Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

101 - 120 of 128 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Thanks for your response. I followed your instructions and measured against a wall with a super tiny sock (didn't want to show you my super attractive naked feet ;) ). As I said mentioned, my boots are PERFECT at their size. I tried on size 8, 8.5 and 9 in my boots and they were insane tight because of my slightly wide feet. Currently, in my ride 92s 9.5 I have zero hip slippage, my front toes "lick" the tip of the boot and I feel great riding and walking (I got them molded to my feet, also highly recommend). Super happy and highly recommend the Ride 92s for anyone with similar feet for me.

You are right, every manufacturer is different and it's important to try on with snow/ski socks to find the right fit. I'm happy I have that with my boots.

My dilemma still stands between 156 and 152. I think the 152 will be a perfect board leaning on more park while the 56 will ride a bit better on powder. I'm pretty light so I think I should go down to 152 (they don't make this board in other sizes), worst case it'll be my park board at that size.

If you have any additional advice on the 56 vs 52 debate, please let me know. Cheers!
How old are your boots? I bet they will start feeling pretty quickly if they're new. Wiredsport is the guru at boot fitting. They should fit very tight when you are first getting them. I oversized my boots when I first got mine due to wide feet, but I'm dropping 1.5 sizes now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
How old are your boots? I bet they will start feeling pretty quickly if they're new. Wiredsport is the guru at boot fitting. They should fit very tight when you are first getting them. I oversized my boots when I first got mine due to wide feet, but I'm dropping 1.5 sizes now.
I got my boots this season. So brand new. I've ridden 6 times in them. They get better each time as they break in more. I know it's hard to believe but my foot is on the wider side and the size 9 boot were all killer tight. I couldn't even get the foot into a size 9! It just wouldn't happen haha. I do not enjoy that feeling in boots or shoes on my toes (as it leads to pain in the toe nails). It is what it is.

If my foot wasn't as wide I would def go down but I'm just happy I got a good boot, that works for me. I'll try on my friends boots sometime (size 8), they are adidas, we'll see if that works for me.

With my Smartwool ski socks, my foot is comfortable, secure, no pressure points. Also, these boots fit great with the matching bindings.

My biggest concern is the snowboard for now with my weight. All my friends and other riders I read about are 30-50 lbs more than me and they ride 157-162. I know I gotta get down a size, 152 and 156 will both work. So we'll see what I decide here soon. leaning 152 for more park riding
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,366 Posts
Thanks for your response. I followed your instructions and measured against a wall with a super tiny sock (didn't want to show you my super attractive naked feet ;) ). As I said mentioned, my boots are PERFECT at their size. I tried on size 8, 8.5 and 9 in my boots and they were insane tight because of my slightly wide feet. Currently, in my ride 92s 9.5 I have zero hip slippage, my front toes "lick" the tip of the boot and I feel great riding and walking (I got them molded to my feet, also highly recommend).
Hi,

Just touching the end is far too large. In a correctly fit boot your toes and heels will be firmly compressed into the compliant materials of the liner. You will not fit into your mondopoint size until you match both length and width. Heat molding will have no positive effect on boots that are too large. Heat molding requires a correctly fit boot to displace the heated materials.

Again, boot size is only one gear choice that should be based off of barefoot size. 26.0 cm is your actual foot length. This will determine the board width (at the inserts) that you should choose as well as binding size. This will remain true regardless of the boots size that you will choose.


STOKED
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
I got my boots this season. So brand new. I've ridden 6 times in them. They get better each time as they break in more. I know it's hard to believe but my foot is on the wider side and the size 9 boot were all killer tight. I couldn't even get the foot into a size 9! It just wouldn't happen haha. I do not enjoy that feeling in boots or shoes on my toes (as it leads to pain in the toe nails). It is what it is.

If my foot wasn't as wide I would def go down but I'm just happy I got a good boot, that works for me. I'll try on my friends boots sometime (size 8), they are adidas, we'll see if that works for me.

With my Smartwool ski socks, my foot is comfortable, secure, no pressure points. Also, these boots fit great with the matching bindings.

My biggest concern is the snowboard for now with my weight. All my friends and other riders I read about are 30-50 lbs more than me and they ride 157-162. I know I gotta get down a size, 152 and 156 will both work. So we'll see what I decide here soon. leaning 152 for more park riding

Then I definitely expect you to start getting heel lift in a couple weeks. If you get the wide boots as Wiredsport suggest, you will likely be able to go down in size without pain. Only Burton makes an EEE boot so pretty much any other boot will feel uncomfortable for you unless you oversize.

I was trying size 9 normal width boots, was able to squeeze into a size 8 Burton Ruler wide. Still getting heel lift after 15-20 days because the liner broke down so much, and my plan is to get 7.5 Burton Photon Wides next season after my size 8 K2 Maysis start getting too much heel lift as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Then I definitely expect you to start getting heel lift in a couple weeks. If you get the wide boots as Wiredsport suggest, you will likely be able to go down in size without pain. Only Burton makes an EEE boot so pretty much any other boot will feel uncomfortable for you unless you oversize.

