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Discussion Starter #1
keep in mind this is like my second time ever holding a GoPro while riding. basically just riding groomers here and speed checking every once in awhile since i wasn't completely comfortable holding the camera.

i feel confident on heel and toe but i seem to ride my edges and kind of skid turn every once in awhile to speed check.

thanks guys.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSrkaqwtPCQ
 

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Riding on your edges are how you are supposed to be riding. So thats fine but you did appear to skid out all your turns instead of getting any smooth carving in. Does the speed make you nervous? I can't tell quite how fast you were going but you seemed to get nervous when you accelerated.

And I'm sure far better instructors and others with technical explanations are soon to chime in.
 

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ur abit rotated open in the shoulders, gots the invisable girlfriend, kind of sliding/ruddering the rear leg, not dynamic in the knees...and perhaps because of the gopro....doesn't look to be carving...just kind of swishing the tail back and forth...cause i didn't see any railing carves where ur getting angulated in the knees/hips. it seems ur not comfortable with railing speed and perhaps rightfully so because of lack of technique....intermediate level riding
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ur abit rotated open in the shoulders, gots the invisable girlfriend, kind of sliding/ruddering the rear leg, not dynamic in the knees...and perhaps because of the gopro....doesn't look to be carving...just kind of swishing the tail back and forth...cause i didn't see any railing carves where ur getting angulated in the knees/hips. it seems ur not comfortable with railing speed and perhaps rightfully so because of lack of technique....intermediate level riding
damn. ok. this is good insight.

now, where can i learn to correct these issues?

i've been riding, technically, since i was 17, i am 28 now. but i live in NJ and probably right 3-4x/year at MOST. some years, maybe 1x.

i am really looking to improve as much as possible. thanks.
 

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damn. ok. this is good insight.

now, where can i learn to correct these issues?

i've been riding, technically, since i was 17, i am 28 now. but i live in NJ and probably right 3-4x/year at MOST. some years, maybe 1x.

i am really looking to improve as much as possible. thanks.
You should be riding way more than 1-4x a year. Repetition is what makes you better at anything. If you ride one day, start to feel a little comfortable with speed or carving, then take a month off and ride again, most likely you aren't going to be continuing your progression. Try to make it to the hill once a week and youll see that after 3 weeks you're going to progress enough to motivate you to go more often.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You should be riding way more than 1-4x a year. Repetition is what makes you better at anything. If you ride one day, start to feel a little comfortable with speed or carving, then take a month off and ride again, most likely you aren't going to be continuing your progression. Try to make it to the hill once a week and youll see that after 3 weeks you're going to progress enough to motivate you to go more often.
i know man it is tough. i am more than 2 1/2 hours from any decent hills and closer to 4 for anything "good"
 

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ohhh...i'd think you'd have 11 years in...but ya, if you want to progress you got to go more often....like at least 1x/wk and at least 15+ days a year. as for my gezzerly self...it takes me 4-5 days to get back to where I left off the year before....generally going 1x/wk...for around 25 and hopefully more days/season.
 

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Taking lessons from a good instructor can fix small problems quickly. They will be able to see what you're doing wrong and on spot instruct you away from the bad habits.....
 

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huh?

i definitely don't think i need lessons and what do you know/care about what i spend money on?
Other than pro snowboarders, pretty much everybody benefits from taking lessons - some of the most advanced riders I know regularly take lessons/coaching.

I do not care what you spend your money on - but you asked how to improve your riding. Simple and honest answer is that taking lessons and riding more are by far the most important factors to achieve that - rather than investing in gear, debating boot flex and mid vs. base layers on a this forum, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Taking lessons from a good instructor can fix small problems quickly. They will be able to see what you're doing wrong and on spot instruct you away from the bad habits.....
never knew this. thought instructors were mainly for very beginners.

wonder if there are any decent ones here on the east coast.
 

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never knew this. thought instructors were mainly for very beginners.

wonder if there are any decent ones here on the east coast.
I usually take at least one lesson each year. Money well spent.
They help keep me on track. I am still in intermediate riding, I see the benefit at each lesson.

If Pocono's are not too far for you,, and $$ is a concern take a group lesson, most times their intermediate snowboard group lessons consist of just you and the instructor and cost around $30. Just like a private lesson only cheaper.
 

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The hard part is the 'good instructor'. When you don't have a home mountain that you hit frequently and have a chance to get to know the snow school it's hit or miss.

At your age unless it's people you know you don't want to be stuck in a group lesson with a bunch of kids. For one thing, you'll learn differently. What you need is someone who isn't afraid to point out what you are doing wrong and will grill you on it. Instructors will tend not to do that with kids, rightly so.

That brings you to privates. So at $100+ a pop make sure you talk to them so they can pair you up with the right person.

