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Totally normal to take a couple seasons of 3-4 times out to get off bunny hills.

Some people learn a little quicker or slower, but it just clicks eventually.

For me, I learned that riding an edge all the time at first kept me from catching an edge and you can usually see snow starting to pile up on your board if you are about to catch one... oh and always fall up hill if your going to fall...

Stick with it, it will be worth it ?
 

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Try buying a decent beginner board instead of rental boards especially those burton learn to ride (LTR) boards, they're awful. I used rentals for the first two seasons. Did i link? sure, but was I confident in linking? no. I just bought bum pads and wrist guard so I could push myself harder...

Once I bought a decent beginner RCR board with good edge hold on ice, then bam! it clicked! suddenly the ride felt stable, turning was easier, going on cat tracks wasn't catchy. Confidence just sky rocketed and linking turns wasn't scary anymore.

Sorry Burton, but your LTR board was counter intuitive for marketing. I've already associated "Burton boards" with "bad experience".
Your bindings however... those i like lol.
 

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So on the bindings look for the adjustment that tilts the highback in - have a bit of forward lean on that highback and that should help you out with board response.

Wearing the impact shorts for your tailbone and wristguards is smart. Warm your body up a bit before you start riding and stretch a little too.

Highly recommend taking up skateboarding in the summer...alot of the basic stuff in snowboarding comes a ton easier if you can skate. Doesn't have to be fancy flippy trick skating...just cruising around and some gentle downhill carves...getting off lifts is no issue if you can already push yourself around with one foot on a skateboard. Wally mart board does fine for all that if you decide to try skating in the summer....doesn't have to be expensive (unless you get yet another board sport addiction).

Those Arbor foundation beginner boards are pretty catch free...maybe consider one of those or something with a similar design. Look for the Angry Snowboarder videos on youtube and watch their beginner board and bindings reviews (and alot of their other stuff too...you will get edumacated in the tech and that should help you out for getting good gear that works for you).

The boots are critical...listen to the people here telling you about boot fit...go look at the boot fit forum please. If you are smart and lucky you will get fitted first and buy the correctly sized boots first before anything else (yes really).
 

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Hello! I have been snowboarding for a season, and have taken around 4 lessons. I'd say I have nearly 20 hours of on-board experience and can barely make it down a green (the first time I went down one was my 6th (and most recent) time). I fell all the way down my first time (but still made it down) and the second time I caught an edge when I was going fast and stayed down for a good 4 minutes. Needless to say, I was done at the point (in my defense, it was extremely icey). It is getting very frustrating putting in all this time and money to stay on the bunny hill, and I don't understand why I am not doing better. Is this normal?
So I am bored in quarantine and found this thread from 2019. How did the 2020 season go? Were you able to get on the mountain and make some progress?
JR
 

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Maybe your bunny hill is too flat.

It's a bit like with bicycles... if you're very slow, they get hard to balance. Same with snowboards. Overly slow leads to hard to balance leads to leaning stiff legged on back leg fearfully awaiting a fall which then does lead to a fall.
3. Get on the blue slopes. It's a lot easier to traverse a steeper slope than it is to go straighter down a gentle slope as it forces you more on the edge of the board, which is the safest place to be.

5. Put a lot more weight on your front leg when initiating turns than you think you need. Try leaning over the nose of your board as far as possible whilst standing on the flat & you'll see just how hard it is to go out the front door.
4. Agreed that some bunny hills are too mild... especially beginning. Having some steepness makes it easier to initiate your turns and lean into the slope... which also helps you work on constantly working down the hill switching from heel-side turn to toe-side... etc.
Some awesome advice here, from many seasoned riders, but a cursory glance of the first page of this thread, saw me poaching excerpts from the above 3 posts.

I firmly believe there IS such a thing as "too flat". Not to brag (because I'm NOT a pro, I'm not even that good), but I learned to ride in Purgatory CO (I think it's now called Durango Mountain Resort or something). I took a lesson in the morning (front foot out for all turns, front foot out linked turns, boom - get your ass on the chairlift now, Scotty). Those runs, for a newbie, were quite steep, but I found that once I could just ACCEPT that I was going to be traveling a little faster than on the flats down the bottom, the intermediate run grades made it WAY more effortless to engage the edge of the board, and get a feel for the dynamics of snowboarding - hell, all I had to do, was to stand upright, and I was already on edge!

I would suggest experimenting with going to steeper runs, hopefully in soft conditions, where you can let the board off the leash a little (allow for some gathering of speed), commit to the motions that you've learned during your lessons, and see how that feels. I would bet that you will be pleasantly surprised, and that it will click a little easier.

Also, as mentioned above - weight over your front foot, as much as possible! This is, hands down, the biggest things I stress when I teach someone how to snowboard (casually - I'm not a currently licensed instructor). I stress the shit out of this point, and I've NEVER taught anyone who hasn't been able to link turns, after a few hours with me (except for this gorgeous, gorgeous Russian girl on whom I wasted SO much precious time on, but apparently putting up with her arguing with me about technique, even though she is a novice, was totally okay, thanks to how fckable she was. God I was dumb).

