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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Starting snowboarding this season after switching from skiing. I have tried snowboarding and love it so ill probs go again next year too. Is it worth getting a good board now and skiping the "beginner boards"?

Im looking at either a 2013 160w ride manic/maybe wild life for 220, or i can go balls deep and get a 2013 160w k2 turbo dream for 300 (unreal deal just sayin).

Also ride ex bindings or union atlas? I always hear good things from both. Only problem i have with bindings is im the middle of all the binding sizes, im size 11 in boots. m/l is usually 8-11 then l/xl is 11-14/15, do i get m/l or l/xl?

My soon to be setup hopefully:
turbo dream/ride manic - board
vans encore - boots (they fit my wide feet well)
ride ex/union atlas
 

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Starting snowboarding this season after switching from skiing. I have tried snowboarding and love it so ill probs go again next year too. Is it worth getting a good board now and skiping the "beginner boards"?

Im looking at either a 2013 160w ride manic/maybe wild life for 220, or i can go balls deep and get a 2013 160w k2 turbo dream for 300 (unreal deal just sayin).

My soon to be setup atm:
turbo dream/ride manic - board
vans encore - boots (they fit my wide feet well)
ride ex (heard its good)
I would suggest buying the most comfortable boots you can. Put your money into your boots. You want your experience to be an enjoyable one. Because you won't know the subtle differences in boards the only real concern should be to be comfortable. Keep dry and warm. I'm sure you know this from skiing but either way, don't be too concerned with your first board. If you stick to it, once you feel confident, get to your hill on demo days and try other boards before committing to your next investment. Any all mountain board, camber or hybrid will be fine. If you ride enough, you'll figure out what suits you in the next few years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would suggest buying the most comfortable boots you can. Put your money into your boots. You want your experience to be an enjoyable one. Because you won't know the subtle differences in boards the only real concern should be to be comfortable. Keep dry and warm. I'm sure you know this from skiing but either way, don't be too concerned with your first board. If you stick to it, once you feel confident, get to your hill on demo days and try other boards before committing to your next investment. Any all mountain board, camber or hybrid will be fine. If you ride enough, you'll figure out what suits you in the next few years.
Yea i tried some boots on, the vans encore fit me the best and as an added plus they look really cool.

Soooooo dont get the turbo and just get the manic till i can tell what boards i want?
 

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I would get a good beginner board now that you have found comfortable boots. Something with a rocker tip and tail and flat between the bindings. The lifted tip and tail will be less catchy and more forgiving when you are learning to link turns heel to toe and vise versa.
 

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If any of the hills near you offer a demo day take advantage and go ride as many boards as you can to get the feel of different brands and models.
 

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If any of the hills near you offer a demo day take advantage and go ride as many boards as you can to get the feel of different brands and models.
He's just starting. That would be impossible to tell the difference until he learns to at least ride and link turns.
 

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Save your money get the boots that make your feet happy... buy a season pass to your local mountain and demo every board you can until your skills develop into your style of riding... then start board shopping because by then you should have a pretty good idea of the type of board that will best suit your style... I also recommend learning on an old school camber style board the cheap rental pile as this IMO will help refine your board control...
 

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Buy a good quality board in the beginner intermediate range. There's no reason to sink a bunch of cash into a top of the line, or tech heavy board as they're designed for an experienced rider and in some cases can hold a beginner back. I'd even look into a used, or new previous season deck.
 

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board means nothing if its within 5cm of your weight range. Buy a cheapo off craigslist or somesuch. When you actually know how to link turns and get some airs, then you will have a basis to go from.
 

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OP, if you still can't link turns, I would recommend just buying boots and renting the board a few times until you can turn a little bit. That way you can actually demo some boards to see what you like. Even if it is just testing the difference between a camber board and a rocker board, or two different sizes of the same board... being able to link some turns will let you know which style you like more (likely rockered or hybrid). The board you like on your 2nd day will be different from the board you like on your 10th day which will be different from the board you will really need on your 30th day of snowboarding.

Usually renting boots is a separate charge from renting the bindings/board, so buy the most comfortable boots you can find. Avoid pressure points, make sure your toe touches the end of the boot without curling and when you try to stand on your toes your heel doesn't lift very much. If you do that, your whole learning process will go much better due to a correctly fitting boot. Not to mention it's way easier to fully suit up, and just go rent a board w/o boots.

While you may lose a little bit of money to rentals the first few times you ride (make sure you take a lesson), you will be much better off when it comes time to make an official binding/board purchase.

What size is your foot in a street shoe btw? Going for a wide board may slow your progress if you don't really need it.
 

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It depends on your level of skiing, if you are an expert level skier that easily handles double blacks, trees, blasting groomers and etc. The get an all mtn advanced stick...something like a gnu rider's choice or of some other brand. The reason being, you all ready know edges, terrain, speed and snow. So you just need to figure out sliding sideways instead of facing the fall line. If ur a crap skier...then get an intermediate board. Only get a beginner board if you have only literally skied only a few times or less than a 25 day season.
 

