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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I’m new to the snowboarding scene and have fallen in love with it!

There is a board pack for sale however I’m not sure if it’s a good board for me to start out on.

I’m 5’8” - 70kg so I’m thinking of a 153-157cm board? The board I found is a 155 Burton Cruzer however not too sure on the specifics or what the details are and so I’m asking you experts what your thoughts are and hopefully you can bestow your wisdom on me.

157054
 

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Pretty sure the Cruzer was used as rental boards in a lot of places, they’re Rocker boards and soft IIRC but they must be bomb-proof. They’ll be fine to learn on but they probably will limit your progress where soemthing with a hybrid camber profile might last you a bit longer. I might also have this board mixed up with another.

probably comes down to budget, type of riding you may want to do and how much boarding you’ll get in throughout a season.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Pretty sure the Cruzer was used as rental boards in a lot of places, they’re Rocker boards and soft IIRC but they must be bomb-proof. They’ll be fine to learn on but they probably will limit your progress where soemthing with a hybrid camber profile might last you a bit longer. I might also have this board mixed up with another.

probably comes down to budget, type of riding you may want to do and how much boarding you’ll get in throughout a season.
Cheers for the heads up, very helpful! In which way would you say it will be limiting?
The board is a package with shoes and bindings for around £250/€300/$350 so I think pretty fair.
I don’t intend on using the board for any parks or jumps but nice cruising down slaloms and something that doesn’t catch an edge too easily when learning.
 

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Cheers for the heads up, very helpful! In which way would you say it will be limiting?
The board is a package with shoes and bindings for around £250/€300/$350 so I think pretty fair.
I don’t intend on using the board for any parks or jumps but nice cruising down slaloms and something that doesn’t catch an edge too easily when learning.
There’s a couple of schools of thought here.

one is to grab a board like this, agree easy to learn, less likely to catch an edge and build some confidence and get comfortable on the slopes. The issue here is that if you do pick it up quickly, a board like this may limit your progression and you’ll need to buy another board anyway soon after to take that next step. And when you do get another board, likely with some camber in it and a bit stiffer, you’ll catch an edge anyway and again go through that learning process of a new board.
Another train of thought is to grab a board with some camber hybrid profile and not too aggressive and learn on that. They can still be fore-giving and more likely to see you through a few seasons as you get confidence, more speed, learn carving techniques, jumps, side hits etc and work out what type of riding you want to concentrate on in the future and buy a board specifically for that.

Disclaimer, I’ve got no idea in terms of instructing snowboarding 🏂 and there’s plenty more experienced in here who will give you some advice but for me, there’s nothing wrong with learning to catch an edge early and improving that technique from day 1.
 

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Looks like it’s from the mid to early ‘00s with the 3D mounting pattern. While the board is fine, it is old as are the bindings. I don’t know if they’re worth the better part of 250. As for the boots unless they fit you snowboard correctly they’re worthless. I would aim to buy gear from the last 5-7 years if budget is a concern
 

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Cheers for the heads up, very helpful! In which way would you say it will be limiting?
The board is a package with shoes and bindings for around £250/€300/$350 so I think pretty fair.
I don’t intend on using the board for any parks or jumps but nice cruising down slaloms and something that doesn’t catch an edge too easily when learning.
You in the UK Mikey? Have a look at Absolute Snow - you can buy a brand new set up for around £300. It'll be a lot better than what you're looking at there and most importantly the boots will be the right size. Don't just buy the same size as your street shoes. Check out the boot fitting threads and measure your feet.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There’s a couple of schools of thought here.

one is to grab a board like this, agree easy to learn, less likely to catch an edge and build some confidence and get comfortable on the slopes. The issue here is that if you do pick it up quickly, a board like this may limit your progression and you’ll need to buy another board anyway soon after to take that next step. And when you do get another board, likely with some camber in it and a bit stiffer, you’ll catch an edge anyway and again go through that learning process of a new board.
Another train of thought is to grab a board with some camber hybrid profile and not too aggressive and learn on that. They can still be fore-giving and more likely to see you through a few seasons as you get confidence, more speed, learn carving techniques, jumps, side hits etc and work out what type of riding you want to concentrate on in the future and buy a board specifically for that.

Disclaimer, I’ve got no idea in terms of instructing snowboarding 🏂 and there’s plenty more experienced in here who will give you some advice but for me, there’s nothing wrong with learning to catch an edge early and improving that technique from day 1.
Thank you for the help! Some good points to take from that.
 

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You in the UK Mikey? Have a look at Absolute Snow - you can buy a brand new set up for around £300. It'll be a lot better than what you're looking at there and most importantly the boots will be the right size. Don't just buy the same size as your street shoes. Check out the boot fitting threads and measure your feet.
You in the UK Mikey? Have a look at Absolute Snow - you can buy a brand new set up for around £300. It'll be a lot better than what you're looking at there and most importantly the boots will be the right size. Don't just buy the same size as your street shoes. Check out the boot fitting threads and measure your feet.
I have family there but currently live in Norway. But that website looks great, thank you! I shall look into the different boards and set-ups they have to build a brand new set and see what the overall costs of shipping it over will be like as we have pretty nasty Customs and Tax costs on received parcels here 😞 Definitely a good point on the boots situation though, thank you!
 

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I have family there but currently live in Norway. But that website looks great, thank you! I shall look into the different boards and set-ups they have to build a brand new set and see what the overall costs of shipping it over will be like as we have pretty nasty Customs and Tax costs on received parcels here Definitely a good point on the boots situation though, thank you!
Try Blue Tomato in Germany as well, I didn't check for you but they usually have good deals.
 

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There are some good deals in Europe. You can also check the Burton website directly because sometimes they have better deals than distributors.
If you are into an entry level board a Descendant might work for you. You can get a new one (model 2020) for eur 240. link Probably you can find deals for bindings and boots as well.
 

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one is to grab a board like this, agree easy to learn, less likely to catch an edge and build some confidence and get comfortable on the slopes. The issue here is that if you do pick it up quickly, a board like this may limit your progression and you’ll need to buy another board anyway soon after to take that next step. And when you do get another board, likely with some camber in it and a bit stiffer, you’ll catch an edge anyway and again go through that learning process of a new board.
Another train of thought is to grab a board with some camber hybrid profile and not too aggressive and learn on that. They can still be fore-giving and more likely to see you through a few seasons as you get confidence, more speed, learn carving techniques, jumps, side hits etc and work out what type of riding you want to concentrate on in the future and buy a board specifically for that.
Spot on in my opinion. This is really the choice you have to make. If it were me I would go with the latter. Usually I would tell younger kids to start off with rocker because they tend to be less patient and its more forgiving. If you've been a few times and feel like you are committed to it, I would go with the hybrid camber or even full camber on a less aggressive, flexible board. Will be a little tougher to learn on, but you will appreciate it later.
 
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