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...but my used 161.5 Lib Tech T. Rice pro HP is no less flexible than my used 157 NS Proto. Both boards have roughly the same number of days on them.

I only made the comparison after playing with a new 160 Proto HD, and I was thinking how stiff it felt. I thought "that feels as stiff as my T. Rice..." So I checked. The new HD was indeed less flexible. My friends noticed the same thing. I just attributed it to new board vs. used board, but after comparing both used boards... I'm just not sure.

It just kind of threw me for a loop and changed the way I think about board flexibility, because I always used the "stiff" T. Rice for powder days and the "flexy" Proto for everything else.

Something else I noticed, which may be the reason for all this. The Lib seemed to have more rocker/less camber, i.e., when you stand on the back binding, the nose would pop up more.
 

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I've got a good joke about the flex test and "used boards" but that's probably not appropriate here.

You don't need to worry about flex in my opinion until you notice it affecting the way your board rides. If you're a park dude and that board can't pop you anymore then retire it. If you love shredding the hill and popping out of turns and your board isn't springing then dump it, you only get so many winters.

There is absolutely no point in ever flexing a board by hand, that will void your warranty on any Burton products with infinite ride;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not really worried about it. I just always assumed the lib was stiffer... and it is harder to press...

I just think some on here would be surprised to hear that they flex similarly.
 

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Flex varies quite a bit between manufacturers. Very still for one manufacturer might be middle of the road for another. NS has a tendency to run a little stiffer than industry average when comparing similar models. The Proto is definitely no noodle, but is on the softer side of the NS lineup. I love the flex of the Proto. Soft enough to butter, but stiff enough to rail a turn at speed on hardpack.
 

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I'm surprised to hear they flex similarly, especially considering the T. Rice Pro HP is 4.5cm longer.
 

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The Proto will break in significantly between 30 and 50 days.

No noodle, it definitely comes out of the factory pretty tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm surprised to hear they flex similarly, especially considering the T. Rice Pro HP is 4.5cm longer.
The Proto is a blunt tip and the T. Rice is a pointy tip, so effective edge wise they are pretty similar. I know the effective edge on the 160 Proto is longer than the 164.5 T. Rice...
 

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The Proto is a blunt tip and the T. Rice is a pointy tip, so effective edge wise they are pretty similar. I know the effective edge on the 160 Proto is longer than the 164.5 T. Rice...
For flex, are you talking longitudinal, torsional or both? My default for when someone mentions flex is longitudinal. In which case, how does a boards effective edge affect a boards longitudinal flex? I've been under the impression that it doesn't. So any insight is appreciated. My understanding is that it's surface area and weight that matters more, hence why the 4.5cm difference combined from the tail and tip seemed significant to me. For example, I can't have two of the same boards, one in 150 vs one in 160. If I take them both out, I thought the 160 would be stiffer due to the surface area, not the longer effective edge. How does the effective edge play a role?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
For flex, are you talking longitudinal, torsional or both? My default for when someone mentions flex is longitudinal. In which case, how does a boards effective edge affect a boards longitudinal flex? I've been under the impression that it doesn't. So any insight is appreciated. My understanding is that it's surface area and weight that matters more, hence why the 4.5cm difference combined from the tail and tip seemed significant to me. For example, I can't have two of the same boards, one in 150 vs one in 160. If I take them both out, I thought the 160 would be stiffer due to the surface area, not the longer effective edge. How does the effective edge play a role?
Longitudinal. I will test the torsional flex when I get some bindings on it and do some ground play. I could be wrong, but from what I understand about board pressing, all of the goodies that alter dampness and flex (carbon strings/bars, etc...) are within the boundaries of the effective edge. I think the width certainly would have something to do with it, but they are maybe 1 or 2 mm different in that regard, based on my measurements.
 

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It's gonna be pretty tough to test torsional flex in a store. You pretty much have to get some bindings on it and strap in to be able to apply the torque you need to get an idea on torsional flex.
 

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Flex tests are even crap on a carpet. I'm a fucking butter monster on the carpet. But when I get it on snow the flex patterns are all over the map with different boards.
 

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flex tests really dont count for shit.. whole different story when the boards moving, sliding on snow and being flexed naturally as u turn, pop etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Flex tests are even crap on a carpet. I'm a fucking butter monster on the carpet. But when I get it on snow the flex patterns are all over the map with different boards.
flex tests really dont count for shit.. whole different story when the boards moving, sliding on snow and being flexed naturally as u turn, pop etc.
Yep... as the title states.

But don't tell me you wouldn't be surprised if you picked up your stiff powder board and it felt more flexible than your park board...
 

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Another thing that is important is WHERE it is flexing. You can angrysnowboarder-style bend a deck that will then ride like a plank simply because of where you are exerting pressure.
 

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Yep... as the title states.

But don't tell me you wouldn't be surprised if you picked up your stiff powder board and it felt more flexible than your park board...
not disagreeing with you. i picked up my 2012 lib t.rice pro 161.5 and flexed it and actually find it a lot more softer than my 157w k2 parkstar, but when riding its completely different. different patterns for different styles of board and riding. when riding, the parkstar "feels" softer while being a stiffer deck and vice versa for the lib. could be something to do with the sandwich construction of my lib giving it greater edge hold whilst my parkstar has a cap construction in the tip and tails making for a more forgiving ride. theres a lot more that makes up a board than the flex which is why hand flexes should be considered with a grain of salt.

interesting topic none the less. always fascinates me how designs and materials can make such a difference.
 

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Yep... as the title states.

But don't tell me you wouldn't be surprised if you picked up your stiff powder board and it felt more flexible than your park board...

Unless they're noodles I find I can't tell the difference between various boards and trust me, I try :laugh:
 

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From my experience. The NS boards have a softer flex between the bindings then other boards. You can literally see the bend in the center. I think that's why they added that honey comb insert you can see in the base of the proto HD. The cool part about buttering and pressing the proto is that rocker flex section between the bindings allows you to lift the tip/tail effortlessly and when you put a little weight back it supports you much better and your butters/presses have more control and confidence without sacrificing the damp aggressive poppy feel when riding normal.

NS boards got to be broke in. I've spent a few months messing around in my park thing I made with my Proto HD and it still isn't broke in. My SL took almost the whole season to break in. Wait till you ride it. You'll see the difference.
 

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That "bend" in the center of NS boards is just part of the camber profile. The RC profile makes them feel softer in the center when buttering, but when you lay into it in a turn that stiffness is still there when you need it.
 
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