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I am a freshman in college and I have a job at a ski shop in ohio. You now see the reasoning of my title, Ohio is not very snowboarder friendly and college is absolutely not for me. I plan on living this whole winter here to make some money, and learn how to work a ski shop because eventually I want to open one. I know a lot of people have up and moved out to the mountains. Im just looking for stories, tips of how to make a life (especially over summer) and any examples of what set people up for failure. Just looking for any help I can get before the commitment
 

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Why are you even waiting? Move to a resort that offer staff housing, JUST FUCKING MOVE. Get out there and experience life. Work for the resort, live in housing, and realize it sucks but stick through the summer and live the dream.
 

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Why are you even waiting? Move to a resort that offer staff housing, JUST FUCKING MOVE. Get out there and experience life. Work for the resort, live in housing, and realize it sucks but stick through the summer and live the dream.
Good advise, I waited until I was in my 30's and regret the wasted time living in the pit of despair that is the midwest.

Once you get there have fun but keep focused on your goals\dreams
 

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Trust me, if I could move out now I would, but I already have the money put into college and a job I like here. It has to be in the summer, but if my only mistake is I'm waiting too long I'm happy
 

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How much could you possibly be making at a ski shop in Ohio that would either keep you there or help pay for a move come summer.
 

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Trust me, if I could move out now I would, but I already have the money put into college and a job I like here. It has to be in the summer, but if my only mistake is I'm waiting too long I'm happy
If your hell bent on school Bozeman and Salt Lake both have universities within 20 minutes of epic riding, just saying.
 

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Yep, do it now while you're used to living like a broke kid. Once you start making a little bit of money and start having a more comfortable existence, making a big move is a helluva lot harder.
 

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Trust me, if I could move out now I would, but I already have the money put into college and a job I like here. It has to be in the summer, but if my only mistake is I'm waiting too long I'm happy
See. It's already happening. Do it now or you never will and you'll always wonder "what if".

Just ask yourself, what do you have to lose? Right now, pretty much nothing. Keep waiting and that answer will likely change and that'll be why you never get around to doing it.
 

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I'd be more concerned that you're what 18? And already decided you can't handle school, but think you are more than smart enough to create and start a business in what is one of the fastest dying markets out there right now? Don't get me wrong college isn't for everyone and not a necessity to be successful but about 90% of people who decide before the end of their freshman year that school isn't "for them" don't know nearly enough to run and operate their own business. But most importantly, deciding at 18 to drop out of school so you can open your own ski shop is like dropping out of school to be a beeper salesman.
 

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I'd be more concerned that you're what 18? And already decided you can't handle school, but think you are more than smart enough to create and start a business in what is one of the fastest dying markets out there right now? Don't get me wrong college isn't for everyone and not a necessity to be successful but about 90% of people who decide before the end of their freshman year that school isn't "for them" don't know nearly enough to run and operate their own business. But most importantly, deciding at 18 to drop out of school so you can open your own ski shop is like dropping out of school to be a beeper salesman.
A lot of truth in this post too.

I was one of those guys who should've taken some time off between HS and college. All you've ever done at that point is go to school and it's understandable to be burnt out on it. I ended up taking off the second semester of my junior year in college because if I hadn't I wouldn't have finished. I was absolutely sick and tired of going to school and just needed some time away from it.
 

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I'd be more concerned that you're what 18? And already decided you can't handle school, but think you are more than smart enough to create and start a business in what is one of the fastest dying markets out there right now? Don't get me wrong college isn't for everyone and not a necessity to be successful but about 90% of people who decide before the end of their freshman year that school isn't "for them" don't know nearly enough to run and operate their own business. But most importantly, deciding at 18 to drop out of school so you can open your own ski shop is like dropping out of school to be a beeper salesman.
When I was 18 I said I would start a shop, have a brand, and a few other things. I also decided that college fucking sucked as did institutionalized learning.

Best decision I ever made was quitting college. It's not for everyone and some of the best business people I know that are highly successful don't have degrees.

A real world education and experience will trump anything 4 years of sitting on your ass being taught by people that couldn't hack it in the real world. Also the industry isn't dead it's changing and if you know how to adapt with the times you will survive, if you don't bye bye. Shops can thrive, it's just knowing how to be different and not be afraid of taking chances.

Also for a frame of reference I did what this kid is doing, biggest mistake I made was sticking around through a winter to "save" cash to move. I finally said fuck it and bought a one way train ticket to Tahoe with 200 bucks in the bottom of my shoe and 50 dollars in my wallet. Best chance I ever took.
 

