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I was also struggling with this on my japan 2018 snow trip (first time snowboarder). I was on a rossignol district 2015 board as my learner board (20% camber in the middle and 80% rocker everywhere else). This was fine in furano where it was all big wide runs, but when we moved to tomamu there were a lot more cat tracks and I struggled big time on them.

I am planning my next trip now, is there a board profile that is more optimised for going straight down cat tracks? Any boards I should look at as my next board with this in mind? I plan on starting next trip with some lessons focused on this as well, but my wife and son loved these paths, especially the ones that went through the trees so I would like to do these more on the next trip.
Myself, I flatbase the cat tracks by twisting the board torsionally alternating toe and heelside with emphasis on the front foot. Like initiating a turn. Once you get a hang of it it's not a problem. I think it makes sense to not have a very stiff board, but I checked up that board you rode and they say it's soft and playful. So it's likely just your technique.

I totally get having a board that is good for riding in places that your family likes to ride, but I bet you don't just ride cat tracks. Focus on a board that you can have fun turning at their speed instead. My family also likes cat tracks or narrower, winding and faster green/blue runs, but we also ride wider more open pistes as well.

Could try something with lifted edges near the contact points. Like the Bataleon or maybe the Jones. Or just practice more :)
 

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My suggestion is to learn to be comfortable in the air, if only for a second but not to panic when it happens, and it will happen often in deeper chopped powder. Once you have no issue with that, you just need soft knees and to go with whatever you hit and not be in a panic to put the board back down. Look way down where you are going, sit down and stay feeling solid on your feet. Easy! :)
 

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thing that helped me with flat basing the most was :

- straight back
- arms at your sides
- upper body not twisted forward
- legs bend, but ready
- imagine you have a massive beach ball between your legs that pushes your knees as far forward over the front of the board (front knee) and backwards over the back of the board (back knee) as is comfortable
-- this puts even pressure across the whole board and, at least for me, helped to eliminate a lot of the twitchy-ness when flat basing at all speeds .. especially over rutted up terrain
 

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The Swiss Miss
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I'm still flat basing on the narrow parts though and catching edges :( Just need to practice some more!
To avoid catching edges going straight, either always have one edge slightly in contact and to soft transitions whenever nerded to keep direction, keep your weight well on front foot. Catching edges happens when front edge and hind edge are in "disharmony". If you are in the backseat, the front part of thr edge looses the contact and if it then suddenly gets contact - be it by small unintended off-balance weight shift or by a change of snow height/bumpd), it suddenly grabs. Bam. If you however are weighting your front foot, the edge is in contact and glides.

As others said, ride low so you have the ability to react immediately. You don't have to crouch, but knees need to be bent enough to react, absorb.

Avoid flatbasing (i.e. no edge contact at all) as long as you're not yet confident going straight with tiny little edge contact. Flatbasing will come with practice automstically when you built up the muscle memory to do all the balance/mini-adjustments. You can exersise it doing few meters flatbased, then put edge back in contact with weight well on front foot, go back few more meters flatbasing a.d.o.. The stretches will get longer by time.
 

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What he said. It comes with time and practice. You have the right idea, you have to stay on an edge.
Not necessarily, you can absolutely flat base the whole way to go straight. It just feels more secured on edge, for most people.

Yes, neutral stance in the cereal box, stacked and aligned with slight weight on the nose. And your knees slightly bent...AND loose knees, ankles and feet. You want your body flowing the line...being pulled by the chi. With your body parts being stacked, aligned and loose...you lightly float like a feather/arrow being shot from a bow. You want to keep your upper body quiet and flowing the line and your lower body loose and absorbing. When you are loose and neutral you can flow and react faster than being tight and stiff. Another thing, is to look further down the hill to where you want to go...instead of being focused (tight) on what is right in front of you...then you just float and trust the board and looseness of your body.
Always spot on.

One thing I observe is that when people think they are bending their knees and on "flat base", they are actually bending on the back and stick the butt outside of cereal box which naturally put them on heel edge (I would bet my money on them catching heel edge on cat track). And it's ok to feel wobbly when you flatbase compared to on edge, just get your composure and be loose.
 

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Also, flat-basing on low-angle green runs and cat tracks is really, really hard unless you have enough speed built up. It's like riding a bike; at slow speeds it's way harder to stay balanced and every tiny bump and rut is going to throw you off, and you're going to spend a ton of effort trying to stay balanced.

A lot of snowboarding is getting comfortable getting up to and staying at speeds where the things that are problems as a beginner at beginner slow speeds just aren't problems anymore. That comes with a lot of practice and even if you *know* what to do it's not going to help unless you've done it 1000 times. I taught a buddy to ride a few years ago and he's just now keeping up with me and realizing how much less exhausting it is to go fast.

If you want a board that will help you ride straight then traditional camber is your friend.
 

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CRC profiles are trick to flat base, even putting my weight on the front foot I was having a hard time until I started rocking the board and being more aggressive with my Lib Tech TRS.
RCR profiles are easier, just like flat to rocker and full camber. My flat base problems only happened with rocker between the bindings, and to avoid that: rock the board.
 

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The Swiss Miss
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CRC profiles are trick to flat base, even putting my weight on the front foot
Interesting. I don't have problems flatbasing any of my CRC boards (all qre NS, tho). Once weight is on front foot, they run smoothly
 

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Interesting. I don't have problems flatbasing any of my CRC boards (all qre NS, tho). Once weight is on front foot, they run smoothly
You are way more experienced than me, that's why you don't have problems flat basing :)
 

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I have trouble internalizing how to flatbase with bent knees. From standing straight up to bending my knees, I feel my shins push hard against the boot, making me go tippy-toe side almost immediately. In order for me to be flat on both feet with bent knees, I have to either
1. Bring my hips forward w/ my glutes with my back noticeably arched, as if I were dry humping the air or
2. Bring my hips back and sit slightly into a really high invisible chair, which is extremely exhausting on the quads.

Any cues I should be following otherwise? Or do I just have to fight my boots more?
 

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The Swiss Miss
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I have trouble internalizing how to flatbase with bent knees.
...
2. Bring my hips back and sit slightly into a really high invisible chair, which is extremely exhausting on the quads.
2. sounds good. And yes, it's demanding on the quads, thus I think you're on the right path.

Later on, when for example in need to keep speed over a long straight stretch, forget the high chair, use a low chair and squat as low as bringing the front thigh parallel to ground, weight mostly over front foot. That'll get you the most speed/distance covered.
 
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