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Discussion Starter #1
Hey y’all I’ve been snowboarding for a couple years now pretty casually and I’ve just started to get serious about it and really want to be able to become proficient at carving. I have footage of myself (which I will attach) that I think shows me skidding my heel side carves. I’m grateful to anyone who wants to help give me as much criticism and tips as they can because anything helps!!
 

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The first thing to improve is to get rid off the back foot ruddering. Both the heelside and the toeside carves are initiated by a pivot of the back foot instead of digging in the edge from the front foot at the initiation phase.

This is very common to self-learners. There is plenty of instructional videos on Youtube.

What I’ve found helpful while teaching my friends (that I still forced to work on the basics with an instructor for the first 2 days to have their first turns) is to keep your both hands at all times over the tips of the board. At all times. This greatly reduces the counter rotation that results in ruddering and makes you bend your knees more (you do bend them already).
You need to go back to the basics for a short time to silence the upper body a bit.

When you have it corrected, imagine that your turn starts from the toes and heel on your front foot. You need more weight distribution there. You can help yourself with pointing with the front hand the front part of the sidecut that you want to engage to start the turn (the widest part of the nose). The back hand should be still over the tip. You’ll start scarving the turns.
The next step will be to start feeling the balance on edge. To do so you need to overexaggerate multiple times with your butt low so it doesn’t hurt and you are ‚calibrating yourself’ between riding not enough edge and going too far over it.

As you seem to be stoked on snowboarding and motivated to improve, you should be able to actually start some carving within several days on snow if you take it back to mellow runs and fix those basics.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you very much, the back foot ruttering as you put it is something I’ve noticed myself doing for awhile and since I wasn’t falling anymore I kind of assumed that it was ok. Im thinking that that’s the reason as to why Im not going as fast as some of my other friends on the slopes.

So following your explanation I should be initiating the turn with my front foot rather than my back, but while I’m doing that what am I doing with my back foot? Do I just allow it to follow ?

In a couple months when the slopes open back up in my area I’m going to have my friends record me again so you can see the difference your tips have made!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ooo also as you might notice in the video I have a hard time on straights when I guess as my friends tell me I’m supposed to just let my board go flat on the snow, are there any tips for that or is it as simple as standing evenly on my board?
 

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Yes, the back foot should follow. You initiate the turn with the front foot and then keep it more centered but at the begining you’ll feel like being centered is like leaning forward. Finishing the turn with more weight on the backfoot is for using the rebound to change the edge/make more drawn out carve but it’s more complex. You will progress there later on.

The for-aft movement (weight shifting) is also a more complex concept that you’ll work on later on. Don’t bother it now. You have it in the link I posted.
This ruddering also has its use but it’s for freestyle and speed checks.

As far as straight lining is concerned, you need to keep your body aligned with the snowboard, with knees and ankles slightly bent and keep the weight centered. The board plays an important role here, especially the profile with camber being the best. If I bomb like that I usually still keep my board ever so slightly on edge so in case I lose full control or the board starts to drift, I know what edge it’s on (I’ve chosen it, not the drifting) so I know where to move my weight if I need to regain balance without catching an edge.

That’s a nice full instructor guide:
 

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It looks like you're on a board that's flat to rocker or at least camrock with a significant amount of rocker. You seem to be turning using the middle of the board and the tips (mostly the tail) are sliding around. This is going to be particularly pronounced on flats.

Part of this is the nature of non-camber boards when they're not on edge; you're not using the sidecut at all and it's going to be really difficult to turn using the tips when the tips aren't touching the snow. To fix that without getting a camber board you're going to have to lean that board over enough so that the tips dig in and the middle of the board comes off of the snow a bit.

Grab the board now and put it on your living room floor. Put a little pressure on the middle and when it's flat, see where the board is touching the floor. Imagine the board is turning using these contact points.

Now tilt the board up on edge until it's about 30 degrees up on the toe or heel side. Because of the sidecut, the tip and tail will now be the only parts contacting the floor. This is the point where you can start to carve using the sidecut instead of pivoting the base around. If you flex the board in the middle, you'll see the middle of the board can also touch the ground so depending on board flex you'll have to increase the angle even higher to engage the tips.

Now watch your own video again, and see how often you even have the board at enough of an angle to engage the sidecut. It's probably not very often, and this is one of the reasons your tail is sliding around.

To carve, you have to have enough energy to keep the board's sidecut fully engaged which means you have to lean over. This requires riding more aggressively which means either more speed or quicker turns. Have you ever ridden a bike where you wiggle the handlebars to steer left/right/left/right really quickly so that you're constantly on the edge of tipping over but don't? Same idea with carving at slower speeds. If you're doing it right, your body will be leaned at an angle where if you weren't moving, you'd fall down.

