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Discussion Starter #1
I've been renting for years, but now that I want to go more often I decided to finally complete my gear with board and bindings. So, last night I set up my very first bindings on my very first board, and everything seemed well.

However, when I was testing the setup at home I noticed two things that I'd like some feedback on:

1. I'm getting a lot of space between my highback and my boot when leaning on my toe side, especially on my front foot. Here's an album of what it looks like. In those photos, I was leaning forward on a chair to engage my toe side, and on my front foot I can literally fit my entire hand between the highback and the boot. I've always been told that it's best to minimize the space between highback and boot, even during toe side? I like some forward lean on my highbacks for increased response on my heel side, but at that point I'd already put my highbacks with 4 notches of forward lean. Should I just put more lean on it, or is there something else I can try? Back foot is not as bad. Is it OK if I have different highback lean on my front and back feet?

2. I've seen recommended that we should rotate our highbacks to be parallel to the heel edge of the board to transfer energy more efficiently. I did that with my front foot, but when I engage my heel edge the boot seems to press mostly on just one side of the binding. Is that the way it should be, or did I misunderstand the recommendation about highback rotation?

Thanks in advance!
 

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It's normal for boot to come away from highback on toe side, so all is good. You can always add more forward lean if you want though, it's down to personal preference.

Re rotation, can't really tell from those photos but prob also ok
 

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1. Set up the lean on your highback so that it feels good when you do a heelside turn. Where it sits on a toeside turn is completely irrelevent.
2. Some bindings have that ability, some don't. If you've set up the highback parallel to the edge and you have a lot of angle on your binding (as opposed to 0 degrees or close to it), then you will by necessity be pushing on the highback with something other than the back of the boot. The point is that your weight is pushing into the middle of the highback on the heelside turn, which minimizes flex on the highback. But if it feels hinky, adjust it to taste.

How are you for heel/toe centering?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
1. Set up the lean on your highback so that it feels good when you do a heelside turn. Where it sits on a toeside turn is completely irrelevent.
2. Some bindings have that ability, some don't. If you've set up the highback parallel to the edge and you have a lot of angle on your binding (as opposed to 0 degrees or close to it), then you will by necessity be pushing on the highback with something other than the back of the boot. The point is that your weight is pushing into the middle of the highback on the heelside turn, which minimizes flex on the highback. But if it feels hinky, adjust it to taste.

How are you for heel/toe centering?
Thanks for the detailed response :) Understood on the first point. I'll play around with the forward lean next time I go to the mountain and see what feels best. Depending on the bindings, I've normally done 2-4 notches.

I'm most comfortable riding with a forward stance of +12/+3, so I turned the highback on my front foot to make it parallel to the heel edge. I've never experimented with rotating highbacks on my previous rentals, but you're right that now I'm not pushing the middle of the highback during heelside. I'm gonna switch it back and try it normally first to get used to the "default" feeling of the bindings, and then rotate it to parallel and see how that works. Thanks again!
 
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