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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

Has anyone experience riding a Korua Shapes Pencil Plus?

I came across the board the other day and love its shape and the design.
But before making a purchasing decision I would love to get some opinion from someone who owns or rode it.

I am currently on a Jones Flagship 165w and love it.

The pencil is not designed to replace the flagship but to have a 2nd board.
I am looking for an aggressive and fast board, good for carving but also good for off piste and powder.

I am 189cm and 98Kg - I know that the weight recommendation for the pencil is 95Kg, but Korua wrote me that my weight should not be a problem.

Thanks for any feedback

Cheers

FRED
 

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I haven't ridden the + version, but I've had the regular Pencil 63 for the last two seasons. The board obviously carves well (just watch any of the Korua videos), and is really good in powder. It's very directional, and likes to be driven off the back foot. I haven't ridden a Jones Flagship, but I would think the Pencil will be a very different ride. I actually have a few Koruas, and they are holding up pretty well, but I've heard some people complaining about delams on the tail. I think the + versions are probably a little sturdier.
 

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Carving boards carve. Powder boards powder. No one board does both things very well. You wanna do both things? Do yourself a favor and get two boards. The Korua videos seem to feature bros “carving” in super soft conditions. For real: I like the big turn focused marketing. The shapes are unique. The color scheme and overall styling is very cool. (Do they have to pay Apple licensing for doing the all white thing? Does every Korua come with a pair of earbuds?) I pawed some of their boards in a shop recently and was underwhelmed with the apparent build quality/fit and finish. What factory is making them? Anybody know? Seemed like the boards had lots more style than substance. At least they don’t try to sell boards using some dumb serrated edge “grip” technology.
 

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but I've heard some people complaining about delams on the tail.
You mean you've read about one random guy rage posting about how Korua did not replace his obviously impact-damaged tail chip on his Korua?

I guess now we can all say we've heard about some guy hearing about people complaining about delams on the tail.....
 

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You mean you've read about one random guy rage posting about how Korua did not replace his obviously impact-damaged tail chip on his Korua?

I guess now we can all say we've heard about some guy hearing about people complaining about delams on the tail.....
Actually no, but your right; I shouldn't repeat what I've heard from others. My personal experience with the Koruas that I own is that they ride great (both on groomers and in powder), but are a little more fragile than the other brands I also own (Endeavor and K2). They were also less expensive than my other boards. I have not ridden, but have fondled, a Pencil + and the construction seems sturdier (but is definitely lighter) than my regular model.

Although I have never had a warranty issue, I have had nothing but good experiences dealing with the guys at Korua.
 

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Carving boards carve. Powder boards powder. No one board does both things very well. You wanna do both things? Do yourself a favor and get two boards.
No. Actually a lot of board design aspects that make a board good at carving also make it good in powder and vice versa (already discussed and explained in the other thread). For most people it is entirely possible to have one board that covers both carving and pow.
 

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No. Actually a lot of board design aspects that make a board good at carving also make it good in powder and vice versa (already discussed and explained in the other thread). For most people it is entirely possible to have one board that covers both carving and pow.
I agree that for most people one snowboard can cover both carving and pow. That's because most people don't ride well.

Carving board:
narrower waist and less volume than an all mountain board -you want the opposite of float
long effective edge -longer than an all mountain board
carve shape depends on sidecut radius (or radii)
pure camber
fairly stiff to very stiff flex
must be strong in the nose area
slight binding setback

Powder board:
wide -at minimum it needs a wide nose for float
effective edge is smaller than an all mountain board
larger sidecut radius...the board needs float...powder turns come off of the base, not the metal edges
pure camber is not ideal...better to have some rocker up front...often flat between the bindings
shouldn't be too stiff
large setback often with a chopped tail to reduce fatigue
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well,

I couldn't resist and pulled the trigger - got the pencil plus. First impression: It is insanely light. Although it has a similar size as the flagship, the flagship feels bulky and heavy weight. The top sheet looks beautiful. The camber is more aggressive compared to the flagship. The waist width of both boards is exactly the same with 26,9 cm. The nose of the flagship is of course wider as you can see on the attached photo.