As for flats, the only thing that's going to get you through those without the board feeling squirrely is a full camber board or a lot of momentum. On a rocker board sometimes it helps to twist the board with your feet so your front heel edge and back toe edge are slightly engaged or vice-versa. If I have to go slow on flats my weight is on the front foot and I'm lifting my back heel a tiny bit to keep the tail from sliding around. But really, just don't go slow on flats.
 

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Not sure if it was mentioned already, but I've noticed that as you change edges you immediately try to point board down the fall line. There is no time for the edge to dig into the snow as your snowboard accelerates too quickly and the forces are already too big. Instead, you should change the edge as you traverse the fall line, wait until the opposite edge is engaged and let the sidecut do its job.

Also bend your knees more and avoid bending in the waist.
 

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Ok Here it is, and I’m sure the posters above me said it already as they’re good members to have in this thread. Get lower (Bend your knees) and get on the front foot to initiate turns. You’ve got to move your weight forward and back on the board in addition to toeside and heelside.
 

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Lots of good advice already. Also be aware that if you are carving all the way down the slope, you will be slower than your friends if they are bombing down.

There are loads of riders that can bomb but can't carve properly. Nice to see you are interested in learning the right way :)
 

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Not being an advance rider I would still add two things. First thing is to slow down a little. The other thing is an unpopular advice. You might want to initiate your turns on your front foot, but it's not necessary. The carving takes place along the entire edge and you need to apply pressure with your back foot as well. That doesn't mean you need to ride on your back foot, but you can't keep too much weight on your front foot either. Lots of riders who are ruddering seem to be riding very front foot heavy.

Snowboard addiction has very good videos on this. It's very much about when you engage your edge.

I would also recommend the "pressure through turns" and "round smooth turns" video.

 

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...since I wasn’t falling anymore I kind of assumed that it was ok.
Get lessons. You're clearly self-taught or taught by folks who are not strong riders. Your problems go well beyond "skidding ... heel side carves". I didn't see a single proficient toe side carve in that entire video, which makes sense if you weren't aware you need to drive turns off the front foot.

This thread has some good advice, but it's not like you're a few steps away... your fundamentals are just off. Your body weight is wrong, you're initiating by counter rotating your shoulders rather than driving off the front foot, you're not bending your knees enough, you have zero involvement from your ankles... all of that is going to be much easier to fix with real time feedback.

If lessons are prohibitive expensive, videos can be helpful. I found Snowboard Addiction videos to be pretty solid, and I believe there's a good number of Youtube based lessons out there now.

Most self-taught folks have awful fundamentals and a lot of bad habits to overcome to become competent riders. I speak from experience, I mostly taught myself and had a lot of hurdles to becoming a decent riding. A few well-timed lessons would have taken a ton off the learning curve.
 

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Agree with @kimchijajonshim. You have to get the fundamentals first before you think of carving. Get a lesson first.

You first need to get a feel for riding on edge for longer stretches before you want to do carved turns. ATM, you're very insecure on your heel edge. So exercise riding ON that heel edge. Do whatever skidded turn to get heelside, and then ride +/- perpendicular ON that heel edge keeping the same tilt. Bend knees. Next time, bend lower. Keep the board on edge longer, lower, longer, longer, lower, and lower. Give your muscles time to learn to hold and balance that position. Get as low as to even grab the front edge between your feet. Not by bending over in waist, but having KNEES and ankles bent. This will take several days. Keep doing it. The body only learns through repetition.

Then do things like riding on toe edge, or heel edge, and bend knees super low, then stand tall upright, low, up, low, hop, wave your arms, swing those arms, hop a.s.o. all the while try keeping the very same wide turn on edge. With such things, you develop a real feel for the edge which your knees n ankles control automatically and independently from upper body. Once there, then work on carved turns. Learn to walk, before you run :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
, in regards to lessons it’s been something I want to do but just can’t afford, I’ll watch these videos and do my best to apoly it to my boarding. If any of y’all are interested in giving more tips I’ll be sure to post another video in this thread in around 2-3 months where I’m hopefully using these tips to properly carve! I didn’t expect to get this much help but I’m so grateful for it seeing as paid lessons are a bit out of reach. Thank you all and anyone else who may stumble upon my improper carving video so much
 

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Lots of good advice already. Also be aware that if you are carving all the way down the slope, you will be slower than your friends if they are bombing down.

There are loads of riders that can bomb but can't carve properly. Nice to see you are interested in learning the right way :)
I don’t know if I agree with that as an absolute. Sure it’ll take longer to cover the same distance but proper carving generates speed, or at least the sensation of.
 