I was trying size 9 normal width boots, was able to squeeze into a size 8 Burton Ruler wide. Still getting heel lift after 15-20 days because the liner broke down so much, and my plan is to get 7.5 Burton Photon Wides next season after my size 8 K2 Maysis start getting too much heel lift as well.
Thank for the advice. We'll see what happens as the season unfolds. My foot width at its widest point is approx 10cm, which is right at the edge of E and EE width. As of now, I have no issues at all. Could it be a half size tighter? Sure, possibly. But knowing my feet and toes that could lead to problems. So far so good compared to my previous crappy (way too big size 10.5 ride bindings from 2003...). I actually grew up riding and learning in those and didn't know anything else. I can tell you this much as well, they definitely were not sized 10.5 haha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Hi,


Again, boot size is only one gear choice that should be based off of barefoot size. 26.0 cm is your actual foot length. This will determine the board width (at the inserts) that you should choose as well as binding size. This will remain true regardless of the boots size that you will choose.


STOKED
Thanks, so based on my barefoot size, do you have a table or source for how wide the snowboard should be (at the inserts). I think that'll solve my dilemma
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Thanks, so based on my barefoot size, do you have a table or source for how wide the snowboard should be (at the inserts). I think that'll solve my dilemma
There's no exact formula, but with size 9.5 boots, it's unlikely you will boot out or have trouble controlling either a 152 or 156. The way I think about my board selection is I try to have each board with a purpose. If you already have a 157 (twin I'm guessing?), no reason to get another 156 as it'll beo similar. Get the 152.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
There's no exact formula, but with size 9.5 boots, it's unlikely you will boot out or have trouble controlling either a 152 or 156. The way I think about my board selection is I try to have each board with a purpose. If you already have a 157 (twin I'm guessing?), no reason to get another 156 as it'll beo similar. Get the 152.
Thanks so much for all the help! I agree with your thoughts and am leaning for the 152 Academy Team to start building up the quiver. I compared all specs (edge, vario, waist) with my current 157 NS Premier and the 152 is more fine tuned for me and not too skinny. More edge, lower vario by a lot (what I desire), only .5in less waist. Crazy how much boards have changed OR maybe it's just this board in a 152 fits me well. The 156 as you stated would be the exact same thing, no point. It's also crazy how dedicated I'm becoming to my craft. I used to just ride and not care about anything. But after getting new boots/bindings, it's time for a new dedicated board that'll fit me better.

The 157 is a directional twin (the board I grew up on and literally still ride, it'll get retired as my "rock board"). It honestly still kicks a$$. It's a NS Premier Carbon VX from like 2003 (too old to find catalogs). But it's a champ, I saw one on ebay for $250 starting bid haha. It's a full camber while the Academy Team has hybrid camber on the edges and IS a direction twin (also what I'm looking for).

I'm curious, what do you ride by the way and what boards are piquing your interest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Thanks so much for all the help! I agree with your thoughts and am leaning for the 152 Academy Team to start building up the quiver. I compared all specs (edge, vario, waist) with my current 157 NS Premier and the 152 is more fine tuned for me and not too skinny. More edge, lower vario by a lot (what I desire), only .5in less waist. Crazy how much boards have changed OR maybe it's just this board in a 152 fits me well. The 156 as you stated would be the exact same thing, no point. It's also crazy how dedicated I'm becoming to my craft. I used to just ride and not care about anything. But after getting new boots/bindings, it's time for a new dedicated board that'll fit be better.

The 157 is a directional twin (the board I grew up on and literally still ride, it'll get retired as my "rock board"). It honestly still kicks a$$. It's a NS Premier Carbon VX from like 2003 (too old to find catalogs). But it's a champ, I saw one on ebay for $250 starting bid haha. It's a full camber while the Academy Team has hybrid camber on the edges and IS a direction twin (also what I'm looking for).

I'm curious, what do you ride by the way and what boards are piquing your interest?
Arbor Iguchi Pro Camber 162cm
Lago Double Barrel 158cm
NS Swift 152cm

I'm 180 lbs. No more boards for now. If I do get a board, it'll be a soft buttery board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
DOPE lineup!

Thoughts on the Iguchi Pro? and thoughts on the NS Swift (why a 152?)
Awesome board. Getting it replaced under warranty due to top sheet cracking though. It's my go to board.

NS Swift is a sweet powder board that can handle groomers. Only struggles on bumpy terrain. 152 is since I wanted a short board to maneuver through trees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
looking to get a board for my girlfriend so she doesn't have to keep renting

She weighs about 140 lbs and is a beginner, I came across a good deal on a used 147 burton lux, think thats too small?