The flex of the board is slightly softer. If the flagship is a 9 I would rank the pencil plus with 8.

I cannot wait to get it on the slopes. Luckily I will be in Laax in nearly 2 weeks.

All, thanks for your comments and feel free to carry on with the discussion - it is an interesting topic.
Once I am back from Laax I will put a review in the board section of the forum.

Cheers

FRED
 

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I agree that for most people one snowboard can cover both carving and pow. That's because most people don't ride well.

Carving board:
narrower waist and less volume than an all mountain board -you want the opposite of float
long effective edge -longer than an all mountain board
carve shape depends on sidecut radius (or radii)
pure camber
fairly stiff to very stiff flex
must be strong in the nose area
slight binding setback

Powder board:
wide -at minimum it needs a wide nose for float
effective edge is smaller than an all mountain board
larger sidecut radius...the board needs float...powder turns come off of the base, not the metal edges
pure camber is not ideal...better to have some rocker up front...often flat between the bindings
shouldn't be too stiff
large setback often with a chopped tail to reduce fatigue
Not gonna get into a debate what it means to 'ride well' enough for you - I'd rather have board designers build boards that fit people and their ability (rather than force people to ride a in certain way to conform with board design).

In any case the above parameters are not contradictory
- Waist width: not super important, a happy medium (maybe slightly wide) will work perfectly fine for both pow and carving
- Effective edge: Yes, long for carving. Does not really matter for pow, so it is not conflicting.
- Sidecut radius: Yes, important for carving. Does not really matter for pow, so it is not conflicting.
- Camber profile: Yes, camber for carving. And camber works perfectly fine for pow boards, especially with some early rise (which is not particularly detrimental).
- Stiffness: Actually not that different
- Setback: By no means need 'large setback' for powder (let alone a chopped tail)

And you forgot taper, which (to an extent) is also beneficial for both carving and powder performance.

See where this is going?
But may be take it from a board designer (whose boards incidentally excel at...wait for it...carving and powder):

That's simply because pow and "carving" boards share a lot of caracteristics needed to perform at both. They both work a whole lot better with taper, setback, and when they don't fold fore of the front binding. That is why the main brands are now marketing their pow boards for both. Strangely, they did not seem to know this before the pow/carve board craze (rolling eyes)... What is now considered a pow board will be outperformed by a carving board when higher speeds and harder conditions will come into play. Longer effective edge, a bit less sidecut, no wavy edges, and stiffer flex will be highly desirable.
http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boards/253650-easy-carving-board-ice-powder-3.html#post3275002
 

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No. Actually a lot of board design aspects that make a board good at carving also make it good in powder and vice versa (already discussed and explained in the other thread). For most people it is entirely possible to have one board that covers both carving and pow.
I agree that for most people one snowboard can cover both carving and pow. That's because most people don't ride well.

Carving board:
narrower waist and less volume than an all mountain board -you want the opposite of float
long effective edge -longer than an all mountain board
carve shape depends on sidecut radius (or radii)
pure camber
fairly stiff to very stiff flex
must be strong in the nose area
slight binding setback

Powder board:
wide -at minimum it needs a wide nose for float
effective edge is smaller than an all mountain board
larger sidecut radius...the board needs float...powder turns come off of the base, not the metal edges
pure camber is not ideal...better to have some rocker up front...often flat between the bindings
shouldn't be too stiff
large setback often with a chopped tail to reduce fatigue
Or maybe you don’t ride well, because many pros don’t use powder specific boards, and have camber between their bindings with sidecuts, and make it look easy. See Iguchi, Mueller, etc.

I’ve read your diatribe on wax, now specific boards for specific applications only. Maybe take the training wheels off and learn to ride yourself...
 

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Do you know what the materials/construction difference is between the Plus and the regular?

(I suppose I could ask them myself, but seems as you've already bought the Plus I figure you might already know)
+ has carbon in the laminate and different core mostly. Also different base and topsheet materials, but that is more marketing/psychlogical.
 

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Or maybe you don’t ride well, because many pros don’t use powder specific boards, and have camber between their bindings with sidecuts, and make it look easy. See Iguchi, Mueller, etc.

