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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im really stuck here - mainly because I have been watching waaayyyy to many reviews of boards and have a little analysis paralysis as I decide how to build out the quiver. How does everyone here do it?

1) Buy a new board each year to keep it interesting - keep the ones I like and sell the ones I don't?

2) Carefully decide what the quiver will consist of (carver, party board, free ride, all-mtn etc) and slowly add decks?

3) Another option?
 

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Everyone has a different "vision" of what a quiver is. Some are looking for a board for every condition. Some want a board for all styles of riding. Then there are others who want a quiver of boards for the way they prefer to ride. I am a rider who has a quiver of Free Ride boards. All of the boards I own are all ( but one ) directional Free Ride boards. I am a one who seeks out reviews from all sources to see if there is a consensus as to how a board performs. There are a number of members on this forum that I respect greatly as sources of quality reviews of different boards. I went about it slowly and tried to find boards that had something unique about their profile or performance. But all of them fall into the same category.Big Nose, tapered, set back, directional. Some might ask what is the point of such a quiver? I answer by saying that I am a narrow focus rider and all of my boards do the same thing, but differently. Example my S Rocker Burton Barracuda does not ride at all like my full camber Endeavor Next. But they are both Directional, Tapered Free Ride set back decks, but in no way do they perform in the same fashion.
I built my quiver ( currently 6 decks, one is a twin ) over a number of years. I once had a Lib Tech Landvik Lando that I sold as I was never comfortable with the profile of that deck. It was a solid deck, just not right for me. But to this point it remains the only one I have bailed out of.
Good luck with the project. It is a great one to be able to pursue.
 

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I’ve gone with a combo of 1 & 2, I started with a all mountain free ride deck as that was the best catch all for what I like to do most times. Then I looked for fun specialty decks, powder, volume shift/party, carver etc. I like to bucket decks I’m interested into those cats and then look for off season deals/lightly used etc. if I don’t like a deck I try to sell it and then will pick something up new

i don’t have a set number of decks or types, if I’m interested I’ll pick something up as I have little luck finding interesting demos in my size and really enjoy riding new stuff
 

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I started with one board that seemed to fit my desired riding style in the terrain I ride. After riding it awhile, I felt it had limitations here and there, and I began filling in those gaps with other boards. Like @Oldman, my quiver is specialized with a fair amount of overlap. This is dictated by where I ride and how I like to attack the mountain. They're all powder and carving boards. Even my twin is extremely specialized for carving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is what I needed to hear - I was so afraid of overlap that I thought I had to build out of quiver of different style decks. Example - love by Custom X but I'm also intrigued my the BSOD, Pantera, and Optimistic.
 

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This is what I needed to hear - I was so afraid of overlap that I thought I had to build out of quiver of different style decks. Example - love by Custom X but I'm also intrigued my the BSOD, Pantera, and Optimistic.
Isn't it funny how hobbies can get stressful! I have to remind myself that this is a silly sport where you slide down a hill on a plank and not to take it too seriously!

My current quiver

1. Yes PYL 164W
2. K2 Party Platter 157
3. Arbor A frame 170w
4. Endeavour Archetype 160w
5. Optimistic 157
6. K2 team manifest 164w
7. Moss snowstick mini long
8. Gnu headspace 155w
9. Jones Solution 169

tons of overlap in there, some I love more then others but never have regretted picking one up!

packing up for Colorado shot!

Building Interior design Wood Shelf Ceiling fan
 

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I went with a mix of: I want that board I don't know why (because hey, we're buying toys too!) and find boards that would motivate me to ride differently.

I've been on quiver killers almost all my life, riding each board until it dies. I never wanted to have the "wrong deck", so it was pretty much aggressive all mountain all the way. Getting into splitboarding changed my mind. Since freeriding feels much bigger on my split, I don't feel like battling for pow in resort and rather wanted to be back to my freestyle game. So I went with the Asymulator, which is quite softer and more playful than my usual and hopefully makes want to spin/trick a bit more. And I wanted a Korua because… I wanted it, so got I the CR9. Which again push me into carving harder on groomers and will be there for those dump days, where steepness and speed are not an option to float.

We'll see how it works out, both are brand new 😱
 

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This is dictated by where I ride and how I like to attack the mountain.
^^^This is the nutz of it. The mountain, its terrain, snow and how you like to ride it..is going to set the parameters of what you like/want in yer quiver. You are what you ride! Its better when yer tools fit the job. For my quiver, its mainly based on matching the various conditions and my skills...or not. Got an ice board, slush board, deep board, hotrod board and a flop and chop board, bc board and need a moderate pow tree board.
 

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Yeah, I started all mountain. I’m kind of an attack kind of guy when riding so the next board was freeride. Then came the carving boards followed by the fun tree board and powder board. It’s an obsession but so worth it. I pick my board now for conditions and mood. And I usually take two decks to the mountain in case my mood or conditions change.


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Custom Camber 158, Skeleton Key 158, Blur 159, National 156, Stale Fish 153, Alpha 158 - 8 Photon SO
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Im really stuck here - mainly because I have been watching waaayyyy to many reviews of boards and have a little analysis paralysis as I decide how to build out the quiver. How does everyone here do it?

1) Buy a new board each year to keep it interesting - keep the ones I like and sell the ones I don't?

2) Carefully decide what the quiver will consist of (carver, party board, free ride, all-mtn etc) and slowly add decks?