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The statement that "college isn't for everyone" is the absolute truth. One of the biggest things wrong with our society right now is that it's trying to force everyone to go to college. People with degrees get out, get jobs and only want to hire other people with degrees. It's a vicious cycle. Some of the jobs these days that require a 4 year degree - (or if not require on paper, essentially do as they're nearly impossible to land without one) are comical.
 

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The statement that "college isn't for everyone" is the absolute truth. One of the biggest things wrong with our society right now is that it's trying to force everyone to go to college. People with degrees get out, get jobs and only want to hire other people with degrees. It's a vicious cycle. Some of the jobs these days that require a 4 year degree - (or if not require on paper, essentially do as they're nearly impossible to land without one) are comical.
^^^^ agree with this. Also, things taught in Trade Schools are not being taught to the masses these days and those skills are now in more demand than a watered-down bachelor's degree. Get training in HVAC or electrical and you will have a lot of opportunities.
 

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When I was 18 I said I would start a shop, have a brand, and a few other things. I also decided that college fucking sucked as did institutionalized learning.

Best decision I ever made was quitting college. It's not for everyone and some of the best business people I know that are highly successful don't have degrees.

A real world education and experience will trump anything 4 years of sitting on your ass being taught by people that couldn't hack it in the real world. Also the industry isn't dead it's changing and if you know how to adapt with the times you will survive, if you don't bye bye. Shops can thrive, it's just knowing how to be different and not be afraid of taking chances.
Like I mentioned not everyone needs it, and there are success stories from people dropping out. BUT the financial side is actually what takes down most businesses, not failure to understand the market and such, and it's also the part you pick up on the least working most jobs. But on the job experience if you get the right stuff is almost always the best choice.

And snowboarding is far from dead, however brick and mortar, while it will never fully die, just like beepers, is fast becoming irrelevant. 10 years from now, when this kid may theoretically be possibly looking in to starting his, do any of us honestly think it's going to get better? And for that to be his whole life plan? Damn near suicidal.

You should move now though. Right after college I packed my crap out, put it in my 275,000 mile beat to crap truck and drove out west with nothing to my name other than a little gas money and the truck which wasn't worth $200. Figured it was the one chance I had where nothing had me tied down. had I waited a few months there is ZERO chance I'd be here now. If you want to move do it now, if you want to make all your life choices now based on opening up a ski shop, well you'd have a better chance with a Political Science or Print Journalism degree, aka just start signing up for welfare now.

For reference Brick and Mortar shops currently in Portland/Mt Hood area and their success:
Exit Real World: Struggling and now a clothing store, had to dump hard goods
US Outdoor: Getting killed by the recent establishment of Evo
Next Adventure: last I heard doing alright, trying to find an online presence but their discounted product is helping them fight through.
REI: Successful, you will not be opening up and REI store though
Evo: brick and Mortar side is a cover for the owners real estate interests, really an online company/warehouse
Hillcrest: Once an establishment in the Mt Hood community, well this is their latest interview with the owner..... http://business.transworld.net/features/30-shops-in-30-days-presents-hillcrest-sports/#sp04bOflXFcWvKVI.97 aka we're dead in the water
Then there are countless boutique shops that have open and closed that aren't worth naming.
 

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The statement that "college isn't for everyone" is the absolute truth. One of the biggest things wrong with our society right now is that it's trying to force everyone to go to college. People with degrees get out, get jobs and only want to hire other people with degrees. It's a vicious cycle. Some of the jobs these days that require a 4 year degree - (or if not require on paper, essentially do as they're nearly impossible to land without one) are comical.
Not to mention that some degrees are not worth the paper they are printed on.

On a side note, I have 5 siblings and the one without a college degree makes more $ than the rest of us combined.
 

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The statement that "college isn't for everyone" is the absolute truth. One of the biggest things wrong with our society right now is that it's trying to force everyone to go to college. People with degrees get out, get jobs and only want to hire other people with degrees. It's a vicious cycle. Some of the jobs these days that require a 4 year degree - (or if not require on paper, essentially do as they're nearly impossible to land without one) are comical.
That's part of the problem. What else you're also seeing is "oh you have a degree, but no experience?"

The on going joke in Breck is that our mountain operations staff is they're the smartest people on the mountain. Only because they have 4 years, Masters, and all that other stupid shit. Yet they can't even get a job bar tending.

Like I mentioned not everyone needs it, and there are success stories from people dropping out. BUT the financial side is actually what takes down most businesses, not failure to understand the market and such, and it's also the part you pick up on the least working most jobs. But on the job experience if you get the right stuff is almost always the best choice.

