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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys,

Just before i start the post, I'd like to point out...FIRST POST!

*cough* Anyway,

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I'm thinking of buying a Kessler board since I've heard of it's reputation and I am quite serious about snowboarding.

I read The Ride review and was wondering if anyone knows the difference between each of the three main Kessler snowboards and more importantly: If anyone has experienced any of them? 'm not sure which one to get, I'm leaning towards The Cross but Kessler being Kessler, it's not exactly cheap and I don't want to buy it until I'm sure what the differences are etc...etc...

I've googled Kessler and found the website but it isn't brilliantly clear and there are hardly any videos on youtube on Kessler and very limited information on google (surprisingly).

Many thanks 8)

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Edit: Additional information:

Here are the "noob essentials" about me, but this question is more general. But whatever :p

Weight: 70kg/154lbs
Boot size: 10.5
Riding style (do you like to charge steeps? Spin 7's/9's, ride groomers?): I like sticking on the piste and racing down the mountain in record speeds and doing the occasional trick or two.
Age (are you still growing and puttin on weight?): 20, weight is fairly constant.
Budget (if you have one): I'm about to be ripped off by Kessler, so... don't worry about the budget. (haha)
Your location of riding: The Alps, France. Specifically Tignes/Val D'Isere in December 2015.
 

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The Swiss Miss
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:welcome:

I don’t know the boards, can't help to compare... I also don't think you will find many guys here who would know them... you may have more luck at bomberonline.com
Also.. visit the Kessler homepage every now and then for updates on events; they usually have many demo days in A and CH which may be a destination for a trip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:welcome:

I don’t know the boards, can't help to compare... I also don't think you will find many guys here who would know them... you may have more luck at bomberonline.com
Also.. visit the Kessler homepage every now and then for updates on events; they usually have many demo days in A and CH which may be a destination for a trip.
Thank you for your reply and advice :)

That sounds good actually, i'll definitely watch out for that - thanks!!
 

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Do you ride alpine hardboots? That is where Kessler excels and is why she referred you to bomber. Their bread and butter is from alpine race boards.
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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I have been on the Ride, and another forum member owns one. What is your experience level? (be honest here) They're all a lot of board unless you're looking for a VERY aggressive carving machine.

The Alpine and Cross are race boards, do not buy them.

The ride is much stiffer, and much more heavily cambered than pretty much anything out there marketed as a "freeride" board.

I found the ride had very good edgehold in choppy groomed snow. But I found my board (Virus Avalanche FLP AFT) had overall better edgehold in all conditions. The Kessler would probably be what I'd choose if I was racing a banked slalom course, but I wouldn't buy it otherwise.

Where do you normally ride? What snow conditions? What do you ultimately want out of a board?

I don't want to deter you from buying a good board, I'm just skeptical the Kessler is right for your needs. I think it's a VERY niche board, and I ride a niche board myself...

edit: Sorry just read the end of your post. If you're looking to do some softboot carving, the Ride is certainly an option, but I'd also look at the Volkl Coal XT, Virus Avalanche FLP AFT or UFC, Donek Flux, or the Oxess freeride boards.

Here's what the Volkl Coal can do in the right hands:

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Do you ride alpine hardboots? That is where Kessler excels and is why she referred you to bomber. Their bread and butter is from alpine race boards.
No, Yeah I guess that's true.



I have been on the Ride, and another forum member owns one. What is your experience level? (be honest here) They're all a lot of board unless you're looking for a VERY aggressive carving machine.

The Alpine and Cross are race boards, do not buy them.

The ride is much stiffer, and much more heavily cambered than pretty much anything out there marketed as a "freeride" board.

I found the ride had very good edgehold in choppy groomed snow. But I found my board (Virus Avalanche FLP AFT) had overall better edgehold in all conditions. The Kessler would probably be what I'd choose if I was racing a banked slalom course, but I wouldn't buy it otherwise.

Where do you normally ride? What snow conditions? What do you ultimately want out of a board?

