issue that I'm running into is that the GoPro will sometimes record videos upside down, since I'm mounting it upside down on my chest mount. I think it has something to do with GoPro's horizon levelling feature. You can lock the POV on the control screen so that it doesn't do this, which is fine if you only ever record with the camera mounted that way. It's a minor annoyance, since you can flip the video in post-production.

The GoPro software (Quik) is not nearly as powerful as the Insta software, but then Quik isn't trying to process 360 videos so most of the Insta features would be pointless. I may actually buy a GoPro Max at some point, at which point I'll be able to better evaluate GoPro's software on a level playing field.

The GoPro, unlike the Insta, allows you to use a USB cable to transfer files, which is way, way faster than wifi.

I will say that the 5.3K video output is awesome. I've attached a sample video below, but the upload to YouTube just seems to massively degrade the quality. There may be something more I can do, but that comes down to my ignorance rather than the camera's capabilities.

Summary: The GoPro so far seems to be a more stable, user-friendly, option. I'm not ready to get rid of my Insta just yet, because snowboarding videos really have to be shot with a 360 camera. But for mountain biking, the GoPro is my go-to.

B-Line run, Whistler


 

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The Hero10 is GoPro's newest addition to their line-up, and so far seems to have answered pretty much every criticism that people have had about the earlier models. It shoots up to 5.3K video and up to 240 FPS (not at the same time, though) for some great slo-mo or very fine detailed videos.

So, first, some background...

I bought a Rylo 360 camera a couple of years back. Nice camera, good price, great form factor. It came out with the first/best auto stabilization which took the industry by storm. Unfortunately Rylo didn't stay at the bleeding edge, and once everyone else copied the stabilization, that was it for them. The camera also suffered from some obvious shortcomings, like the inability to preview footage without a USB connection.

After that, I bought an Insta360 One X, which had all the features of the Rylo, plus the ability to control the camera and preview footage using your phone. But the One X suffered from a Teletubby form factor which caused a lot of shake on a mountain bike--too much for the stabilization to handle.

Next, I bought the Insta360 One R (starting to notice a pattern here?), which is an incredibly useful system. Modular in nature, you can swap out the 360 lenses for a 4K camera lens or a one-inch wide angle. I mostly love the One R and have used it a lot in both snowboarding and mountain biking. However, the 360 video, when exported, produces a relatively low-quality standard video. 1024x768 kind of low quality. So the videos were useful for my own review, but not really something I'd put on a blog.

I decided to try out the 4K lens instead of the 360 module. With the 4K, unlike the 360, you have to be concerned about aiming your camera, which is why I've tended to avoid it. Being able to just turn on the camera and edit the flow you want afterwards is hard to beat. But a little playing showed me that the chest mount is pretty bulletproof in terms of getting good POV.

So one of the problems with the Insta360 camera is that they tend to be flaky. It's a software thing, but sometimes they just randomly glitch. On one of my sessions a couple of weeks ago, I was struggling with the camera on almost every run. It would start recording then turn off, or disconnect from the remote, or refuse to start recording. On my last run, a truly awesome blast down Crank It Up, the camera locked up, and in the process of getting it back I lost the video. So I screamed invective at the heavens and ordered a GoPro (it's as good an excuse as any).

The GoPro is smaller and lighter than the One R, with a very similar form factor (wide brick-ish shape). It has a control screen on the back, and a preview screen on the front. The first thing to notice is the user interface on the control screen. Besides being bigger than the One R and having better icons, it is also more intuitive. The GoPro is also more dependable in that it hasn't glitched on me (yet, anyway). One issue that I'm running into is that the GoPro will sometimes record videos upside down, since I'm mounting it upside down on my chest mount. I think it has something to do with GoPro's horizon levelling feature. You can lock the POV on the control screen so that it doesn't do this, which is fine if you only ever record with the camera mounted that way. It's a minor annoyance, since you can flip the video in post-production.

The GoPro software (Quik) is not nearly as powerful as the Insta software, but then Quik isn't trying to process 360 videos so most of the Insta features would be pointless. I may actually buy a GoPro Max at some point, at which point I'll be able to better evaluate GoPro's software on a level playing field.

The GoPro, unlike the Insta, allows you to use a USB cable to transfer files, which is way, way faster than wifi.

I will say that the 5.3K video output is awesome. I've attached a sample video below, but the upload to YouTube just seems to massively degrade the quality. There may be something more I can do, but that comes down to my ignorance rather than the camera's capabilities.

Summary: The GoPro so far seems to be a more stable, user-friendly, option. I'm not ready to get rid of my Insta just yet, because snowboarding videos really have to be shot with a 360 camera. But for mountain biking, the GoPro is my go-to.

B-Line run, Whistler


The rear stabilisation looks pretty good. The footage looks average but like you said it's the transfer to YT. I'd imagine it's pretty sweet on computer. I have a GoPro Hero 7 Black and thinking about upgrading. It does the job pretty good and I have about 5 batteries for it. Heaps of video reviews saying Hero 10 has a tendency to overheat but in the snow whilst charging down the mountain it would be like being in a freezer. I find with my very limited technical ability that my best footage to use in SBF is I to do the run with stills at 1 second intervals. This gives me the highest resolution for a picture that I know how to do. I have some pretty good videos but I'm a bit too old to know how to get that into online format.
 

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Destroying Worlds Since 2015
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm going to try a higher frame rate when I get a chance. I've been going max resolution which limits my FPS, but if YT is downgrading the resolution anyway, I might as well try the other way around.
 

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Decided to put the GoPro Hero 7 out for retirement the other day and grabbed a Hero 11 Black (with 3 Enduro Batteries)...., waiting for it to arrive. Watched heaps of reviews, battery life seams good with Enduro as well as performance in cold weather. My GoPro 7 worked really good a few months ago and could run a whole day with just one genuine GoPro battery (probably an hour of footage). In Japan (-20C) it was only lasting 30 min.
 

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Received my GoPro H11 Black the other day. Ordered through GoPro and imported from their Singapore distribution Centre. Only took 5 days tracked and signed delivery. Pretty impressive speed through Au Customs.
 
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