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You first need to get a feel for riding on edge for longer stretches before you want to do carved turns. Atm, you're very insecure on your heel edge. So exercise riding on that heel edge. Do whatever skidded turn to get heelside, and then ride +/- perpendicular ON that heel edge keeping the same tilt. Bend knees. Next time, bend lower. Keep the board on edge longer, longer, longer, lower, lower, lower. Give your muscles time to learn to hold and balance that position. Get as low as to even grab the front edge between feet. Bot by bending over, but having KNESS and ankles bent. This will take several days. Keep doing it. The body only learns through repetition.
This is really good advice. I taught my daughter to grab her toe side edge in a heel side carve as a fun "trick" to do, but if you can do that and hold that position you know that you're balanced and actually carving. To do it for "real" you have to bend your knees and get low and be pretty committed to the carve.
 

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There's a lot of good advice on this thread, the best item being to nail the fundamentals before trying more advanced techniques.

One thing that needs clarifying is the advice to put your weight on your front foot. That's good general advice because a lot of self-taught people unconsciously lean back, and then compensate by throwing their weight around to turn. However, it's possible to have your weight forward and still be throwing the tail around. But in that case, it's an actual technique, done purposely.

More generally, there are situations where you want your weight forward, and situations where you want your weight centered. There are even situations (at the end of a C turn, for instance), where you want your weight to end up on your back foot. But these are all advanced techniques, and you need to get the basics nailed first.

Regarding the question of edge control, it depends on speed mostly. At low speeds, you'll tend to steer with your front foot, pressing up or down with the toe to engage the heel or toe edge, and then following with the back foot. At higher speeds, that's not only unnecessary, but probably impossible to control. At higher speeds, you tilt the whole board and either follow the edge radius with a full carve or let the back slide a bit for a scarve. You control which one you're doing by shifting your weight appropriately.

The point though is that there are a lot of subtleties in play, but you can only use those if your basics are nailed. It's unfortunate that you can't do lessons, but next best is to either video yourself or get a buddy to do it, then spend time evaluating your riding and correcting issues. And/or post the vids here and we'll be glad to trash you. 😁
 

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Not being an advance rider I would still add two things. First thing is to slow down a little. The other thing is an unpopular advice. You might want to initiate your turns on your front foot, but it's not necessary. The carving takes place along the entire edge and you need to apply pressure with your back foot as well. That doesn't mean you need to ride on your back foot, but you can't keep too much weight on your front foot either. Lots of riders who are ruddering seem to be riding very front foot heavy.

Snowboard addiction has very good videos on this. It's very much about when you engage your edge.

I would also recommend the "pressure through turns" and "round smooth turns" video.

I like this advice. I hear the que to initiate with the front foot and this make work in certain situations. But I like to think of generating weight into the board equivalently. Imagine yourself performing a basic barbell squat. With generation of leg drive through both legs you ensure that the centre of the board is pushed into the ground. This results in the side cut being completely utilized (I speak specifically for classic camber). The result with time and practise is precision that literally will allow you to target chunks of snow and you cutting them in half with either edge you choose! This technique took me 33 days to fully understand and articulate but once it begins to work, your riding will be admirable even among veterans of the sport. Carving properly simply feels, looks beautiful as you display athletic capability with practical understanding of using the edge to shed.

Another note I would recommend is increasing the angle on your bindings. This will train proper foot positions as it will precede the initiation of the squat to set the edge into the ground.

Your curiosity will pay off. Have faith in yourself and trust the process. One day that light bulb will go off and that's it, your going to shredding until your an old man as the sport becomes smooth and 'real easy on the knees.'

Sent from my LM-G710 using Tapatalk
 

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TL;DR

Go watch some instagram of toy313 and the whole Korua Yearning for Turning series. Watch closely, pay attention to their weight distribution over the board and how they initiate the board more or less from the middle. Keeping your weight a little more centered will help to ensure both tip and tail stay engaged.

End of the day, caring is by and far a style. Take the advice of us to get going, then ignor any and all other than watching some guys you want to emulate. Learning too much of the "right" way means you don't develop a personal style, which is sad.
 

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TL;DR

Go watch some instagram of toy313 and the whole Korua Yearning for Turning series. Watch closely, pay attention to their weight distribution over the board and how they initiate the board more or less from the middle. Keeping your weight a little more centered will help to ensure both tip and tail stay engaged.

End of the day, caring is by and far a style. Take the advice of us to get going, then ignor any and all other than watching some guys you want to emulate. Learning too much of the "right" way means you don't develop a personal style, which is sad.
Thanks for this, just watched the first one and I know what i'll be doing the rest if the day, awesome vid
 
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