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Discussion Starter #24
Im not sure how I forgot to give the details of my board to you guys but here it is. I’m not sure if the tips y’all give will defer knowing this info but just in case !
154509
 

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As already pointed out, you need to go back and dial in your basics to start carving and you can do it on any board, including this beginner/low intermediate Rossi District. For more powerful riding techniques you’ll find it lacking but don’t bother it now. It has an extruded base so it’s one of the reasons you’re slower flat basing. Don’t forget to upload your progression vid here and how it went with the advice in this thread!
 

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Im not sure how I forgot to give the details of my board to you guys but here it is. I’m not sure if the tips y’all give will defer knowing this info but just in case ! View attachment 154509
imho, it is a very shitty board profile for learning to carve.
LoL, the catch free..."auto turn" the Elon Musk of snowboarding. It is pretty much the opposite of what you want for carving...in that you want the edges to catch and DIG in, you want it stiff (not soft) to rail carves and the side-cut is pretty small.
Get a traditional cambered mid-to-full stiffy.
 

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There's something special about that warm and fuzzy feeling when you straightline perfect groomers.
Yup, there is something to be said about getting comfortable with straight-lining groomers. That is, it helps you get comfortable with speed, so that speed is no longer the issue. Then you can work on using carves to manage your speed; followed by the pursuit of doing perfect carves given your intended style, speed, using the conditions and terrain given/available....whether it be deep pow, groomer or ice carves.
 

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imho, it is a very shitty board profile for learning to carve.
LoL, the catch free..."auto turn" the Elon Musk of snowboarding. It is pretty much the opposite of what you want for carving...in that you want the edges to catch and DIG in, you want it stiff (not soft) to rail carves and the side-cut is pretty small.
Get a traditional cambered mid-to-full stiffy.
You're right that the board isn't great for railing high speed carves, but it's fine for OP's current situation and progression. He needs to learn how to turn before he can carve and that board is more than enough. Someone with those fundamentals is going to get demolished by a stiff, directional cambered board.
 

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I don't agree.

Learning on boards with the catch free style will only teach and reinforce improper body mechanics. Riding the classic camber both regular and switch will allow good body mechanics to develop.

Bombing down the hill is 'cool' sometimes but it's more enjoyable to be able to complete an entire run cutting edge to edge down the entire Hill only using the base to ride on for more mellow, slower portions of the mountain. Learning how to ride the classic camber is a MUST if you're pursuit is caring and riding with total control and precision. The no catch edge and the style of riding that it promotes looks sketchy and to me not entirely safe.



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Bombing down the hill is 'cool' sometimes but it's more enjoyable to be able to complete an entire run cutting edge to edge down the entire Hill only using the base to ride on for more mellow, slower portions of the mountain.
I think you'll find what is most enjoyable is subjective. Each to their own.
 

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I love carving and I love bombing too. If you can get going so fast that you feel downward G forces when the slope mellows out that's incredibly fun.

But OP, you can learn to carve on a mostly rocker board like that, but it's not going to be a board that teaches you to carve. Get on a stiffer full camber board and you will no longer be able to cheat and get away with the things you're doing wrong. You will definitely learn proper riding technique faster that way; if you're off-balance or trying to skip around it will be immediately apparent.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Thanks everyone, so I’m seeing the popular idea is to get a full camber board and spend some time on that, I’ll look into getting a used one in order to try and establish my habits and feel the difference between the boards.
 

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What were some of the bad habits you learned from riding a cambered board?

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Thanks everyone, so I’m seeing the popular idea is to get a full camber board and spend some time on that, I’ll look into getting a used one in order to try and establish my habits and feel the difference between the boards.
This board is full of oldies like myself who learned to carve on full camber boards. But once you can carve, you can carve any board.

I don't think you need to change your board. You will get more value out of lessons
 

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What were some of the bad habits you've learned from a cambered board?

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All the usuals, actually. The weird profiles were just starting to come into vogue when I was in my early snowboarding years. By the time I had my first non-camber board (a 2010 Heritage), I was already ruddering, bending at the waist, counter-rotating, and the rest. The only real difference I think would be that I learned early about keeping my downhill edge up.

The point is, it may be that rocker and other boards allow you to get sloppy on some specific techniques, but I don't see how riding a camber board is automatically going to make you a significantly better rider. Lessons are still worth their weight in gold.
 
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