I don't want to deter you from buying a good board, I'm just skeptical the Kessler is right for your needs. I think it's a VERY niche board, and I ride a niche board myself...

edit: Sorry just read the end of your post. If you're looking to do some softboot carving, the Ride is certainly an option, but I'd also look at the Volkl Coal XT, Virus Avalanche FLP AFT or UFC, Donek Flux, or the Oxess freeride boards.

Here's what the Volkl Coal can do in the right hands:

My experience level is one year. I've been snowboarding a total of three weeks. Once in December for a week and once in March/April for a week.

I'm at the dry slope most days and can't stop snowboarding; best thing ever!

I normally ride in The Alps in France. I was in Les Arc (with seriously dreadful snowfall that season, worst snow since 1969 apparenly...) in December and Val Thorens in March.

Snow conditions varied in December. 1800 was icey as hell and snow wasn't great. 2000m+ was decent snow, plenty of powder.

March it was the typical slushy feeling as season starts to end and excellent snow in Val Thorens.

I'm going to Tignes/Val D'isere in December, and I want to seriously go HAM on the snow, race down the mountain in record speed. The faster I go, the happier I am....until I knock myself out (and possibly die?) when I catch an edge (Y)

No but seriously, I'm a speed freak.

So speed is pretty good on my priority list when looking at boards. If the design looks good, that's a plus but it's not an absolute necessary thing to have. But having a sweet design (as you guys know) is brownie points on the mountain :)

Oh and thank you very much for commenting, you're really helping me decide on what board to buy; so I am really grateful for your help and advice. :)

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Edit: I am currently riding the Endeavour BOD board. Link here
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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Okay so right now you're riding a rocker, twin board. In other words a very freestyle oriented board...

The Kessler Ride is a very extreme opposite from that! I honestly don't think you'd enjoy it.

You should try a more camber oriented, directional board.

If it were my money, I'd buy something like a Burton Custom X, Prior Mens Freeride, Jones Flagship, etc. and spend the money you've saved on some private lessons. Going fast gets boring quick, carving HARD, and carving WELL are where the real thrills come from if you're planning on staying on-piste.

Have fun!
 

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The Swiss Miss
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3 weeks of snowboarding... that means you're a beginner overestimating your abilities or a heavenly gifted natural talen. (Likelyhood for the first is higher ;)).

Do us and yourself a favour and slow down and work on carving technique and only begin to look into speed when you have enough edge control to react, go around, brake if someone gets in your way if you're riding at high speed - whatever number you consider as "speed". After three weeks, you just don’t have that yet :dunno:
 
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Scorching the Slopes
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3 weeks of snowboarding... that means you're a beginner overestimating your abilities or a heavenly gifted natural talen. (Likelyhood for the first is higher ;)).

Do us and yourself a favour and slow down and work on carving technique and only begin to look into speed when you have enough edge control to react, go around, brake if someone gets in your way if you're riding at high speed - whatever number you consider as "speed". After three weeks, you just don’t have that yet :dunno:
Thank you neni.
Couldn't have said it better myself.

Of course, now we have to make sure the OP understands what is actually "carving". Hint: it's not simply linking turns.:dry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
3 weeks of snowboarding... that means you're a beginner overestimating your abilities or a heavenly gifted natural talen. (Likelyhood for the first is higher ;)).

Do us and yourself a favour and slow down and work on carving technique and only begin to look into speed when you have enough edge control to react, go around, brake if someone gets in your way if you're riding at high speed - whatever number you consider as "speed". After three weeks, you just don’t have that yet :dunno:
I guess you're right... =/

But what distinguishes beginner/intermediate/expert riders? (In your opinion)
 

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Scorching the Slopes
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Don't lose your enthusiasm for snowboarding!

Just (dare I say it?) slow down a bit and make sure you are in FULL control of your board. Generally, beginners do not have this ability, even on easier slopes.
Get technique mastered, then add speed.
 

