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I demo one last weekend in just hard groomer conditions. Board was really damp , held a good edge you could really lay into a turn if you wanted too.
Good snap/pop I would imagine it would float well in pow. Overall it was a good board for the conditions I got to ride it in.


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Not a directional Hot Knife. Softer. I'd say more directional Headspace. The Ejack is the directional Hot Knife. Dynamo is a fantastick one board directional quiver option. It's real good.
 

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Old post I know but now I have all the time in the world to reply.

I bought a Dynamo and rode it for what I didn't realise at the time would be my last day of the season.
Disclaimer: I've been snowboarding kind of a long time and know what I like but this is just my opinion. If you want something more objective and knowledgable then you know that @BurtonAvenger and @Nivek review boards for a living and can make an educated comparison to hundreds of others they have ridden. Not trying to step on their toes here and I'm sure they will have an in-depth review up for next season.

I'm 185cm tall 75kgs and US9.5 I bought the 159 and detuned the (very sharp) edges at the contact points. Rode it with Rome Katanas on a day where it was snowing and the visibility went from bad to worse. There are no trees on the mountain so as soon as you get out of sight of lifts and fences the visibility was zero. White void. I was riding the pistes and hitting pockets of heavy pow at and off the sides. Its got a nice flex, felt very medium to me. The nose is still robust enough to blast through chopped up snow. Kind of felt even like the tail was softer than the nose which made it fun to slash around at low to medium speeds and butter on the cat tracks. Its damp but also snappy. Good pop. I never rode it proper fast due to the visibility but I think it would be OK up to a point. Its never going to be a hardcore freeride weapon with this medium flex and mid-width anyway.

The C3 profile on this is camber to flat between the feet and a little bit of early rise in the nose. Between that and the medium magne-traction the edge grip is nuts. It adds to it being a very confidence inspiring board in general. Stable and damp but still plenty pop and playfulness. For me, coming off a board with no edge-tech, the camber plus magne was a bit too much, it would be better with the very minimal mag like on the Gnu Mullair or even none at all. The snow was a bit heavy and it hooked me into uphill carves a few times, I ate shit more than once on toeside eurocarves that I didn't plan to do. I guess you just get used to it and ride/de-tune accordingly but in general as camber makes a comeback they need to chill with the magne-traction. Don't be so proud about your proprietary tech and make the right choice for the board.

It has a nice textured topsheet which is super grippy for riding drag lifts or doing one foot airs but didn't seem to collect any more snow than a regular one would. Looks cool too. All in all its a sick, smooth, do-everything board. Some boards feel like they are telling you to slow down and others to speed up, this is neither and in a good way. Its just enough of what you need it to be in most situations. I'm going to sell the 159 and get a 156 for more mobility and fun times in the park and on side-hits. Anyone (in Europe) want a basically new 159 for a decent price then message me :)
 

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I agree with everything you said. I rode it at a demo day last season (then bought the 156). The Lib/Gnu rep told me I was the first person to ride it in the two days they had been doing demos that weekend -- I rode it in the afternoon of the second day. It just didn't attract a lot of attention, and at that time Lib didn't have Austen Sweeten promoting it, yet. I actually didn't even pay any attention to it when I was looking over the boards in their demo lineup. It was the rep who suggested it to me when I told him that I had enjoyed riding the Antigravity the previous day.

He said that the Dynamo was his favourite board in the lineup and so he was kind of choked that nobody was interested in it. He added that since it wasn't particularly sought-after I should take it for as long as I liked. I rode it for about an hour and felt the same as you -- solid, do-it-all board with nothing in particular about it that stood out. No learning curve. It just competently does whatever you want to do without any fuss. It's a great all-mountain freestyle/freeride board for the Mervin fan.
 