I’ve read your diatribe on wax, now specific boards for specific applications only. Maybe take the training wheels off and learn to ride yourself...
There are compromise boards. They exist because conditions often vary through the day and from place to place on the mountain. Back country? Committing to a pow specific shape isn’t usually a good idea. You might need to do some edge work to get to and from the deep.

Awesome riders can ride almost anything in any conditions. Within limits. But having the right board for the job is a big boost.

Yesterday I purposefully rode a pow oriented board in bumpy wet snow. It was exactly the wrong tool for the job. I was riding with some slow people/beginners and just wanted to goof around. It was really hard to carve a turn. The softer flex and bigger nose nose made things tricky. Every lump wanted to send me into the air. I couldn’t angulate the board enough to really carve a good turn through the crud. It was really challenging. I learned something from it.

Don’t hate me because I have a goodbye wax job.
 

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There are compromise boards. They exist because conditions often vary through the day and from place to place on the mountain. Back country? Committing to a pow specific shape isn’t usually a good idea. You might need to do some edge work to get to and from the deep.

Awesome riders can ride almost anything in any conditions. Within limits. But having the right board for the job is a big boost.

Yesterday I purposefully rode a pow oriented board in bumpy wet snow. It was exactly the wrong tool for the job. I was riding with some slow people/beginners and just wanted to goof around. It was really hard to carve a turn. The softer flex and bigger nose nose made things tricky. Every lump wanted to send me into the air. I couldn’t angulate the board enough to really carve a good turn through the crud. It was really challenging. I learned something from it.
May be you really do not need to work on your carving technique, because one of the cult boards in the hardboot extreme carving community is the Burton Fish. Has all the things that you said don't work for carving deck (and that seem to give you trouble): Big, soft-ish nose, short effective edge, tight sidecut radius, chopped of tail etc Yet serious caring guys swear by it.
 

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There are compromise boards. They exist because conditions often vary through the day and from place to place on the mountain. Back country? Committing to a pow specific shape isn’t usually a good idea. You might need to do some edge work to get to and from the deep.

Awesome riders can ride almost anything in any conditions. Within limits. But having the right board for the job is a big boost.

Yesterday I purposefully rode a pow oriented board in bumpy wet snow. It was exactly the wrong tool for the job. I was riding with some slow people/beginners and just wanted to goof around. It was really hard to carve a turn. The softer flex and bigger nose nose made things tricky. Every lump wanted to send me into the air. I couldn’t angulate the board enough to really carve a good turn through the crud. It was really challenging. I learned something from it.

Don’t hate me because I have a goodbye wax job.
Well no shit there are specifics about each specific board that make riding "easier". I own a Capita Spring break. Thing bobs like an apple and I was unable to sink it. Literally tried. That said, I don't need it. I am perfectly fine riding a BSOD in deep snow up to my quad.

As far as backcountry goes, VERY FEW people are riding pow that needs a snorkel. If you are riding in the US this year, outside of blower snow that's piled up, you probably couldn't find it in the backcountry. A trip to Japan? Yeah, sure, pow board would be great for tits deep snow.

But 99% of this board can get away with a Flight Attendant, Arbor Iguchi, Jones Flagship, Capita BSOD, etc without ever needing a pow board, because unless you are consistently up to your waist, a good rider could take a NS Evo out and ride pow just fine.

I am more responding to your comment that most people are bad riders, so 1 board is fine. It's actually the opposite. Most people that need to build out a quiver, need to cheat in powder because they can't get their float attendant to float enough on a 15 inch day, and feel they needed a dedicated pow board.

It's the same thing with park boards. Mark McMorris can hit rails with a stiffer cambered stick. He doesn't need a soft noodle to ride park.

I tried a Spring Break. Love it. Easiest pow rider I've ever ridden. Do I need it? Nope, that's why it's up for sale in the buy / sell section. Unless I'm in 3 plus feet everyday, the return is minimal to just riding my Guch or BSOD. And I feel I am a good enough rider that I don't need it. My back leg isn't burning because I have technique. I think plenty of posters on this board do that too.
 