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But what distinguishes beginner/intermediate/expert riders? (In your opinion)
This is how Fernie's snow school breaks it down:

"Adult Snowboard Ability Levels
Group 1 This is your first time snowboarding.
Group 2 You ride cautiously and find green runs a challenge
Group 3 You ride green runs comfortably but would like more confidence.
Group 4 You ride blue runs. You would like to learn some basic tricks and learn to ride switch.
Group 5 You ride blue and black runs with confidence. You would like to go to the rail park and ride the steeps. "

The first 3-4 groups would all be beginner in my books.

Intermediate starts when you can start to carve on easy runs (big difference between carving and slider turns)

Advanced is when you're comfortable riding any terrain at any hill, and can carve well on almost any pitch, in almost any snow condition.

Expert is when you can do the advanced stuff but make it look effortless. An advanced snowboarder will ride black diamond moguls, an expert rider will do it with a very quiet upper body.

This video is actually a good demonstration of the difference between intermediate/advanced slider turns, and carving...


Snowboarding is 90% rider, 10% gear. Invest in a good instructor and your riding will thank you! :hairy:
 

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The Swiss Miss
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I guess you're right... =/

But what distinguishes beginner/intermediate/expert riders? (In your opinion)
Hmmm... good question :).
My ad hoc answer would go more in the direction of how much effort/concentration someone needs to ride rather than how many tricks he can perform or how fast he can go... a beginner is still very concentraded on himself, needs all his concentration to conciously process the right movements. He may be able to do some proper turns but they don't come naturally yet, he's very absorbed; bumps throw him off balance, icy patches make him insecurely scratching on heel edge, flats or cat tracks are obstacles.

An intermediate can already use part of his attention for his surrounding. He has a certain balance, muscle memory, experience to react automatically to new conditions but still needs big part of his concentration to monitor his edges/check snow surface/use proper technique. He may feel fine on his setup but insecure on a new profile/length/...

An advanced has built up enough muscle memory by riding so many hours in many different situations that he doesn't have to conciously think about riding anymore. Has total edge control, mini adjustments with big effect. New situations won't throw him off, legs know what to do. He has complete independent upper/lower body coordination and can use all his attention to his surrounding - which you should have if you ride fast, cos things happen quickly ;). He's fine on many different types of boards, the perfect setup is a matter of optimization rather than enabling, however, he still profits from the optimal board. He gets down everywhere but may not look very elegant at times.

An expert does it all, with Sorels fixed with duct tape on a 2x4, with ease. He doesn't care about the setup, will carve n bomb with a noodle freestyle board as easily as with a designated freeride plank. He's home on anything in any condition in any situation any speed any pitch any obstacle - he can negociate everything with ease, seemingly effortless.

BTW: eh... didn't want to come across rude... it's just better/healthier for you to concentrate more on proper technique than just point it. To bomb can be fun, yes, but it's way more fun if you can mix high speed carves into it, chase friends, ride through a mogul field quickly, tackle jumps (thats something I am working at... :rolleyes:) than just unidimensionally let the board follow the fall line and be in constant danger to hurt yourself :).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Don't lose your enthusiasm for snowboarding!

Just (dare I say it?) slow down a bit and make sure you are in FULL control of your board. Generally, beginners do not have this ability, even on easier slopes.
Get technique mastered, then add speed.
Oh I won't ;P

This is how Fernie's snow school breaks it down:

"Adult Snowboard Ability Levels
Group 1 This is your first time snowboarding.
Group 2 You ride cautiously and find green runs a challenge
Group 3 You ride green runs comfortably but would like more confidence.
Group 4 You ride blue runs. You would like to learn some basic tricks and learn to ride switch.
Group 5 You ride blue and black runs with confidence. You would like to go to the rail park and ride the steeps. "

The first 3-4 groups would all be beginner in my books.

Intermediate starts when you can start to carve on easy runs (big difference between carving and slider turns)

Advanced is when you're comfortable riding any terrain at any hill, and can carve well on almost any pitch, in almost any snow condition.

Expert is when you can do the advanced stuff but make it look effortless. An advanced snowboarder will ride black diamond moguls, an expert rider will do it with a very quiet upper body.

This video is actually a good demonstration of the difference between intermediate/advanced slider turns, and carving...


