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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm a newbie at snowboarding (just finished my 3rd trip), and I've been lurking in this part of the forum in hopes of learning more about snowboarding so that I can hopefully improve faster in future trips.

I was watching SnoWolf's YouTube videos, and he mentioned in his chairlift video, most getting-off-the-lift problems is due to mental fear. How did you guys get over this fear? I've been eating it off the lifts all last weekend at Mt. Rose near Reno and it was quite frustrating..... Although getting off the lifts in Big Bear was quite easy, but that's besides the point.. :dunno:

I think a lot of it had to do with going straight off the chair from a sitting position. I hold the chair, I stand up and look straight ahead, but I have a pretty bad sense of balance so by the time my board leaves the flat (and too short....) platform, I'm already wobbling around and leaning too far forward or too far back. I get that it takes practice and eventually, I'll find my balance easy-peasy, but even when I DO find my balance in time, I'm scared silly of going "too fast" straight down the slope so I eventually end up leaning backwards and crashing anyway.

My question is, how did you guys overcome this fear of going too fast when getting off the lifts? Other than manning up and going straight into it... Lol... I really don't want to blow out my knees, I'm too accident-prone. :(
 

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So I'm a newbie at snowboarding (just finished my 3rd trip), and I've been lurking in this part of the forum in hopes of learning more about snowboarding so that I can hopefully improve faster in future trips.

I was watching SnoWolf's YouTube videos, and he mentioned in his chairlift video, most getting-off-the-lift problems is due to mental fear. How did you guys get over this fear? I've been eating it off the lifts all last weekend at Mt. Rose near Reno and it was quite frustrating..... Although getting off the lifts in Big Bear was quite easy, but that's besides the point.. :dunno:

I think a lot of it had to do with going straight off the chair from a sitting position. I hold the chair, I stand up and look straight ahead, but I have a pretty bad sense of balance so by the time my board leaves the flat (and too short....) platform, I'm already wobbling around and leaning too far forward or too far back. I get that it takes practice and eventually, I'll find my balance easy-peasy, but even when I DO find my balance in time, I'm scared silly of going "too fast" straight down the slope so I eventually end up leaning backwards and crashing anyway.

My question is, how did you guys overcome this fear of going too fast when getting off the lifts? Other than manning up and going straight into it... Lol... I really don't want to blow out my knees, I'm too accident-prone. :(
Stop thinking you have a bad sense of balance?

But seriously, thinking that isn't going to help.

Practice skating one footed when getting around, not just off lifts. Play with changing edges, initiating solidly with that strapped in front foot.

Get a stomp pad or some sort of grip for the loose back foot.

Just chill when you get off the lift, visualize goin straight down and coming to a stop on one of your edges. Don't try to edge too hard as soon as you get off, you'll nail someone.

Weight on that front foot!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can skate and initiate turns fine with only one foot strapped in on the bunny slopes, but that's probably because I can ease myself into it, whereas I guess I feel that the chairlifts go by ridiculously fast... =/

When people say "weight on that front foot," does it simply just mean to keep your weight at the center of the board since most people end up leaning way back?? I put too much weight and I somehow end up falling forward.. =/
 

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So I'm a newbie at snowboarding (just finished my 3rd trip), and I've been lurking in this part of the forum in hopes of learning more about snowboarding so that I can hopefully improve faster in future trips.

I think a lot of it had to do with going straight off the chair from a sitting position. I hold the chair, I stand up and look straight ahead, but I have a pretty bad sense of balance so by the time my board leaves the flat (and too short....) platform, I'm already wobbling around and leaning too far forward or too far back. I get that it takes practice and eventually, I'll find my balance easy-peasy, but even when I DO find my balance in time, I'm scared silly of going "too fast" straight down the slope so I eventually end up leaning backwards and crashing anyway.

My question is, how did you guys overcome this fear of going too fast when getting off the lifts? Other than manning up and going straight into it... Lol... I really don't want to blow out my knees, I'm too accident-prone. :(
You should really only be standing up on the "downhill" portion, there is not much you can do at the earlier flat portion where the chairlift is still pushing you. Just scoot around so only your back leg is still on the chair, make sure your board is actually pointing straight down the fall-line, gently push off with your arms once you reach the beginning of the downhill portion and just relax... there are very few chairs in Tahoe that have really steep runouts (which you shouldn't be doing anyway on your third day).

When people say weight your front foot, the mean keep your back foot "unweighted" so you could lift it up off your stomp pad if you wanted to.

What resorts are you learning at?
 

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I think it was Snowolf in his chairlift video who gave the tip about imagining that you are grabbing a 6" rope at the nose of your board when you unload from the chair. That keeps your knees bent, weight on the front foot, and your shoulders not counter-rotated.

Some unload ramps are built steeper than others, for whatever reason, and it varies by resort. In Tahoe, I've found that Northstar has the easiest ramps to unload.
 