Consider some trips to Catamount or Butternut. They are right on the NY/MA border. Well over an hour closer to you than Mt Snow. They aren't epic mountains at 1000' vertical so you aren't going to go back to work on Monday and talk about your amazing trip, but are way cheaper ($250 for a season pass) and closer so you can up your frequency.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The hard part is the 'good instructor'. When you don't have a home mountain that you hit frequently and have a chance to get to know the snow school it's hit or miss.

At your age unless it's people you know you don't want to be stuck in a group lesson with a bunch of kids. For one thing, you'll learn differently. What you need is someone who isn't afraid to point out what you are doing wrong and will grill you on it. Instructors will tend not to do that with kids, rightly so.

That brings you to privates. So at $100+ a pop make sure you talk to them so they can pair you up with the right person.

Consider some trips to Catamount or Butternut. They are right on the NY/MA border. Well over an hour closer to you than Mt Snow. They aren't epic mountains at 1000' vertical so you aren't going to go back to work on Monday and talk about your amazing trip, but are way cheaper ($250 for a season pass) and closer so you can up your frequency.
thanks man. i have only been to Hunter, Windham, Belleayre and Plattekill for more local mountains.

i will check those 2 out.
 

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You ride fairly good, you just need to ride more and fix a few things. If you don't get a lesson then you need to ride with someone that is better than you and has the style that you like. When you ride with someone better than you they push you to be better and monkey see monkey do type of situation. I meet people every time I go, usually on a chair lift or the gondi and I end up riding with them if I'm solo. The more you work to improve the more you will improve.
 

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First off, watch this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvADH_dLb4w

When I watch you ride I am not seeing fluid carving. What you want to focus on is kicking up as little snow as possible while covering lots of ground laterally. When you see your tracks, they should be a single solid line, with very little rough snow. They should also be circular and tangent.

Figuring these things out really helped my riding personally. I watch other people ride who are way better than me, and study their moves. Getting a lesson in would probably be a good way to fast track this if you don't have a local mountain to practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
First off, watch this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvADH_dLb4w

When I watch you ride I am not seeing fluid carving. What you want to focus on is kicking up as little snow as possible while covering lots of ground laterally. When you see your tracks, they should be a single solid line, with very little rough snow. They should also be circular and tangent.

Figuring these things out really helped my riding personally. I watch other people ride who are way better than me, and study their moves. Getting a lesson in would probably be a good way to fast track this if you don't have a local mountain to practice.
ah ok. i often find myself actually trying to kick up a lot of snow. for some reason it reminds me of surfing and hitting the lip. so i guess i kind of snowboarding in a surf-y, skate-y type way.

thanks though! will work on it.


damn that dude can ride!!
 

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The hard part is the 'good instructor'. When you don't have a home mountain that you hit frequently and have a chance to get to know the snow school it's hit or miss.

At your age unless it's people you know you don't want to be stuck in a group lesson with a bunch of kids. For one thing, you'll learn differently. What you need is someone who isn't afraid to point out what you are doing wrong and will grill you on it. Instructors will tend not to do that with kids, rightly so.

That brings you to privates. So at $100+ a pop make sure you talk to them so they can pair you up with the right person.

Consider some trips to Catamount or Butternut. They are right on the NY/MA border. Well over an hour closer to you than Mt Snow. They aren't epic mountains at 1000' vertical so you aren't going to go back to work on Monday and talk about your amazing trip, but are way cheaper ($250 for a season pass) and closer so you can up your frequency.
I agree with good instructor part! I had lessons at Hunter mountain and Killington. At Hunter I didnt really like instructor instead of focusing on teaching he kept telling jokes and other "snowboard" related stories. In Killington instructor was very focused on teaching, but he was also very young and was easy with criticizing me. Maybe it's just me, I am just anal about everything and want to get most out of my money. I am going to try get a lesson this week in Windham see how it goes.

PS. all my lessons were group lessons, but out of 4 I had 2 of them one on one! 1 lesson had only 2 people and 1 had 3 people.

If you go on weekdays and take early lesson there is a high chance you will be the only person so it's almost like a privet lessons, it's just shorter. At the end of the lessons instructor also gives you a brochure with something like 50% or 25% off a privet lesson with him/her. My "privet" lesson at Killington was just lucky timing. It was weekend before Christmas and it wasn't crowded at all. There were a lot of skiers taking lessons, but only a few snowboarders and all except me were beginners, so I got lucky :D
 

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That's actually a good point about timing. Both times I've taken lessons I ended up with a private for the cost of a group. This is where age actually helps. They'll often times put you off on your own rather than mix you with the kids.

Beginning of the year is also great because the season is young and they have a ton of instructors they want to give experience to to get them prepped for xmas.

The nice thing about Butternut is you buy lesson vouchers that don't expire, even between seasons. Beginning of the year I bought a 4 pack which got me one free. Every time I go I go over to the school and talk to them to see what they have available. There's a few instructors I really like, if they aren't available I just don't use it that day.
 
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