Snowboarding is 90% rider, 10% gear. Invest in a good instructor and your riding will thank you! :hairy:
That's awesome, thanks :) I am (from your criteria) intermediate-ish.

Hmmm... good question :).
My ad hoc answer would go more in the direction of how much effort/concentration someone needs to ride rather than how many tricks he can perform or how fast he can go... a beginner is still very concentraded on himself, needs all his concentration to conciously process the right movements. He may be able to do some proper turns but they don't come naturally yet, he's very absorbed; bumps throw him off balance, icy patches make him insecurely scratching on heel edge, flats or cat tracks are obstacles.

An intermediate can already use part of his attention for his surrounding. He has a certain balance, muscle memory, experience to react automatically to new conditions but still needs big part of his concentration to monitor his edges/check snow surface/use proper technique. He may feel fine on his setup but insecure on a new profile/length/...

An advanced has built up enough muscle memory by riding so many hours in many different situations that he doesn't have to conciously think about riding anymore. Has total edge control, mini adjustments with big effect. New situations won't throw him off, legs know what to do. He has complete independent upper/lower body coordination and can use all his attention to his surrounding - which you should have if you ride fast, cos things happen quickly ;). He's fine on many different types of boards, the perfect setup is a matter of optimization rather than enabling, however, he still profits from the optimal board. He gets down everywhere but may not look very elegant at times.

An expert does it all, with Sorels fixed with duct tape on a 4x4, with ease. He doesn't care about the setup, will carve n bomb with a noodle freestyle board as easily as with a designated freeride plank. He's home on anything in any condition in any situation any speed any pitch any obstacle - he can negociate everything with ease, seemingly effortless.

BTW: eh... didn't want to come across rude... it's just better/healthier for you to concentrate more on proper technique than just point it. To bomb can be fun, yes, but it's way more fun if you can mix high speed carves into it, chase friends, ride through a mogul field quickly, tackle jumps (thats something I am working at... :rolleyes:) than just unidimensionally let the board follow the fall line and be in constant danger to hurt yourself :).
Awesome, thanks for making it a lot more clearer in my mind. Oh no worries, I prefer blunt and to the point as opposed to bundling facts with sugar. So thanks again!
 

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The Swiss Miss
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very well said. It never gets old, IMO. the g-forces, violent vibrations, all of it.
And the tired legs at the end of the day. Love the time in the afternoon when a resort gets almost empty and one can ride some last quick rounds and add long drawn out carves usinge the entire slope and completely suck the last energy out of the legs. You guys in CO are lucky with your highway sized groomers :).
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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i'll pretend i didn't see this. it sounds like you just need to go faster
BAH!!! :D

Found another video I was thinking of earlier. It's used at Nakiska to help people pick which group they're in. I'd say 1-3 are beginner, 4-5 is intermediate, 6+ is advanced, and for expert watch races or The Art of Flight. :hairy:

Intermediate is the big meaty stage of snowboarding. Most snowboarders I think never get past this. You can't buy your way past it either. The only way to progress is time, effort, and good coaching/instructing.

 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
BAH!!! :D

Found another video I was thinking of earlier. It's used at Nakiska to help people pick which group they're in. I'd say 1-3 are beginner, 4-5 is intermediate, 6+ is advanced, and for expert watch races or The Art of Flight. :hairy:

Intermediate is the big meaty stage of snowboarding. Most snowboarders I think never get past this. You can't buy your way past it either. The only way to progress is time, effort, and good coaching/instructing.

From that video, I would say I'm a Level 5... >_>
 

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From that video, I would say I'm a Level 5... >_>
so chillax, get a proper camber deck and you will be good for 5+ years of bombing :) I believe even burton custom x would be to much for you :D In my first season I tried to go as fast as possible, but was insecure, so not more 40mph, second winter I was going fast like hell, sometimes 60+, but I couldn't carve, however, was in control most of the time. Third winter I slowed down with speeds, but improved my technique. Ocasionally it's fun to point it down in the morning, but it gets boring to wait for friends :)

Last year was excellent in Les Arcs, we had two waist deep powder days in the end of january.
 
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