And snowboarding is far from dead, however brick and mortar, while it will never fully die, just like beepers, is fast becoming irrelevant. 10 years from now, when this kid may theoretically be possibly looking in to starting his, do any of us honestly think it's going to get better? And for that to be his whole life plan? Damn near suicidal.

You should move now though. Right after college I packed my crap out, put it in my 275,000 mile beat to crap truck and drove out west with nothing to my name other than a little gas money and the truck which wasn't worth $200. Figured it was the one chance I had where nothing had me tied down. had I waited a few months there is ZERO chance I'd be here now. If you want to move do it now, if you want to make all your life choices now based on opening up a ski shop, well you'd have a better chance with a Political Science or Print Journalism degree, aka just start signing up for welfare now.

For reference Brick and Mortar shops currently in Portland/Mt Hood area and their success:
Exit Real World: Struggling and now a clothing store, had to dump hard goods
US Outdoor: Getting killed by the recent establishment of Evo
Next Adventure: last I heard doing alright, trying to find an online presence but their discounted product is helping them fight through.
REI: Successful, you will not be opening up and REI store though
Evo: brick and Mortar side is a cover for the owners real estate interests, really an online company/warehouse
Hillcrest: Once an establishment in the Mt Hood community, well this is their latest interview with the owner..... Hillcrest Sports | Gresham, OR | Transworld Business aka we're dead in the water
Then there are countless boutique shops that have open and closed that aren't worth naming.
90% of all failing shops now are a result of a dinosaur mindset. Darwinism is strong and most are too afraid to adapt so they die. You can't keep with the same model that has worked or worked for others because it is horribly dated.

Retail is a changing landscape. Who says he's opening Brick and Mortar? It's all in how you look at things. Everyone said we were stupid for opening another snowboard shop in Breckenridge. We are one 10 snowboard shops in town. We're the newest, and we're the one that has beaten everyone else the last two years with sell through. Why? Because we adapted to the changing market place. When we launch our web store next year that's going to change things as well. In the two years we've been open we've basically shut down our number one competitor to the point that their key accounts have come to us, our second largest competitor has just been sold and all the "loyalty" brands had with that shop has shifted to the point we have them banging down our door. We're doing something right and that's because we looked at what everyone else is doing and said fuck that lets do this.

The best way to learn how to open and run a shop? Work in one and learn from your bosses mistakes. I have nearly 20 years shop experience, 10 of which is corporate retail. Read the industry news and listen to what the people are demanding and you'll be ahead of the game. Too many people sticking their heads in the sand and pretending everything is the same. My business education was taught to me on the sales floor and just working.
 

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That's part of the problem. What else you're also seeing is "oh you have a degree, but no experience?"

The on going joke in Breck is that our mountain operations staff is they're the smartest people on the mountain. Only because they have 4 years, Masters, and all that other stupid shit. Yet they can't even get a job bar tending.



90% of all failing shops now are a result of a dinosaur mindset. Darwinism is strong and most are too afraid to adapt so they die. You can't keep with the same model that has worked or worked for others because it is horribly dated.

Retail is a changing landscape. Who says he's opening Brick and Mortar? It's all in how you look at things. Everyone said we were stupid for opening another snowboard shop in Breckenridge. We are one 10 snowboard shops in town. We're the newest, and we're the one that has beaten everyone else the last two years with sell through. Why? Because we adapted to the changing market place. When we launch our web store next year that's going to change things as well. In the two years we've been open we've basically shut down our number one competitor to the point that their key accounts have come to us, our second largest competitor has just been sold and all the "loyalty" brands had with that shop has shifted to the point we have them banging down our door. We're doing something right and that's because we looked at what everyone else is doing and said fuck that lets do this.

The best way to learn how to open and run a shop? Work in one and learn from your bosses mistakes. I have nearly 20 years shop experience, 10 of which is corporate retail. Read the industry news and listen to what the people are demanding and you'll be ahead of the game. Too many people sticking their heads in the sand and pretending everything is the same. My business education was taught to me on the sales floor and just working.

This thread just about talked me into moving, but my thing is the fact that I do work at a ski shop now to learn from. I am obviously going to try to work in one out west but what if I dont get a job. That is what is holding me back, so that means I guess I'm moving after this semester (which is only because it is paid for so I might as well use it). What if it doesnt work isnt really a good enough reason for me. Thanks guys, but keep talking. I am loving your inputs
 
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