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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I’m new to snowboarding and looking into getting my own board. The problem is, I have no idea what length is right for me. Im a female standing at 5’2” and weight approximately 185 lbs. The board that I started on was a 140cm which would be right for my height but not so much for my weight and I felt like I needed a longer board while riding. With my weight, it’s putting me at a length of around 150-154 cm. Would it be best to maybe find the happy medium with around a 145cm? Or go with the 150-154cm?
 

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Destroying Worlds Since 2015
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One issue to be aware of is that a given length of board has a range of stance widths that may not suit you. Board designs are based on average height/weight/inseam, so if you're not in the middle of the bell curve you have to be ready to compromise on some factors.

However, if the board won't give you a comfortable stance width, nothing else about it matters, really. So make sure you check that.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
One issue to be aware of is that a given length of board has a range of stance widths that may not suit you. Board designs are based on average height/weight/inseam, so if you're not in the middle of the bell curve you have to be ready to compromise on some factors.

However, if the board won't give you a comfortable stance width, nothing else about it matters, really. So make sure you check that.
Thanks I will be sure to keep that in mind!
 

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What made you feel like you needed a longer board?

IMO, I think for women the measurements often don't line up as well as for men. I'm 6'1 but ride a 159. It isn't quite as long as it should be but when I've tried a longer board it's too wide for me and I don't like how the stance feels. Boards of this length are designed for men and I'm clearly not one so I just went with what felt right for me.

I've heard some male riders of above average weight say they feel like they overpower the board and they need to go with a longer one. I've never felt that. I think it's best you demo a couple of different lengths to see what feels best for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What made you feel like you needed a longer board?

IMO, I think for women the measurements often don't line up as well as for men. I'm 6'1 but ride a 159. It isn't quite as long as it should be but when I've tried a longer board it's too wide for me and I don't like how the stance feels. Boards of this length are designed for men and I'm clearly not one so I just went with what felt right for me.

I've heard some male riders of above average weight say they feel like they overpower the board and they need to go with a longer one. I've never felt that. I think it's best you demo a couple of different lengths to see what feels best for you.
I feel like I would have more stability while turning and stopping with a bit longer board. Also, I’ve heard that if you are above the weight recommendations the board would flex more while riding. Would this warrant getting a bit stiffer board? And thanks I’ll keep that in mind!
 

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I feel like I would have more stability while turning and stopping with a bit longer board. Also, I’ve heard that if you are above the weight recommendations the board would flex more while riding. Would this warrant getting a bit stiffer board? And thanks I’ll keep that in mind!
Weight matters most, the board doesn't know how tall you are, only how much you weigh. There are extreme cases where this isn't exactly true, but for the most part weight is all that matters.

Donutz mentioned the stance width - if you can't get a narrow enough stance width on a board it's just not going to work at all. Foot size is another that can force a board decision, but you didn't mention that you have abnormally large or small feet.

You can make tradeoffs too. If you need a shorter board for the stance width (I'm guessing at 5'2" you're going to be comfortable at about a 21" stance width) you can get board where you're at the upper end of the weight scale, but look for something stiffer to compensate for that.

Look at men's boards too. My daughter (5'6", 125) rides a 149 men's board because she's an aggressive rider and loves bombing over chunder. We had her swap with my wife for a run and at the end she couldn't get off of the women's board fast enough - "it just chatters and bounces everywhere."
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Weight matters most, the board doesn't know how tall you are, only how much you weigh. There are extreme cases where this isn't exactly true, but for the most part weight is all that matters.

Donutz mentioned the stance width - if you can't get a narrow enough stance width on a board it's just not going to work at all. Foot size is another that can force a board decision, but you didn't mention that you have abnormally large or small feet.

You can make tradeoffs too. If you need a shorter board for the stance width (I'm guessing at 5'2" you're going to be comfortable at about a 21" stance width) you can get board where you're at the upper end of the weight scale, but look for something stiffer to compensate for that.

Look at men's boards too. My daughter (5'6", 125) rides a 149 men's board because she's an aggressive rider and loves bombing over chunder. We had her swap with my wife for a run and at the end she couldn't get off of the women's board fast enough - "it just chatters and bounces everywhere."
I wear a size women’s 8 in shoes if that helps. I live on the east coast and the snow is pretty much like straight ice most days. Thank you, I’m new to all this and I really appreciate any help I can get!
 

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For reference my wife has short legs and is 5'2" and rides a 21" stance. She has trouble getting snow pants that aren't too long. Best thing to do is get in a comfy athletic stance and have someone measure from the middle of one foot to another. The stance measurement is from the middle of the binding to the middle of the binding, if you're unsure.

