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I have been riding Ride SPIs for the last few years - never tried rear entry bindings - like my bindings reasonably tight and responsive for fear of getting a little lazy and catching an edge. I would really like to move to a rear entry binding for the convenience when I board with friends that ski. My take right now from all I've read is that Flows is a love/hate.. I am considering trying the NXT ATs if anything in the Flow line up but I feel like I may not like a fit that doesn't feel snug in the binding. Looking at the K2 CTX, i don't like all the moving parts mostly - and the weight is definitely more than what I'm used to with the SPIs on my Gnu Carbon Credit board. The Gnus look like maybe the best of both worlds, although my two concerns are 1) lack the ability to ratchet down once in if the fit is not tuned in perfectly from the beginning 2) ability to adjust the high back.

I can't find much of anything on the 2011 Gnus and whether there is any improvement or what people think. Is there a reason why there is little or no buzz on these bindings?
 

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I am considering trying the NXT ATs if anything in the Flow line up but I feel like I may not like a fit that doesn't feel snug in the binding.
I would suggest clamping into a pair. You can crank the AT's in so that your you have an ultra snug fit. Rear entry may be the draw, but it is the support and the performance factors that have grown Flow to becom the 2nd largest binding company. The ratchets are not a minor factor and in 2011, I would not consider a binding without them. They not only offer traditional ratchet only entry, but they are also critical for easy on slope adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am considering trying the NXT ATs if anything in the Flow line up but I feel like I may not like a fit that doesn't feel snug in the binding.
I would suggest clamping into a pair. You can crank the AT's in so that your you have an ultra snug fit. Rear entry may be the draw, but it is the support and the performance factors that have grown Flow to becom the 2nd largest binding company. The ratchets are not a minor factor and in 2011, I would not consider a binding without them. They not only offer traditional ratchet only entry, but they are also critical for easy on slope adjustment.
Thanks everyone for your input. I think you're right and I need to try the Flows and see how they feel. I found a local store that is going to order a pair of NXT ATs and let me mount them on my board and try them out, in the store anyway.
 

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Gnus are made by Sp Fastec, you can find all the info on them here and their latest models, Videos are here. I have the new 2011 Brotherhood and dam they are great, the extra ratchet alows for those tweaks when you need them.

Having said that I also use K2 CTX, Not sure why everyone says too many moving parts. I have not had an issue and yes they move when you put them on and they move when you take them off, but after that they are totally secure, more so than the Fastecs, As for weight, sorry I am not doing 360's and so forth but I have never felt the weight and it has never stopped me carving hard and fast amongst the trees.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Gnus are made by Sp Fastec, you can find all the info on them here and their latest models, Videos are here. I have the new 2011 Brotherhood and dam they are great, the extra ratchet alows for those tweaks when you need them.

Having said that I also use K2 CTX, Not sure why everyone says too many moving parts. I have not had an issue and yes they move when you put them on and they move when you take them off, but after that they are totally secure, more so than the Fastecs, As for weight, sorry I am not doing 360's and so forth but I have never felt the weight and it has never stopped me carving hard and fast amongst the trees.
I had a long conversation with a guy at Berg's ski/snowboard shop last night who tries out all the gear. He has tried them all out and I mentioned the weight of the ctx's compared to the gnus. He had a digital scale and the ctxs are .2 oz more than the gnus - pretty much the same. He also likes the ctx feel a bit more than the gnus, if you like feeling tight in the binding. He had me leaning back towards the ctx binding for the cantilevered bed, i have a short instep so consider my stance pretty wide.
 

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I am considering trying the NXT ATs if anything in the Flow line up but I feel like I may not like a fit that doesn't feel snug in the binding.
I would suggest clamping into a pair. You can crank the AT's in so that your you have an ultra snug fit. Rear entry may be the draw, but it is the support and the performance factors that have grown Flow to becom the 2nd largest binding company. The ratchets are not a minor factor and in 2011, I would not consider a binding without them. They not only offer traditional ratchet only entry, but they are also critical for easy on slope adjustment.
:thumbsup:

...I would not be worried about not feeling snug in some flows. especially if you get the NXT's cause they are highly adjustable. It took me a while to get them the way I wanted them, but now I think ill never ride any other kind of bindings again. I love the consistency of the rear entry too...no more guessing on ratchets and having your support feel different on every run

oh yea and based on my experience, during a sesh at the mountain with your buddies you'll end up getting 1 or 2 more runs than they do just because of the speed of the rear entry...I normally dont even have to stop after getting off the lift :)
 

