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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there, new to the forum still but there is alot of info on here and very detailed info also so i have already read alot of info , old and new over the seasons from your folks. so thanks for sharing your ups and downs as does make us new folks learn alot more info faster in places like this.
i am a new boarder still in terms of levels but spent a number of days on slopes now, pick up things quite quick it seems and progressed fast in the beginner part the instructors said to me , getting to the higher bigginer level , so i got the basics down on rental boards nothing grate just basic boards bindings but am looking to pickup my own gear in the sales now as i feel having your own equipment does change the game up and push's us to learn more and try new things. so i'm looking to hit the slops properly come the new winter season or when things get back to normal in the world..

living in the UK so ill be hitting the slopes in Europe mostly to the east (Austria,Italy,Romania etc sometimes little further if i feel like it)
only looking hit the resorts and slopes right now i have no plan to hit the parks yet, and i feel when i got these would be a few seasons away and i would by that time be looking for a park board for those days to play on and expand in that area better we all like new gear now and then right.. so right now i am looking for an all mountain board that can go from a good beginner to intermediate+ side

rider specs
Hight 170cm(5ft6)
Weight 80Kg (176lb)
Boot UK9 (US10)


Boards i have looked into, seems some times i overlap into two board sizes quite well, best to keep on short side or longer side for still learning , as i did read a shorter board at the out set still would be good to keep learning the turns, linking and edge control.
i am looking for a board that i can progress on well for some time with out thinking i have to get another board year or two later on. but something that will let me learn teach me the right way but not bite back all the time but will let you know when you got it wrong but in a it will kill you way..
done alot of reading but still would like some more real world data feedback from those that have ridden boards for awhile now and those that have been where i have been pulling the trigger on there first own board

Yes Basic - 155
Yes Typo - 155 (158 maybe too long ?) this gets recommended alot over the basic even for newcomers it seems abit more all mountain if i understand it over a basic, read some good reviews from beginners that started on this always good tings said on this board from all that have or tried it.

Gnu Carbon Credit - 153 or 156
Gnu Riders Choice - 154.5 (157.5 again on long side?) read some good reviews also from beginners on this always good tings said on this board from all quite popular it seems

Burton Instigator - 155
Burton Process Flying V - 155 or 157 - not the best edge holding and stable i have read for a high beginner low intermediate rider


Bindings
i know this will depend alot on the board i go for also to match-up flex wise so looking to pickup at the same time,
Union Flite Pro - M
Burton Custom - M
Burton Cartel - M Maybe on the harder side for starting?
Burton Genesis - M, high end but lower medium flex good deals on these maybe a binding that can last a good time to progress on boards with if i go more beginner board then to a intermediate board.

still open to other options nothing set in stone, but right now im leaning to the Yes Typo or Burton Instigator , riders choice was up on the list but more a 3rd now after reading abit more on it and reading more on the other two. but still all ears..

thanks for the input.
 

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Plenty of options but from your short list the Typo is a very good choice. My friend started last season, got his first turns on rentals and got a Typo 155 (he is 70 kg 8,5 US) and the board really let him progress further. I’ve ridden it (85 kg 9,5 US) multiple times and had a lot of fun on it taking into consideration it is too small for me for an all mountain. Forgiving, poppy, turny, very good grip on ice.

On the Instigator - my cousin’s first board, I rode it in 161 and I was overpowering it in carves after my 20 first days on snow. It’s a noodle beginner board that is quite pricy for what it offers. My K2 Standard I rode that day too was so superior to it that I changed back after 2 hours. Even the nice looks and the novelty factor couldn’t make me keep riding it that day. Drop it. Find something else from Burton if you want to support them.

GNU RC - my cousin’s second board, he sold the Instigator after his first season. It’s a solid board, rode it in 161 so a bit too big for me. Great at absorbing chunder but I prefer camber dominant boards. But for CRC board it is very solid. If you want a Mervin board it’s a good choice, though more an intermediate ride imo.

On the bindings, again plenty of options but for sure go for something mid flex that you can keep riding for the next seasons. I’m a gear whore and I’ve noticed that none of my friends who started ever had a problem learning on my mid-flex bindings. Two of my friends started this season and I pointed them to Flux DS and Rome Katanas as their first bindings and no issue with the learning curve. Don’t go Burton Customs - I had these, quality but too costly for a soft beginner binding that you will find lacking all-mountain once you progress. I’ve heard good things about Burton Mission if you want cheaper Burton bindings what will stay with you for a longer time.
 

