Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got a NS Proto, which I love. Last year I was looking for something a little more speed/carve/big hill oriented, so I tried the Premier F1. It was as advertised - fast and stable but heavy and dead feeling. I'm planning on selling it.

Does the Raptor seem like a logical board to try instead? Last year people talked me out of it because they thought it might be "too much" board for me. (I'm an intermediate-advanced rider, maybe advanced, not expert.)

Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,669 Posts
Where are you and what type of terrain are you talking about?

If you're talking about buying a Raptor and you ride primarily in the midwest, then I'd probably say you're buying a way too much board.

But, ultimately I'd try to demo first. The thing about NS boards, especially their freeride oriented boards, is that they are vey damp. Some people just don't like that. The Proto is damp for what it is, but nothing like the Raptor or Premier. You may be one of those people. Different strokes for different folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I tested out Raptor at Whiteface in all kinds of conditions from ice to very soft fresh snow and it work great in all of them. It was very fast and stable, I was able to go way faster and felt more in control then on my old board and I am no expert too. I liked it and got a new for next season. Now all I need is to find bindings to match it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
I've got a NS Proto, which I love. Last year I was looking for something a little more speed/carve/big hill oriented, so I tried the Premier F1. It was as advertised - fast and stable but heavy and dead feeling. I'm planning on selling it.

Does the Raptor seem like a logical board to try instead? Last year people talked me out of it because they thought it might be "too much" board for me. (I'm an intermediate-advanced rider, maybe advanced, not expert.)

Thoughts?
Both the Premier and the F1 are NS's 'big hill' boards. Raptor is not really 'more board' than the F1. It might be a bit more lively, but the main difference is in the sidecut: The F1 is designed for carving/sweeping turns across the fall line, while the Raptor sidecut is more for bombing/straight lining.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
Both the Premier and the F1 are NS's 'big hill' boards. Raptor is not really 'more board' than the F1. It might be a bit more lively, but the main difference is in the sidecut: The F1 is designed for carving/sweeping turns across the fall line, while the Raptor sidecut is more for bombing/straight lining.
Yeah, having owned both boards this is pretty spot on with how I felt they rode. The sidecut on the Raptor was kind of a buzzkill for me, and I thought the board was pretty one dimensional.

OP, If you like the way the Premier carves, but just want something a little less tank like, try sizing up on the Heritage.
 

·
Veteran Member
Joined
·
11,555 Posts
hktrdr's description is pretty dead on. All I did on the Raptor was bomb things. It was great for that. Pillows, steeps, that sort of thing. It is a board you have to be on top of no doubt.

linville's question is probably the most relevant at the moment. Where are you riding? You are really talking about boards that are more suited to the North American West ski areas, Euro Zone mountains, and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I ride a mix - smaller place in the NY Catskills like Windham or Belleyare, a couple Vermont trips to Mt Snow or Killington or wherever, and usually at least one week long trip out West every year, Breckenridge, Crested Butte - Jackson Hole this year.

What does it mean exactly that it's a board "you have to be on top of"? That's the part that kept me from buying it last year, but then ended up with something that wasn't as lively as I wanted.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top