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The pow carve deck is a think and its good at both but doesnt excel at them. When im hitting groomers I ride a cambered from tip to tail board thats made for it. Fullbag diamond blade. I can ride it in pow and trees but why torture myself

If im in deep powder i ride a powder board with an early rise sholen nose nose, deep setback and a snub or swallow tail. Fullbag lifer. Yeah i can carve it but its not the same thing

When i need to have a single big mountain board that can do steeps with crud conditions, groomers and hold its own in pow i would get a board like whats mentioned... pow carve deck. Stiff, cambered between the feet, early rise nose, tapered and setback 3cm or so.

Not sure why people are bashing the desire for a quiver. Doesnt have to do with ability, more with disposable income...
 

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May be you really do not need to work on your carving technique, because one of the cult boards in the hardboot extreme carving community is the Burton Fish. Has all the things that you said don't work for carving deck (and that seem to give you trouble): Big, soft-ish nose, short effective edge, tight sidecut radius, chopped of tail etc Yet serious caring guys swear by it.
Pow boards usually have the opposite of a tight sidecut. The sides are often close to flat/straight.

I can’t say I’ve heard of any carve bros putting plates on a fish. You mean for carving or for special pow? Most full on carvers I know seem to believe their carve setups suck in pow. Many reach for soft boots after it snows. Or they’ll put plates on a OSin 3800 or similar. Or maybe a 4wd. The problem with hardboots on a board not made for them is the boots overpowering the board. It’s not pleasant.
 

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Well no shit there are specifics about each specific board that make riding "easier". I own a Capita Spring break. Thing bobs like an apple and I was unable to sink it. Literally tried. That said, I don't need it. I am perfectly fine riding a BSOD in deep snow up to my quad.

As far as backcountry goes, VERY FEW people are riding pow that needs a snorkel. If you are riding in the US this year, outside of blower snow that's piled up, you probably couldn't find it in the backcountry. A trip to Japan? Yeah, sure, pow board would be great for tits deep snow.

But 99% of this board can get away with a Flight Attendant, Arbor Iguchi, Jones Flagship, Capita BSOD, etc without ever needing a pow board, because unless you are consistently up to your waist, a good rider could take a NS Evo out and ride pow just fine.

I am more responding to your comment that most people are bad riders, so 1 board is fine. It's actually the opposite. Most people that need to build out a quiver, need to cheat in powder because they can't get their float attendant to float enough on a 15 inch day, and feel they needed a dedicated pow board.

It's the same thing with park boards. Mark McMorris can hit rails with a stiffer cambered stick. He doesn't need a soft noodle to ride park.

I tried a Spring Break. Love it. Easiest pow rider I've ever ridden. Do I need it? Nope, that's why it's up for sale in the buy / sell section. Unless I'm in 3 plus feet everyday, the return is minimal to just riding my Guch or BSOD. And I feel I am a good enough rider that I don't need it. My back leg isn't burning because I have technique. I think plenty of posters on this board do that too.
It not just about making it easier. Would you play 18 holes of golf with one club? Surf Big Waves (like EA Classic or Mavs) on a 6’4” retro fish? Ride an Enduro course on a Harley sportster? Play squash with a tennis racquet? All are possible. But it’s better to use the right tool.
 

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The pow carve deck is a think and its good at both but doesnt excel at them. When im hitting groomers I ride a cambered from tip to tail board thats made for it. Fullbag diamond blade. I can ride it in pow and trees but why torture myself

If im in deep powder i ride a powder board with an early rise sholen nose nose, deep setback and a snub or swallow tail. Fullbag lifer. Yeah i can carve it but its not the same thing

When i need to have a single big mountain board that can do steeps with crud conditions, groomers and hold its own in pow i would get a board like whats mentioned... pow carve deck. Stiff, cambered between the feet, early rise nose, tapered and setback 3cm or so.

Not sure why people are bashing the desire for a quiver. Doesnt have to do with ability, more with disposable income...
I’m not bashing at all. It’s personal choice. I was replying to the comment that most people dont have a quiver because they aren’t good riders.

I have a quiver by the way. 6 boards (3 too many?). But having one doesn’t mean I can or can’t ride.
 
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