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Hi Robh,

All gear decisions (board, boots and bindings) should start with your barefoot measurements. Rider height is not a factor in board sizing, but barefoot measurement is crucial to getting this right. Please measure your feet using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.

STOKED!
 

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+1 on boots being the most important piece of gear. Everyone starts off too big, let Wired help you get sized properly.

If I was starting out again, I'd choose something like the Nidecker Area, and some solid middle of the road bindings that won't break the bank. I just saw K2 Indy bindings for like $100.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the reply's so far

Wiredsport
Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters).
length,
Right = 26.8cm
Left = 26.7cm

For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
Width = 9.8cm

rob
 

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Like other posters have said, your boots are your most important purchase (especially as a beginner). Comfortable feet keeps you happy and without pain; your riding will also improve faster as you can focus on your technique rather than your foot cramps. So I'd spend a lot of time trying out different boots in person. Make sure you don't size too big (as all boots break in), it's super important to get the right fit. Spend money on the boots, other stuff is less important.

The Yes Basic and Yes Typo are both good choices. I'd also say the Arbor Westmark, Bataleon Evil Twin, and Capita Outerspace Living are some other options. Bataleon and Arbor also have catch free edges with their boards, so that's also helpful. I don't think you need to get a beginner board; an intermediate one is fine that you can grow into. You could opt for full rocker (which is easier to learn on), or you could get some hybrid camber boards with rocker nose/tail. If you know your riding style will lean towards all mountain, then I definitely recommend trying a camber/rocker hybrid. But if you'll be spending most of your time in the park, then all rocker is fine.
 

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thanks for the reply's so far

Wiredsport


length,
Right = 26.8cm
Left = 26.7cm


Width = 9.8cm

rob
Hi Rob,

Got it. You are Mondopoint 270 or size 9 US in snowboard boots at a "Normal" D width.

STOKED!
 

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Hi robh, welcome!!

I won't speak to boots because others have already covered that.

Others have mentioned upturned edge boards like Bataleon - I had a couple of those, and I feel they're an acquired taste. They're incredibly well built boards (and very high quality in my experience), just that the TBT edges overall, didn't agree with me - I liked the idea, but ended up selling them on.

I feel that if you're just starting out, from a "learning to snowboard" perspective (as opposed to "hey look I'm snowboarding!"), you're better off getting into something Camber 2.0 or camber dominant, which the Yes boards are - camber under the feet, rocker in the tip and tail. I personally feel that learning how camber rides (and paying the price when you mess up), will set you up to be a better rider over the long term, as well as broaden the range of boards you'd comfortably be able to get on to, for your next purchase.

From your list, I'd be all over a Yes Typo. The Yes boards that I've had and ridden (Greats, Basic, Standard, Jackpot) are all pretty catch-free and forgiving at the contact points, but those points are there when you need them to be. If you had access to a Yes Standard at a similar price, that'd be my pick - I rode one for a few runs, and was pretty blown away - more capable than its name suggests.

For bindings, I think that the Burton Custom is a waste of money - I've thought about downgrading to those (for their soft flex), but for a very specific purpose. I do not feel that these would serve you well, over an extended period of intended progression and growth.

Burton Cartels - I don't think these would necessarily be unforgiving to a novice. I used to be of the opinion that they'd be a waste of $$$ - either just get the Mission or the Malavita, but after I bought a pair, and learned that they could do everything I wanted of them - park days, playing around, surfing pow, carving uphill - I was pretty humbled by how evergreen a binding they can be. These would be a worthy investment for you, that you could definitely grow into, yet won't inhibit progression, in my opinion.

Other bindings:
-- Burton Clutch -- I've got a pair, and love them to death. Surfy, soft chassis that you can really wring out during a carve, with a nice stiff highback that absolutely has your back, when you want to slay.
-- Burton Mission -- These wouldn't be bad, but for a few extra bucks, I'd go the Cartels, and call it a day for a few seasons. Maybe you'll have to replace a toe ladder here and there, which you can get from literally any snowboard store in the world.
-- Burton Genesis -- I've seen a few pairs on the mountain, with broken highbacks (by this, I mean part of the Y that stems from the middle to the edge of the highback). Lots of people no doubt love these, but being a heavier rider who likes to charge hard from time to time, I've ruled these out for myself, due to this design flaw.
-- Flux DS, with the new highback -- Flux is simply bomb proof. The only draw with these, is lack of underfoot padding, if that's something you require (which sadly for me, is a requirement)
-- K2 Lien AT -- had a pair of these. Very light, pretty sweet and VERY underrated binding, in my humble
-- Now IPO -- had a pair of these, the skate tech really does work, it's great to be able to customize the flex/feel of the bindings, and they were all around a fun binding.
-- Ride Rodeo / Nitro Team / Arbor Cypress / Rome DOD have me intrigued, for next season (well, the Ride A6 or C6, given the new direction they're going with their bindings) -- they all come across as decent middle-of-the-road bindings that would serve growth well
-- Can't speak to Union bindings, as I've never been interested in them at all.