By no means an exhaustive list, but this gets you in the ballpark:

Gnu Money 152 - entry level, 20.25" min stance width, hybrid rocker
Lib Women's Cortado 151 - hybrid rocker but more camber than the Money, 18.5" minimum stance width
Salomon Assassin 150/153 - camber with rocker tips, great all-around board, I know a few women who ride this.
Arbor Poparazzi Camber 152 - camber with raised edges making it more forgiving

First choice for ice: decide if you want hybrid rocker with magnetraction (Gnu and Lib Tech) for edge hold. Hybrid rocker is more forgiving for beginner/intermediate. The other option is some form of camber without magnetraction (other two options I listed). Camber is naturally better on ice than rocker, but less forgiving for beginners. Lib/Gnu tries to give you the best of both worlds by adding the serrated edge thing (magnetraction) to their hybrid rocker boards. Salomon and others go the opposite direction and makes the camber more forgiving by making the tips of the board flatter and less catchy (known as camrock or RCR). Arbor bends the tips of the board up on the side so it's less catchy. All three designs work.

My wife and both daughters learned in crappy conditions on hybrid rocker boards with magnetraction, and that was the right call for them because it offered the least amount of catchiness. If your existing board is already a camber board, however, you might not need that help.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
For reference my wife has short legs and is 5'2" and rides a 21" stance. She has trouble getting snow pants that aren't too long. Best thing to do is get in a comfy athletic stance and have someone measure from the middle of one foot to another. The stance measurement is from the middle of the binding to the middle of the binding, if you're unsure.

By no means an exhaustive list, but this gets you in the ballpark:

Gnu Money 152 - entry level, 20.25" min stance width, hybrid rocker
Lib Women's Cortado 151 - hybrid rocker but more camber than the Money, 18.5" minimum stance width
Salomon Assassin 150/153 - camber with rocker tips, great all-around board, I know a few women who ride this.
Arbor Poparazzi Camber 152 - camber with raised edges making it more forgiving

First choice for ice: decide if you want hybrid rocker with magnetraction (Gnu and Lib Tech) for edge hold. Hybrid rocker is more forgiving for beginner/intermediate. The other option is some form of camber without magnetraction (other two options I listed). Camber is naturally better on ice than rocker, but less forgiving for beginners. Lib/Gnu tries to give you the best of both worlds by adding the serrated edge thing (magnetraction) to their hybrid rocker boards. Salomon and others go the opposite direction and makes the camber more forgiving by making the tips of the board flatter and less catchy (known as camrock or RCR). Arbor bends the tips of the board up on the side so it's less catchy. All three designs work.

My wife and both daughters learned in crappy conditions on hybrid rocker boards with magnetraction, and that was the right call for them because it offered the least amount of catchiness. If your existing board is already a camber board, however, you might not need that help.
I have actually looked into the Lib Tech Cortado board and really like it. It’s definitely on my list of boards to look into when I make it back to my local shop. I was also looking into the Lib Tech Glider. I’m not sure if you know anything about it but if you do I would love to hear your thoughts about it.
 

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The Glider is full rocker (BTX) which is going to be very forgiving but not the best on ice. Something with some camber in the tips (C2E, C2) are going to be almost as forgiving but will have more edge hold in bad conditions.

I used to have a Gnu Pickle BTX and rode it on ice, so it's possible but you're going to have a better time on the other profiles I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The Glider is full rocker (BTX) which is going to be very forgiving but not the best on ice. Something with some camber in the tips (C2E, C2) are going to be almost as forgiving but will have more edge hold in bad conditions.

I used to have a Gnu Pickle BTX and rode it on ice, so it's possible but you're going to have a better time on the other profiles I think.
Thank you! I appreciate everything! So I should be looking for more of a camber/ rocker hybrid like on the Lib Tech cortado?
 

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Thank you! I appreciate everything! So I should be looking for more of a camber/ rocker hybrid like on the Lib Tech cortado?
I think that's better for ice, yes. Unfortunately the things that make things easy for beginners agent the best for ice so there's always a bit of a trade-off.
 

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From my wife, who had a bad experience on a camber board then switched to hybrid rocker (C2E Gnu Velvet) "I would get a rocker board even on ice...it was so much more forgiving and I was less likely to catch an edge so I learned way faster."

Now she rides full camber boards for the edge hold.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think that's better for ice, yes. Unfortunately the things that make things easy for beginners agent the best for ice so there's always a bit of a trade-off.
Gotcha! Thank you for taking time out of your day to help. I’ve really learned a lot!
 
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