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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
So we all find out early on that the rule of thumb is short board = easier to turn, long board = high speed stability.

What does "high speed" actually mean?

I've been using the Ski Tracks app for a few days and it seems that I top out around 25mph. I may get a little faster, but I can't see myself going much beyond that. I'm much more interested in tackling more technical terrain than getting faster.

I ride a Lib TRS that is slightly above my ideal weight range (according to frosty rider). At these speeds, is there even a point? Would going down 4cm introduce anything negative, besides less float in powder?

I like the board and am doing fine with intermediate runs on it, kinda struggling with most blacks (but I blame lack of skill, not the board) but I haven't tried anything else in a while.

How do you know when you are reaching the "stability ceiling" for a given board length, is the question I guess.
 

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You would mainly feel it in the form of chatter. Then just instinct,,knowing that your grip is likely near its limit. I would say high speed is 40 mph plus. Most any board should be pretty decent up until there with the exception of dedicated jib noodles.
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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The board will chatter and feel really unstable when you're pushing it too hard. I'm talking probably 35+ mph is where you'd really start to notice it.

If you're not hard carving runs at significantly higher speed than most people on the hill, I wouldn't worry about it, you could probably downsize a bit.

I recently picked up a 4 cm shorter board than what I'm used to riding, and at low speeds it feels about the same, at high speeds it's noticeably more "sketchy" feeling underfoot.

I guess the other question is, are you having trouble with short quick turns now? Trees, moguls, spins and technical riding? If not, I'd stick with what you've got.
 

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While that rule is true, I can mach down Birds of Prey or the far side of Keystone (ski courses) on short jibsticks. Think around 50mph. Its 10% board, 90% rider. If you want to get into more technical terrain you'll benefit more from something stiffer and probably directional than just something longer.
 

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When you reach the "stability ceiling" you will know. Things like that are most noticeable in choppy terrain, the board might chatter, will feel like it wants to skid out in turns and not hold an edge as well. It's pretty hard to put it into words really, you will just feel less in control.
As for a definition of high speeds I don't know if there is a speed limit to define that, be kinda lame if there was. Again high speed is more of a feeling and is different for everyone. The more you get used to it the faster your top speed will be. My best since I started tracking is 70 km\h or 34.5 mph but I know I have gone faster. So I'd say 25 mph is not really a high speed run for me, probably more of a comfortable fast cruise.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The board will chatter and feel really unstable when you're pushing it too hard. I'm talking probably 35+ mph is where you'd really start to notice it.

If you're not hard carving runs at significantly higher speed than most people on the hill, I wouldn't worry about it, you could probably downsize a bit.

I recently picked up a 4 cm shorter board than what I'm used to riding, and at low speeds it feels about the same, at high speeds it's noticeably more "sketchy" feeling underfoot.

I guess the other question is, are you having trouble with short quick turns now? Trees, moguls, spins and technical riding? If not, I'd stick with what you've got.
Yeah, short quick turns are kinda sketchy sometimes. It's not usually a big problem, but I have to really put the effort in, and the odd time I'll still miss my intended line and have to re-correct. I haven't tested this in situations where it really matters, and figured that I need more practice before trying to dodge trees in narrow trails.

I used to ride casually only a few times per year, and then quit for about 7 years, so it's my first season back actually being serious about it, and there was a bit of re-learning...but I don't *think* I had that problem riding shorter boards back in the day. So maybe the board is a factor there.

I think I'll dust off my old board and get it cleaned up then take it out, just to compare. It's an old Option (RIP) with traditional camber, so it won't be apples to apples vs a C2 BTX with magnetraction, but I'll see how it goes.

From what it sounds like though, it doesn't seem like there is any reason for me to look at longer boards in the future until I'm basically doubling my current speeds. I kinda bought it knowing it was a bit longer than ideal, thinking that I'd just figure it out with practice and be a better rider in the end because of it.
 

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The Swiss Miss
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7,441 Posts
I had a 147 Custom X many years and was fine with it at (what I then thought to be) high speeds. But with getting more confident, the speed increased. At some point it began to feel unstable, chattery. Thus I went for longer ones. Now ride a 158 Flagship and I'm pretty sure I'll never reach the limits of this one :) 50mph is the "normal" top speed necessary to reach the slightly elevated chairlift station of my preferred run.
Its by far not as easy to turn as the tiny 147 C X was, but when youre confident enough to hit those speeds, you'll also have the ability to turn a long/stiff board with ease. It kind of goes hand in hand.
 
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