I think her ideal size would be 149-151? not sure could use some help
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,366 Posts
Thanks, so based on my barefoot size, do you have a table or source for how wide the snowboard should be (at the inserts). I think that'll solve my dilemma
You will want to compare your foot length (26.0 cm) less the adjustment for stance angle (typically about 1 cm depending on your angles) to the width of the board at the inserts that you are using (the reference inserts will be very close if you do not know). This will give you the actual amount of barefoot overhang that you will have.

Your adjusted foot length will be very close to 25 cm. To look at the first board that you had mentioned (Academy Graduate 155) it is 25.2 cm at the waist (already wider than your foot is long - but nothing happens at the waist). The board is 26.1 at the reference inserts. This is over 1 cm wider than your adjusted foot length which means that your toes and heels will be inside the confines of the edges. That is not advised. Riders with size 8.5 and smaller feet have their work cut out for them in selecting boards. Many opt from female specific boards if they are on the lighter side. Other go the custom route. Others search for the narrowest boards (inserts not waist) that they can find. There are many good threads on this forum about this issue.

STOKED!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Thank you for the tips. I myself being a rookie and new to snowboarding didn't know what to buy. After looking, researching and viewing some reviews I've decided to go with a burton instigator. Overall I am very happy and excited about my choice. I strongly recommend this board to beginners!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Crossroads w/ Board Selection

Hi All,

Beginner here. With rental boots and a Burton LTR, I got to where I was linking turns fairly decently, but the boots sucked and the board felt squirrely. So, I followed the wisdom of the forum and started with the boots. Per my measurements and @Wiiredsport’s recommendation, I now own a men’s sz 7 Salomon Diaglogue Wides. I’m 5’9” and about 155lb without gear.

I immediately went back out with those boots and a different rental board – they gave me a Ride Compact (I don’t know what length), which I was told was a very “forgiving” all mountain board and everyone loves it. Various specs/ descriptions say it’s a rocker (Evo says flat to rocker) and a “forgiving flex”…but holy cats did I get THROWN DOWN without notice almost immediately. I chalked it up to having (relatively) more responsive gear than before and picked myself back up, trying to pay more attention. I did start to feel pretty decent after a while, but every so often…DOWN. The last throwdown ended the day, followed by an xray to see if I cracked any ribs…fortunately not, but sneezing made me want to cry for about a month. The pain – and most of the fear of throwdown – is now gone and I’m ready to give it another go.

I’m interested in buying an all mountain board (I don’t foresee doing any park stuff – maybe small natural jumps when I have more confidence). I just want to commit to something and learn to ride it instead of having a different board every time I go. I understood based on all the reading that rockers were the most forgiving and easy for beginners, but something with camber was probably better to learn on from a technique perspective (though throwdowns were to be expected). With that, I was thinking of an RCR – some edge hold from the camber and some “forgiveness” from the rocker. But I just had a “forgiving” rocker board hand me my lunch…so now what???

I feel like I need to commit to a profile before moving forward, but based on that Compact experience, I’m really not sure what to do. A couple boards I had on my list were the Rossi Gala and the Yes Emoticon, both being RCR with Gala having less camber. Talking to people at shops only muddies the waters because they all recommend something different – suggestions from those folks are quite varied and not necessarily classified as "beginner"...although maybe that doesn't matter? Examples include: Frenemy, Gypsy, Wonder, Birds of a Feather, Twin Sister, Coda Camber….*head spinning*

I’m not asking you to tell me what to get, but maybe give some direction. Am I off track with looking at RCR, despite my experience with the Compact? Are there things I should definitely run away from?? Do I just pick *something* and move forward?

Thanks…and sorry for the long post!
Nina
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,778 Posts
just a general comment--don't forget to make sure your bindings are set up properly. If your boot isn't centered, or your angles are off, or your highbacks have different/wrong angles, you can have a bad time.

If you have proper boots, and properly set up bindings, and your board is the right size for you, you really shouldn't have any problems riding most boards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
My son is 15yo, 5'7", 122lb, boot size 28 mondo (I measured the sole from the outside and got 12").
He has been riding for about 4 years on St. Louis / Moonstone, (mostly on the slopes rather than the parks).

What board size range would be recommended for him?

Thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,366 Posts
My son is 15yo, 5'7", 122lb, boot size 28 mondo (I measured the sole from the outside and got 12").
He has been riding for about 4 years on St. Louis / Moonstone, (mostly on the slopes rather than the parks).

What board size range would be recommended for him?

Thank you!
I will be happy to help. Rider height is not a factor in correct board sizing. Also you will want to avoid using boot size. Weight and barefoot measurement are the two that we will need.

Please measure his feet using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Thank you Wiredsport.

My son already has boots that he is comfortable riding in. I am looking for board size recommendations and the reason I added boot size is for width/overhang considerations.
 
101 - 120 of 128 Posts
Top