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I have found the 60 -40 split works well for me when unloading granted I have been doing it for some time now. What I mean by that is what has been said more weight on your front foot less on the back. I would not really worry about it to much everyone falls. My wife is in her second year of boarding and still tries to take me out when we get off the lift, almost made the rule cant ride on the lift with me. I would stop worrying so much about it cause that is like 1% of the time and going down the hill is the other 99%. Everything comes with time, most people dont master the lift for a while. To really help with the fear of unloading do everything with one foot out just go down all greens with one foot out. Also everything looks scary cause you need to get to muscle memory first and that takes up to or over 1000 times of doing it.
 

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here's what I do when I get off.

1) relax
2) wait a second longer, and let the other people sitting with you get off, so that you won't feel crowded.
3) place your board in line, get your back foot in line on your stomp,
4) wait for that tipping point, where you get up, and then let the chair gently push you out.
5) relax
6) slide down, and if you don't feel comfortable cruising, gently start braking with your free foot.
7) relax.

fast forward to the 1:52 mark, and see how I do it.

 

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Some of my friends still have problems getting off. I find instead of using the stomp pad I prefer to hang my foot slightly off the edge of my board so I can dig it into the snow to stop or turn. If I want to make a right I hang my toe slightly off, left I hang my heel slightly off. Though some use their hand on the lift to push off, I prefer to just stand up evenly, and just let the seat of the lift push against my rear leg.


Edit: Don't panic about going too fast on the downhill, just ride it out, then gain control when you are on the flatter surface. And stop psyching yourself out on the way to unload, picture yourself getting off the lift smoothly, ask the people on the lift which way they want to go off too if it worries you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks so much for all the tips and suggestions, everybody!

@lonerider: Would it be wrong to stand up on the flat part and keep the back-hand lightly touching against the seat so that the board and I would be pushed off..? 'Cause that was what I was trying to get at, standing up soon-ish once my board hits the platform, but then the platforms at Mt. Rose are quite short anyway so I can never seem to find my balance before going down the ramp.. =/ And so far, I've been learning at Mt. Rose in Reno. I've been to Big Bear in SoCal once, and their unloading areas were a lot nicer for me. xD
 

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it would help to get a stop pad for your back foot

when you are about to get off the lift relax and dont think about it to much if you fall while getting off the lift, it happens you are still learning.

practice boarding with one food out of the binding so you get used to the feeling

practice makes perfect
 

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Thanks so much for all the tips and suggestions, everybody!

@lonerider: Would it be wrong to stand up on the flat part and keep the back-hand lightly touching against the seat so that the board and I would be pushed off..? 'Cause that was what I was trying to get at, standing up soon-ish once my board hits the platform, but then the platforms at Mt. Rose are quite short anyway so I can never seem to find my balance before going down the ramp.. =/ And so far, I've been learning at Mt. Rose in Reno. I've been to Big Bear in SoCal once, and their unloading areas were a lot nicer for me. xD
Imagine pushing a computer chair across the room by the seat back with only one hand... not so easy to keep it going in a straight line and keep it from spinning around, right?

That's what is happening to you if you try to use your backhand to let the chair push you across the flat section at the top of the lift - you will have a tendency to push off-angle and get twisted around and off-balance over time.
 

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OFF TOPIC: For that starting shot, what was the POV/Camera Setup. I just ordered a Hero 2 Outdoor Addition from THRYLL and I REALLY like that shot. Could you take a pic of the setup or something please?! Thanks!


NOWW: Back on topic.
I found putting more weight on the FRONT binding helps with strait balance. I usually do that, then at the bottom use my heel to slow and skate over to sit and strap in. Mental fear is just about practice and getting used to the situation.
 

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OFF TOPIC: For that starting shot, what was the POV/Camera Setup. I just ordered a Hero 2 Outdoor Addition from THRYLL and I REALLY like that shot. Could you take a pic of the setup or something please?! Thanks!
it was just a regular rounded 3m sticky mount on top of my helmet, I was looking down on my board for a few seconds there. :thumbsup: have fun filming, its addicting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have one of those Dakine stomp pads that are ridiculously spiky, but if you're still sitting on your back butt cheek with your board tip facing forward (and up), your back leg wouldn't really line up with the stomp pad.. Which means that essentially, getting off the lift generally involves standing up with the foot on the stomp pad while being pushed by the chair on the back leg...?? And this all happens simultaneously, yes? O.O!

@Jaa - I have the exact same pair of knee pads!! :D
 

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You ride the lift with anyone you know? Whenever I ride with someone who's new Ill let them grab onto my extended arm off the chairlift builds their confidence.

Best advice I got was simple. Lean forward. Seemed to work for me. Weight over the front foot.
 

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Look at the horizon...way off in the distance as if merely gazing at the lovely mtns...to help you stand taller with back straight and knees slightly bent, be more relaxed, you might even try putting your rear foot right up behind your back binding. Thinking about being in a netural position and bouncing on your knees...find a flat spot, stand on the board with front foot strapped in and kind of loosely bounce in your knees in a relaxed manner...that's the feeling you want when going down the ramp. Then go straight down the ramp, burn off some speed then slightly weight (it doesn't take much weighting) an edge to turn.
 
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