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I agree with everything you said. I rode it at a demo day last season (then bought the 156). The Lib/Gnu rep told me I was the first person to ride it in the two days they had been doing demos that weekend -- I rode it in the afternoon of the second day. It just didn't attract a lot of attention, and at that time Lib didn't have Austen Sweeten promoting it, yet. I actually didn't even pay any attention to it when I was looking over the boards in their demo lineup. It was the rep who suggested it to me when I told him that I had enjoyed riding the Antigravity the previous day.
Did you notice any difference to the Antigravity? On paper they are the same but the Gnu is cheaper. If they ride the same I would cop the Antigravity instead.
 

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I thought the Antigravity was softer than the Dynamo, but I rode it on the first demo day, and the Dynamo on the second day. I had a chance to hop on a brand new Antigravity later on in the season and it was stiffer than what I remembered...more like the Dynamo; I wonder if the initial Antigravity that I had ridden is what to expect once it gets broken in. If that's the case then expect the Antigravity to feel like its flex is on the soft side of medium once it's broken in.
 

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I thought the Antigravity was softer than the Dynamo, but I rode it on the first demo day, and the Dynamo on the second day. I had a chance to hop on a brand new Antigravity later on in the season and it was stiffer than what I remembered...more like the Dynamo; I wonder if the initial Antigravity that I had ridden is what to expect once it gets broken in. If that's the case then expect the Antigravity to feel like its flex is on the soft side of medium once it's broken in.
Thanks, sounds a bit too soft for me then. I'll stick with the Dynamo.
 

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FWIW I demo'd this board a few weeks ago, only a groomer day so can't speak to its float capability.
5'10", 180, Size 10.5
Demo'd 156

I was mainly interested in the Orca but this was the other board they recommended me trying. One rep swore by the Orca, said he rode it almost exclusively this past year, another said the exact same thing about the Dynamo, basically everything from dropping cliffs to running groomers.

I only made two runs but it was a fairly predictable ride but seemed to require more attentiveness than the Orca, or my TRS for that matter. I assume this is because of the C3 profile, felt more like my old camber boards. Very confident in locking in turns but not as nimble IMO as the Orca and definitely felt stiffer. It also was damp. Its a board I could live with but didn't love it. The Orca put a smile on my face immediately so an easy choice for me. To me it seems like the Dynamo is more a charger but maybe that is because I associate that with camber dominant boards.

As mentioned earlier it's a really good looking board (2021 model) and the topsheet is very cool.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
...Kind of felt even like the tail was softer than the nose...
This has a slight taper and a setback, but the flex is confusing...I have a cambered twin and was looking for a cambered directional board. This sounds like a great deck, but sounds like it rides more like a twin than a full directional?
 

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This has a slight taper and a setback, but the flex is confusing...I have a cambered twin and was looking for a cambered directional board. This sounds like a great deck, but sounds like it rides more like a twin than a full directional?
If you just move stance back and taper a board with something close to camber, the tail will feel softer than the nose. If you ride it twin it will feel like a twin yes. Some boards have been stiffened up in the tail, and they call it a directional flex, and those are nice for people that like to hit the brakes and stay backseat, take faceshots and so on, more sliding than riding.
 

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This has a slight taper and a setback, but the flex is confusing...I have a cambered twin and was looking for a cambered directional board. This sounds like a great deck, but sounds like it rides more like a twin than a full directional?
It definitely feels directional (a bit of rocker in the nose, which is significantly bigger than the tail). Not sure if 3mm of taper is even noticeable to be honest, but there's a lot of boards with 3-5mm these days. Many boards that are good in powder have a softer tail for easy turning and a stiffer nose to blast through tracked out and uneven snow. It also means you can lean forward a bit and make deep powerful carves or lean back and slash it up.

If you want something VERY directional and totally different from your twin, this is not the board. Look at the vids from Libtech, Austen Sweetin wrecking pillow lines and big heli-access terrain but also Phil Hansen doing 720s and hitting rails in the park. Its the sort of board that aims to be versatile and work as the only board you need. Closest board from Lib that is more directional is the BRD. Similar profile and flex but more taper and rocker in the nose. Same nice black textured topsheet.

Or just get a Korua and forget about your twin after one run :cool:
 
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