Food for thought!
 

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Another vote for the Typo here (I would go for the 158 at 80kg for all mountain)

Source: I was in a similar position and went for the Basic (161 at 90kg). It's a great board but after 20ish days on it I want something more akin to the Typo.

This:
I don't think you need to get a beginner board; an intermediate one is fine that you can grow into.
Great post by buller_scott too. Agree on going for a camrock profile, having rented rockers and a full camber. I've not ridden a standard but it is on my shortlist.

At US 9 the world is your oyster binding wise!
Again, I erred of the softer side to start with (Union Contacts) and they are decent (well made, comfortable, great toe strap, great heel-cup adjustment) but was not long before I started wanting something more responsive.
I have just upgraded to some Cartels but not had a chance to ride them. Some good deals on them at the moment. Rome DOD were also on my list. If I wasn't between sizes (US 10.5) I would have looked at Union Forces, Now IPOs, Now x YES etc.

But.... another way of looking at it: in my experience it is much easier to find a Basic than a Typo at this time of year (at least in the UK). If you can't find a Typo you could get a Basic now as a decent progression board (you could do 155 or 158) it would serve you well learning park too. Then you could keep the Basic and get a beefier all mountain board in couple of seasons, instead of looking for a new park board.
 

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But.... another way of looking at it: in my experience it is much easier to find a Basic than a Typo at this time of year (at least in the UK). If you can't find a Typo you could get a Basic now as a decent progression board (you could do 155 or 158) it would serve you well learning park too. Then you could keep the Basic and get a beefier all mountain board in couple of seasons, instead of looking for a new park board.
This is another viable approach if you are ready to buy a second board for a quiver next season. In this case get a Basic in 155 that will serve you as a park board later on.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
big thanks for all the reply's, wealth of info given out.

for boots i am thinking to go with the thirtytwo Zephyr for starting out and some nice deals on these right now also..

what are peoples thoughts on single BOA systems , im thinking to keeping to laces to start with

i'v found some new burton cartel reflex 2020 for £155 seems a good deal to me.
board still not fully decided Yes TYPO or Capita Outerspace Living which does come in alot ceaper also right now close to a yes basic price infact.

thanks to every one above and still to reply, maybe see you on a mountain one day pay you back with a drink
rob
 

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what are peoples thoughts on single BOA systems , im thinking to keeping to laces to start with
I've got some Ride Fuse boots that have a single BOA attached to the tongue to lock in the heel combined with traditional laces. I like it a lot. I'm coming from double BOA and speed lace systems, and I'm happy with traditional laces again. It just takes a moment longer getting my boots on, but I've got more control over fit, pressure points and stiffness.
 

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Your lacing system is a matter of personal preference—whichever you choose, I find it's important to have dual-zone (separate fastening for the top and bottom zones). Boa is the fastest system with speed-zone lacing coming in second. Traditional laces are not only the slowest, but they're also difficult/slow to adjust while you're up on the slopes. Sometimes I like to tighten/loosen throughout the day depending on how my feet are feeling—that's why I don't like traditional laces. So I'd say go with Boa or Speedzone if possible, but it is a personal preference.

Typo and Outerspace are both similar boards, so I think you'd do well with either one. If you don't have a big preference, use the money you save on the cheaper board and put it to your boots.
 

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I feel like the benefit to laces is comfort over speed. You mention the importance of dual-zone, and I agree. Laces are like a dozen-zone. I always had hot spots with dual BOA and Speed Zone, but everyone's feet is different. I also find that I really never adjust my laces on the hill, whereas I was always messing with my BOAs. Also, replacing a worn lace is a thousand times easier than threading in new cables. Definitely try on as many boots and systems as you can to find the one that works best for you. BOA and Speed Zone are very popular with good reason. Laces work really well too.
 

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Nitro has some good deals on boots. Nitros don't have a small footprint like Adidas or Burton, but they're comfy from day one (IMHO). Like others are saying boots are where it all starts. There are tons of boards that can work for you (Typo, Basic, Salomon Assassin, Nidecker Merc, et al). I think the Cartels are good choice for an all around binding.
 
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