And as others have mentioned, don't give up. You'll have painful days, days where you're not feeling it (no probs, just take it easy and prioritise QUALITY of runs, as there's no need to do 1 million runs on those days), and magically, days where you've found a rhythm and now you're getting it. THOSE days are not too far away :)

EDIT: I didn't look closely enough to realise that this was an older thread. My brain is being weaksauce these days.
 

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^this is so true.

I was "trying" to learn switch, too, the last few seasons. "Trying" means, I did try few switch turns here and there, maybe 20 spread over an entire season, which equals to zero progression. Had all the excuses to not practice, too crowded, too steep, too shallow, too icy, too whatever.. honestly, it just sucks to go back being a falling, sideslipping, fearful stiff legged backseat not daring to do a toeside turn noob, if you're good fwd, lol.

But two days ago, I just made the decision to dedicate a full day to switch and won't find excuses to turn around. Period. First three runs sucked. The runs were incredibly exhausting on my mind, required so much conscious thinking of which part of the body to use at which time point... (I'm not used to that anymore, as fwd, it all comes natural) and frustrating as I slipped around, fell, a.s.o.. But it was worth it to continue. With keeping at it, concentration on knees (watch the creepy basement video @wrathfuldeity posted in other threads, so you know how to use knees) and initiating turns consciously with shoulders (you automatically turn to where your front shoulder points to if loose in your knees, weight on front foot), on run 4, it clicked; I finally overcame the fear pointing nose downhill in frontside turns, dared to use more speed and begun to feel the edge. More speed makes it so much easier to turn smoothly. Then with each further run I felt how the fifferent body parts begun to align, how, after knees and shoulders, hips begun to add work into it, how toes begun to fine tune balance etc. At the end of the day, I could even do an occasional carve on edge on toe and heel side, muscles had begun to understand what they should do, how to work together to keep balance following the radius of the edge.

Long story short: On this one - extremely exhsusting - day riding switch non stop 8:30-16:00 I made 100times the progression than in all the "tries" the seasons before.

So... get a good private instructor on your next trip on the first day. Let him correct your errors and explain how you should. And then keep at it that day, practice all day, no excuses, ride ride ride, and concentrate on what you do. It's exhausting, but worth it. At first, your mind needs to teach your muscles. Once they have it in the muscle memory, it begins to be fun. But they only learn by repetition.
I've probably ridden more in the last couple of season than in the 10 seasons before and my switch riding has come on leaps and bounds to the point where i was carving on blue runs this season (spending a couple of months getting my casi 2 lsat season which helped). The thing that made it click for me is when one of our coaches said "don't think of it as riding switch, it's just riding in the other direction". It's all the same body movements just looking in the other direction.
 

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I agree with what @neni said. You need to force yourself for a couple of hours in a row to practise switch. It’s tiring because you need to be deliberate about all the basic moves your muscle memory is usually doing for you when riding your typical direction.

My best single switch riding progression was 2 seasons ago. I hit the nerve in my right leg (I’m goofy) that runs laterally in between your hamstring and quad. A very unlucky fall but I literally couldn’t put more than 20-30 % of my weight on that leg till the end of the day and we were in group, driving 150 kms and still 3-4 hours to ride so I didn’t want to drink beers alone for that long. It was on Salomon Assassin 2018, a true twin with 15/-15 bindings so I just decided I’m gonna try switch. That way I had to ride very front foot heavy because riding with more less equal weight distribution was unbearable.

Apart from the fact that every chairlift ride was ending with a controlled fall while getting off (I couldn’t leave it neither goofy due to the pain in the right leg nor regular due to the lack of switch skill), I’ve progressed from almost 0 to scarving heelside and some carving toeside in these 3-4 hours on mellow runs.
 

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Funny moments when one just has to lough about oneself...
K. Doing turns switch are not that big of an issue anymore; let's go wild. Now do ollies, switch. Lol.

Brain: hop!
Hind leg: deaf
Brain: hey! Here's brain calling hind leg! Answer! Hop!
Hind leg: FU, I'm occupied with this strange turning stuff!
The conscious me: 🤣
 
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I'm turning 56 soon and a fear of getting hurt and ruining the rest of a holiday is also a big limitation in progression. Last few days, totally different, go for it but I found after a bad injury last season the biggest thing holding me back in my last 5 week Japan stint was that I was not pushing hard enough. On a groomer day I tend to ride switch 50% of the time doing hard carves both switch and natural but I never actually slid out downhill once which I means I simply was not pushing hard enough. Was doing J turns no problem but if you don't fall, you are not riding or learning as quickly as you can I think. Having said that, you don't bloody heal very well when your old either as some of you will learn one day :)
 
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