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I had a long conversation with a guy at Berg's ski/snowboard shop last night who tries out all the gear. He has tried them all out and I mentioned the weight of the ctx's compared to the gnus. He had a digital scale and the ctxs are .2 oz more than the gnus - pretty much the same. He also likes the ctx feel a bit more than the gnus, if you like feeling tight in the binding. He had me leaning back towards the ctx binding for the cantilevered bed, i have a short instep so consider my stance pretty wide.


Don't you just love true facts over internet dribble that is handed down as facts. That will go a long way to explain why I don't feel any difference in the weigth of these bindings.. Because there isn't any. :thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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interesting opinion

The Angry Snowboarder Blog Archive Taking It In The Rear

Saw this in the comments after the article. This guy seemed to have a pretty thorough take (there are some other interesting comments too):

I saw a guy who couldn’t get into his 2 strap binding cause he couldn’t get all the snow out. I think a binding is a 3 step thing, is it comfortable, how it rides & convience, the last part depends on the user. Same deal with boots.

Cinch, I didn’t like how the binding rode(too soft of a hiback), heavier than hell, was comfortable, but convience was lacking since the straps would ratchet down or move before you got in. I still have never seen somebody use a cinch by lowering the hiback.

The fastec binding, what GNU & 16 other companies use has come a long ways as far as look, I only rode a the cheapest version from a couple of years ago. You had to take apart the whole binding just to adjust it, including forward lean, binding was painful, rode like shit & you still have to adjust the cap strap to get in & click the ankle lever down. So, I would just buy a 2 strap since i have to do the same stuff anyways.

Flow, which I have, I like, but I’m use to them. My first time took me a couple of runs to get use to since I tried to crank them down like a 2 strap….which you don’t do & I like that it’s just one step, usually I just kick my foot in just after getting off the lift. My super old ones, I didn’t like the hiback, but now they have hibacks that are way more comfy & either stiffer or torsionally softer. This is the only binding that actually rides different, the others ride like 2 straps. Maybe it’s me, but I feel more in control in rough terrain.

Apo, has been around for 7 years I think, it rode ok, still had to adjust the cap strap everytime I got in, but the rest worked fine. Problem is I don’t know where you can get them in the states & am not a big fan of hinges.

Pretty much all these bindings have ratchets or something that you can just lift up to get in normally or to clear snow out or if your on a steep slope
 

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Fastec Brotherhoods and Troopas are totally tool-less adjustment, I can't comment on the other moels. Forward lean is a twist of a knurled roller with fingers, no need to even remove boot from binding to adjust, just lower the high back and adjust then raise it up.

The toe strap is adjusted at set up and thats it. If you adjust it afterwards there is a good chance you will force the boot too far rearwards in the binding and not be able to lower the high back properly. Been there myself.

The toe strap/cap in reality is irrelevant. Heel side turns involve the heel pushing, not the toe lifting. Toe side is the same. The toe cap does not have to exert lots of tension to work. In the Fastec set up the toe cap is pushed firmly onto the boot and locked. The highback is lowered and the boot removed, the toe strap is then taken in one notch each side. It is then deemed to be correct tension for when you put the boot back in. The ankle strap can be tightened and the high back can be adjusted as much as you like, just don't go messing with the toe cap, it doesn't need it.

As for snow/ice getting in the binding and stopping you getting your foot in, that applies to any binding. I can't see the difference between a traditional two strap binding and the Fastec, they both have the same straps but the Fastec also lowers the highback.

For me the step ins are for convenience, I am 6ft 5in and 45yrs my feet are a long way down there, the less time I spend bent down or sitting on the snow the better for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Fastec Brotherhoods and Troopas are totally tool-less adjustment, I can't comment on the other moels. Forward lean is a twist of a knurled roller with fingers, no need to even remove boot from binding to adjust, just lower the high back and adjust then raise it up.

The toe strap is adjusted at set up and thats it. If you adjust it afterwards there is a good chance you will force the boot too far rearwards in the binding and not be able to lower the high back properly. Been there myself.

