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Discussion Starter #1
Well the time has come for me to finally get some expert training and tips. So where should one look for hiring a coach to help with training freestyle indoors, and what checklist should I have for applicants?
 

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What's your level of competition and current training? I had my son in a program here which had 12 athletes in the Burton open and tons of high ranking ski athletes but it's a joke for snowboard big mountain or up and comers. There were two kids, 14 and 16, in the us open from the program that had no coaching support. My son was top 10 in the country for his group(arguably the most competitive in USASA) for SBX and top 3 in the north America championships for big mountain. We didn't see his coach fir the last 6 weeks of the season.

We have now ditched the club and he has a personal trainer for summer dry land type training along with our usual regimen of biking and hiking. I also have a private coach for him now. He is someone I have ridden with, seen ride and is a very strong boarder.

When you look at applicants you have to see them ride. It's hard to respect someone and listen to them if your 12/13 and ride bigger lines and charge harder than your coach.

Make sure they are dedicated in general in life.

Be ready to spend some $$$$. If your serious about it and love it your gonna spend money. Do not ever depend on sponsorship. Do it cause you wanna do it. Free shit eventually comes but it may not be what you really want. Ride the shit you wanna ride, fuck free stuff.... Usually the companies will at least pro form you if your a competitive athlete.

Make sure the person is a good communicator and can articulate what they wanna say.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well for starters I have three strikes against me, all of which deal with me living in the midwest. I joined USASA this past winter and "faced the music" of my level after being injured (not from snowboarding) in 2008 requiring double hip surgery. USASA was a waste of money for me but an eye opener none the less. As for riding level I don't do rails, I love jumps, and basically a self-taught rider. I don't care about sponsorships at all (who needs that when you can just have fun?) if I get one good for me, if I don't, good for me. I just want to ride bigger and be able to throw hard tricks in control. Money isn't of issue for me just getting someone willing to train a inner-city kid is the problem. Most coaches in Wisconsin live well up north and I wouldn't want them to be taking such a commute for a 1 day a week session lasting only 1.5hrs(the time alloted for open gym at my training location). I'm always open to suggestions.
 

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If money is of no concern then star with summer camps. Woodward copper or Tahoe. Go to all of their sessions.... High cascade on mt hood is good too.... The coaching here, like everywhere, is as good as you make it.

From there something like my son did would be good for yo except I home school him so he didn't go to the "academy" Just the training. the training their is great for advancing to a new level, just not good if your going to be a traveling competitor. The programs are relatively cheap. Ski club vail is where he was.... They have a school too called vail ski and snowboard academy. Another one locally is team summit. Their coaching is a little more comprehensive through all levels of rider.

I'm sure some places up there have teams too. They will be nowhere near the level of a mtn team around here though.

If your not gonna dive in deep like this then just go to the local hills and get a freestyle cert coach. Doubt you have them in Wisconsin but if money is no option then make your way to a real mtn, breck and vail def freestyle coaches ready to give lessons all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
When I looked around for camps this summer, I just ran out of time to fit it in my clock, I work full time so I can't just go out and run away for a week, plus I have a trip to NY in August and life is currently a big time cluster $#@!. I will be moving to Valdez for college so maybe I'll be able to ride and train more often but it all depends on what life throws at me. I found a camp in Wistler that I liked more than the American camps and will give them a shot next year. In Wisconsin, specifcally Tyrol Basin does have coaches, but I rarely find time to get out there.
 

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When I looked around for camps this summer, I just ran out of time to fit it in my clock, I work full time so I can't just go out and run away for a week, plus I have a trip to NY in August and life is currently a big time cluster $#@!. I will be moving to Valdez for college so maybe I'll be able to ride and train more often but it all depends on what life throws at me. I found a camp in Wistler that I liked more than the American camps and will give them a shot next year. In Wisconsin, specifcally Tyrol Basin does have coaches, but I rarely find time to get out there.
Drop me a PM Wisconsin rider as well.
Home hill Alpine hit TB, GP

Have you asked the local network of riders if there is anyone at the hill that is willing to work with you. May not be a coach, but a great park rider. Sometimes beinging a great rider doesn't make a great coach but it can open up a network of getting to know great riders and maybe one of them wold be able to teach as well.

Like I said drop me a PM if you get a chance
 

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I found a camp in Wistler that I liked more than the American camps and will give them a shot next year.
As far as Whistler camps go I'd recommend Pro-Ride.com as the top one. The rest of the camps pretty much started after them and copied what they were doing. I'd say Pro-Ride has the better + more experienced instructors too.

If you need an email intro to the camp owner to ask some questions feel free to pm me, I can set it up.

Although that said, if money is really no object then I'd go even further than camps and go for pure 1 on 1 coaching in Whistler. Plenty of very good freestyle coaches in Whistler that will do a private with you. I can even give some recommendations if you need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I never reached out to other riders over the years due to my quiet-mysterious-lone-wolf exterior (I wear my mask all the time with goggles. Indoors too), not becuase I'm mean or too cool to ride with others I'm just a very shy and sensitive soul (dispite being 6'4 and 269lbs)
 

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I never reached out to other riders over the years due to my quiet-mysterious-lone-wolf exterior (I wear my mask all the time with goggles. Indoors too), not becuase I'm mean or too cool to ride with others I'm just a very shy and sensitive soul (dispite being 6'4 and 269lbs)
your here asking strangers advice not much different than a face to face asking someone a tip in the park line.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm about as strange as the come, I just find online talking easier than real time talking.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I discovered Pro-ride from reading your comments on another post and I find them more down-to-earth vs American camps with all their corporate lack of character. I plan to attend there next summer.
 

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This represents everything that is wrong with snowboarding currently. Ugh.
Move to Norway, there teaching and follow through with training etc is exceptionable...!

My Step son is 7 years old, gets 12 weeks of indoor, 16 weeks of outdoor coaching a season for the grand sum of 500 Nok ($85) a year...!!!

They are backed by DnB Bank and are extremely well run, with summer camps on Glaciers, Wakeboarding Days, Winter Camps (all extra cost), but reasonably priced, and the kids learn to teach as well as they grow through the program, meaning a never ending supply of competent well trained instructors...

At 14 we have other options available through fulltime education in dedicated Snowsport Schools at big resorts which is how Torstein Horgmo learned his trade.

I think it is the way forward, good academies that are only interested in the actual forward movement of teaching rather than profit.

KIF that i talk about here, actually owns 2 of the runs at the resort we use, and there is only 4 runs, a short slalom hill, a slopestyle park and a half pipe, but they earn no money from the hills from the resort, but the resort must maintain them to the clubs specs... Meaning we have good facilities when we need them...
 
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