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Then apparently you can sign them, run into a tree, then sue the mountain for not being psychic.


mmmmm... psychic mountain.....
...would be a good name for a band. :laugh:

But yeah, I'm trying to avoid that situation, if you can believe it. :huh:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Save your money get the boots that make your feet happy... buy a season pass to your local mountain and demo every board you can until your skills develop into your style of riding... then start board shopping because by then you should have a pretty good idea of the type of board that will best suit your style... I also recommend learning on an old school camber style board the cheap rental pile as this IMO will help refine your board control...
If i wait to demo boards then i miss all the sales they have right now which is why i want to buy a board now. Im 18 so i dont think i can sign for demos by myself in canada yet as well. I feel like the difference in the "tech" (Half the "tech" sounds like complete and utter bs, banana rocker infrastructure with bambooyah flexability. Who comes up with this shit, a bunch of stoners in a workshop with too much time on their hands lol?) doesnt make that much difference and its mostly just the quality put in the board (like what wood they use, board protection, etc).

Random info about me im 6'2"ish and weight 180 pounds cus i know some of you asked. Feet size in regular nike free runs is 11.5-12, the vans encore 11 was perfect fit and my toes were just touching the end barely
 

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If you have the money, go for the board your stoked with. When I was a child, I got a Ride Jeff Brushie 153. Way too fucking big, but I jibbed, jumped and bombed it for years. You will learn to ride anything. Have fun man.
 

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If i wait to demo boards then i miss all the sales they have right now which is why i want to buy a board now. Im 18 so i dont think i can sign for demos by myself in canada yet as well. I feel like the difference in the "tech" (Half the "tech" sounds like complete and utter bs, banana rocker infrastructure with bambooyah flexability. Who comes up with this shit, a bunch of stoners in a workshop with too much time on their hands lol?) doesnt make that much difference and its mostly just the quality put in the board (like what wood they use, board protection, etc).

Random info about me im 6'2"ish and weight 180 pounds cus i know some of you asked. Feet size in regular nike free runs is 11.5-12, the vans encore 11 was perfect fit and my toes were just touching the end barely
There is definitely an excessive amount of variations in technology, but for people that ride a ton, each little difference makes a big deal. Lib tech boards are amazing boards. Gnu is their off brand. I have purchased a new board every year for the last ten years and am finally happy with the boards I have. Stiffness is huge. Camber vs rocker is huge. Twin vs set back stance makes a big difference in park riding. Magnetraction rules on hard pack. And I have a pow board for pow days. As you learn, different boards will serve you differently for the many variations in snow conditions. All mountain boards with camber or hybrid camber will set you up for the most success as you learn and get better. Nitro, capita, ride, never summer, salomon, Rome etc all make great boards. I have the same size feet. I ride a 161w lib tech attack banana for the groomer park days and a 163 salomon sick stick for pow days. Love the combo camber rocker and Magnetraction. You can buy a good board, just buy used. It will take time and most likely if you fall in love with snowboarding, you too will be buying new boards every year or other year. It's a great obsession.

Ps. Watch out for girlfriends. They're no fun to teach and they require money

Happy riding!
 

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If i wait to demo boards then i miss all the sales they have right now which is why i want to buy a board now. Im 18 so i dont think i can sign for demos by myself in canada yet as well.
I agree with you about the tech sounding out to lunch. C2BTX, Banana, Squeezebox, it's annoying. Nevertheless there are differences in boards that are noticable. Why would you think at 18 you can't sign a board demo?!? You can drive a car on your own at 17, you can drink booze legally in multiple provinces, you can buy porn and lottery tickets. Why can't you demo a board again?!?

Also, now is not sale season. March/April is sale season. Get something cheap/used that's the proper length for a noob with your height and weight, and pick up the board you REALLY want in the spring. My guess is that what you want will change before then.

Magnetraction rules on hard pack.
Says SOME people, but not all... :giggle:
 

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If i wait to demo boards then i miss all the sales they have right now which is why i want to buy a board now. Im 18 so i dont think i can sign for demos by myself in canada yet as well. I feel like the difference in the "tech" (Half the "tech" sounds like complete and utter bs, banana rocker infrastructure with bambooyah flexability. Who comes up with this shit, a bunch of stoners in a workshop with too much time on their hands lol?) doesnt make that much difference and its mostly just the quality put in the board (like what wood they use, board protection, etc).

Random info about me im 6'2"ish and weight 180 pounds cus i know some of you asked. Feet size in regular nike free runs is 11.5-12, the vans encore 11 was perfect fit and my toes were just touching the end barely
Doesn't make that much of a difference? Just 'cause you don't understand shit, doesn't mean it's all nonsense. Yeah the names are weird, but if you actually do some reading on it, every piece of tech has it's place. Commenting that "banana rocker infrastructure" is utter bs shows how little you really know about the purchase you are about to make... thus enforcing the need for you to heed the advice of people here. Board protection --> Do you want a sintered or extruded base? Do you know which one is more durable? Which one is generally faster? Rocker(banana)/camber --> which one is more stable? Which is easier to turn? Which is better in powder? Hybrid camber --> is this the best of both worlds? what are the different hybrid profiles?

Are you willing to jump into a $400... $500 purchase without giving a crap about what you are buying? If so, then we don't really need to waste our time trying to help.

Just buy this one --> 2014 Mystery Camber Snowboard | Burton Snowboards
 
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