The toe strap/cap in reality is irrelevant. Heel side turns involve the heel pushing, not the toe lifting. Toe side is the same. The toe cap does not have to exert lots of tension to work. In the Fastec set up the toe cap is pushed firmly onto the boot and locked. The highback is lowered and the boot removed, the toe strap is then taken in one notch each side. It is then deemed to be correct tension for when you put the boot back in. The ankle strap can be tightened and the high back can be adjusted as much as you like, just don't go messing with the toe cap, it doesn't need it.

As for snow/ice getting in the binding and stopping you getting your foot in, that applies to any binding. I can't see the difference between a traditional two strap binding and the Fastec, they both have the same straps but the Fastec also lowers the highback.

For me the step ins are for convenience, I am 6ft 5in and 45yrs my feet are a long way down there, the less time I spend bent down or sitting on the snow the better for me.
So Cavman, you ride both CTX and Fastecs - which do you like better? I am an all mountain kinda rider and mostly stay out of the parks. I am leaning towards the CTXs mostly because they have been around longer and a lot more info about them. I would think that the mechanism would ultimately create problems and loosen up or have other malfunctions as opposed to the Fastecs but I haven't heard much of any on the user forums - and since they are way more available at local stores, probably easier to get parts. They also look a little easier to get into if the snow is deeper and not groomed.
 

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So Cavman, you ride both CTX and Fastecs - which do you like better? I am an all mountain kinda rider and mostly stay out of the parks. I am leaning towards the CTXs mostly because they have been around longer and a lot more info about them. I would think that the mechanism would ultimately create problems and loosen up or have other malfunctions as opposed to the Fastecs but I haven't heard much of any on the user forums - and since they are way more available at local stores, probably easier to get parts. They also look a little easier to get into if the snow is deeper and not groomed.
Flow has been around the longest :)

And if you get 2009 model or higher, powder won't be a problem. You can just undo the outer straps and strap in like normal. The SE versions make that even easier.
 

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agreed :thumbsup:
...and the 2011 ratchets have been upgraded and upsized all the way down the line. Full dual entry and micro tuning performance has seen a huge upgrade in 2011. :cheeky4::cheeky4::cheeky4:
 

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With the advice of some of the guys on here, like Leo, I went with the Flow NXT-AT and I'm pretty excited about them. I like the way they look and I feel the larger surface area will allow me to tighten the binding without having pressure points on my feet. I was curious and I found a great deal at my local sports chalet (50% of on 2010 models), so my risk is minimal. Plus, I just felt the length of time that Flow has been in the rear entry binding market should give them an advantage in making a better product.

here's my binding n board I just got.....

 

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All I have to say about the Cinch's is that K2 also makes the Auto line which outsells the Cinch significantly... The weight issue has probably been somewhat reconciled over the last couple of years but the design is still the same and at least to me has never really been that good. I like their concept and the same goes with Fastec's which I was also looking into but at the end of the day if I'm going to go step-in it's going to be Flow. I had a pair of Amp's a few years back and I couldn't stand them because they were so bulky and unresponsive. They also had cable issues and were completely unreliable. That said they were also really comfortable and easy to get in/out of in average conditions. I have stayed away because of the durability and weight issues with them but the last 2-3 seasons they have really improved. I'm either going K2 Auto or NXT for this season.
 

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So Cavman, you ride both CTX and Fastecs - which do you like better? I am an all mountain kinda rider and mostly stay out of the parks. I am leaning towards the CTXs mostly because they have been around longer and a lot more info about them. I would think that the mechanism would ultimately create problems and loosen up or have other malfunctions as opposed to the Fastecs but I haven't heard much of any on the user forums - and since they are way more available at local stores, probably easier to get parts. They also look a little easier to get into if the snow is deeper and not groomed.
K2 high back folds down to about 45 degrees and feel like you are sliding your foot into a shoe, in and down. The Fastecs fold all the way flat like the Flows, so more like sliding your foot into a slipper.

The advantage of the K2/Fastec over the Flows is two fold. The Flow has the big one piece strap, yes it does provide full boot pressure I agree, the downside is that snow and ice can build up in there if you are not careful.

Secondly Flows do not exstend or release the ankle strap when the highback goes back, so you have to force your foot firmly in and the strap is already gripping your foot bridge even before you raise the highback. This is where I had my issues with Flow and snow/ice build up.