3) Another option?
You can drop a ton of money in one season like I did. But hunt for deals! Thinking about the type of boards you'd want for different conditions.

I ended up buying tons of boards last season but for good deals lucky enough able to sell maybe half of them for small to decent profits and helped pay for most of the boards I ended up keeping.

Edit: I was recovering from injury early last season so had tons of time to feed my snowboard addiction by deal hunting. Buying/selling...
 

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I prefer 2. My quiver is

159w Lib Tech Hot Knife - takes care of the bad snow days in the midwest no problem
155w Salomon Huck Knife - great park board and good enough for free riding when the snow is good
155w Flow Quantum - small and agile compared to my Hot Knife but more aggressive than the Huck. Good for aggressive days when the snow is good
123 Rosi Mini - A fun toy on the blues and greens when the snow is really good

Quantum is my old board. I bought the Hot Knife because I was having problems with the Quantum in bad conditions (I was above the weight limit and the brass edges are impossible to keep sharp). I ended up riding the Hot Knife solely for a while, until one day I was getting bored and thought I would try out the Quantum again, and I didn't realize how much fun it was to have a shorter, more aggressive (basically) true camber board (instead of Hot Knife's CRC).

Hot Knife is sold as a park board but honestly I just use it to carve, it's scary in the park, very unforgiving and catchy with the magnetraction. Maybe some people can handle it in the park but for me it's way too much. So I got the Huck Knife which makes doing park stuff a lot easier and lets me progress a lot better.

So now I have my old board (which is still fun), a good charging board, especially on bad snow days, and a great park board.

The Mini is just a fun toy, I walked into the pro shop and they had it for sale for $50 so I bought it. It's a ton of fun and it's a completely different feel, a lot more like wakeboarding than snowboarding (you will fall over forwards pretty easily if you lean forward)

I build my quiver with goals on what I want to do. I want to not get hurt in the park so I get a forgiving park board. I want to be able to ride when the snow is bad so I get a nice aggressive board. I think in the Midwest this is really all you need. The Quantum and the Mini are just fun accessories I've managed to snag.

I also have a Rome Artifact Rocker and I absolutely hate riding it. I tried a noodle rocker and it's not for me. But I experiment with end of season sales when I can find stuff for cheap. I think you just need a core quiver of two boards that can handle 99% of the riding you do on your mountain or hill (as opposed to trying to find one do it all), then just slowly get new boards and bindings and hand down bindings and stuff as time goes on. For me it's a board for icy conditions and a good park board. For you it may be a good charging board and a good powder board. But you should make sure they are different enough to really change the way snowboarding feels. Going from 159w Hot Knife to 155w Huck Knife is a completely different experience. And as much as I got snowboarding, going from Hot Knife to Mini feels so different I'm pretty much guaranteed to crash or stumble at some point just because they're so incredibly different.

So basically, my ideal quiver is two great boards and then building on it with fun things you find in sales. Quivers can get expensive because you need bindings too. But sometimes it works out. I had NX2s on my Quantum, put them on my Hot Knife, wanted more response, so I got NX2-GTs for the Hot Knife, then I had spare bindings. I put them on the Huck Knife, obviously not good for a park board, so I bought Flow Fuse on sale this summer. Now I put the NX2s on the Quantum, have good bindings for the Huck, and my Hot Knife is set up. And I bought Flow 5s on sale for the Artifact Rocker, didn't like the board, now they are on my Mini. And I still have my first pair of Flow 5s around, I could use them on the Artifact Rocker if I really wanted but I'd rather just sell it at this point, especially with these supply issues. I am selling jet ski parts I bought 5 years ago for a good profit right now lol.
 

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Look at your riding style and see how many days you essentially "dedicate" to a specific style of riding. If that really only comes down to something like; ride the whole, or it snowed, so ride pow on the whole mountain; then just get a really good one board option that fits the build of your riding and the terrain, and then a good pow boards. Where as like me if you have days you literally only carve groomers, get something for that, then days where you're ripping, hitting trees, going fast, get something for that. DUMP day, one for that. Medium pow and probably lots of tree, one for that. Park, one for that. About to go somewhere new and you really don't know what you're gonna get into, one for that. Chunder bust with some pow hunting, one for that...

If you're in a place that gets snow, and you ride park, a three board quiver makes sense.
Catch all that is optimized for you primary focus
Park board
Pow Board
 

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Definitely a combination of 1 and 2. It’s fun to have a quiver! Like last season when traveling was limited I added a few boards to my quiver to keep things interesting on my “local” resorts. My main board is a flagship 164 because it can do everything (that I want o do…). Besides that I have a directional twin, a dedicated carving board and a volume shifted board for tree run days.
 

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Truly need to add a carving/pow board. Was thinking of the K2 Niseko Pleasure or the Nidecker Tracer.
I use my Lib TRS for early days off the season, icy hard conditions and shled trainings I give for the ski patrol.
The Burton One Hitter for groomer, and nice conditions. But was fun at the end of the season over the slush.

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Thats kinda how I do it as well.
I love me them powder boards.
Then some I just buy because they're awesome, even though they might not be perfect for me.
Bought a Dupraz 6++ that has got to he way WAY to stiff for me, but it was a pretty good deal.
Now someone wants to trade me their standard 6 for it.
That works out perfect for me haha

TT
My strategy is impulsively buying any powder board I find a good deal on, more or less.

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