When I saw the K2 canterlever system that raised the ankle strap at the same time as you lowered the highback it simply meant putting you foot in, there was no grip or resistance against your boot on the straps. Once the highback was raised then the ankle strap bit down and secured me in. Big difference for me.

Fastec offered the same comcept, that being no pressure/resistance to putting the boot in at all. The fastec also has the small buckle to make adjustments on the ankle strap as required.

To get out of the Fastecs in deep snow simple undo the ankle strap and then the buckle. The K2s you can undo both straps as they are exactly the same as a normal two strap binding.

As for the mechinism wearing out? I have not heard of anyone saying they used one and it "wore out" or "its all loosens up"

For all mountain riding I prefer the K2 CTX, but having said that, my Fastect models I have are for my other boards which are smaller and more for small kickers and butters etc. I was thinking of putting my Troopas on my Ride Highlife 168cm Wide after I get back from Japan and see how it goes on my local mountain.

At the end of the day, these bindings suit me and my riding style. It is all about preference.
 

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K2 high back folds down to about 45 degrees and feel like you are sliding your foot into a shoe, in and down. The Fastecs fold all the way flat like the Flows, so more like sliding your foot into a slipper.

The advantage of the K2/Fastec over the Flows is two fold. The Flow has the big one piece strap, yes it does provide full boot pressure I agree, the downside is that snow and ice can build up in there if you are not careful.

Secondly Flows do not exstend or release the ankle strap when the highback goes back, so you have to force your foot firmly in and the strap is already gripping your foot bridge even before you raise the highback. This is where I had my issues with Flow and snow/ice build up.

When I saw the K2 canterlever system that raised the ankle strap at the same time as you lowered the highback it simply meant putting you foot in, there was no grip or resistance against your boot on the straps. Once the highback was raised then the ankle strap bit down and secured me in. Big difference for me.

Fastec offered the same comcept, that being no pressure/resistance to putting the boot in at all. The fastec also has the small buckle to make adjustments on the ankle strap as required.

To get out of the Fastecs in deep snow simple undo the ankle strap and then the buckle. The K2s you can undo both straps as they are exactly the same as a normal two strap binding.

As for the mechinism wearing out? I have not heard of anyone saying they used one and it "wore out" or "its all loosens up"

For all mountain riding I prefer the K2 CTX, but having said that, my Fastect models I have are for my other boards which are smaller and more for small kickers and butters etc. I was thinking of putting my Troopas on my Ride Highlife 168cm Wide after I get back from Japan and see how it goes on my local mountain.

At the end of the day, these bindings suit me and my riding style. It is all about preference.
Hi Cavman,

A few things. It is hard to compare "Flow bindings" as a group to any other make or model because there are 18 very different model in the current line. Unlike the companies that are very new to producing rear entry bindings, Flow has been at it for a decade and a half.

The "big one piece strap" you mentioned seems as though you are comparing to older models. Many of the current Flow models have less strap surface area than similar conventional bindings.



The extending ankle strap that you are considering a positive on the extendable models from the non-Flow manufacturers is actually a negative that had to be worked with to avoid Flow's existing technology. One of the strongest features of the Flow system is the incredibly snug fit that is achieved when the highback is raised against the static strap system. This is lost when the straps must extend.

Getting this set up takes some understanding of the system and as riders above have attested, it becomes so easy that no stops are needed. If you are applying force to enter a current Flow model, there is either a usage issue or a sizing issue.

We can troubleshoot either.
 

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Wiredsport

I will agree that the model I used was the older one. I was not saying that Flow was not good. I was simply stating that with a flow your foot is pressed against the strap as you go in, It has to. You can say that it is all loose and free when you slide you boot in, but when you raise the highback suddenly the pressure across the top of the boot is totally firm and secure.

I found that there were times I had to stab my foot into the binding and other times I had to wriggle it to get it out.

I like my bindings firm on my boots and that is why I liked the other models over the flow, the fact that I could put my boot in similar to how a person boots their boot into a standard two strap binding. No pressure, no friction. Then raise the higback, fold the strap and click it is super tight across the ankle.

I don't see how having an ankle strap that loosens or widens to put your boot in and then locks down to secure your boot is a negative.

I know Flow have been around a long time and their models have changed. Lots of people like Flows, lots don't. If there were no Fastecs or K2 CTXs for me to use I would be using a Flow binding, have no doubt.
 
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